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Melatonin, sleep, aging, and the health protection branch.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211936
Source
J Psychiatry Neurosci. 1996 May;21(3):161-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1996
Author
S N Young
Source
J Psychiatry Neurosci. 1996 May;21(3):161-4
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging - drug effects - physiology
Canada
Drug Approval - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Humans
Male
Melatonin - adverse effects - physiology - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Nonprescription Drugs - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Sleep - drug effects - physiology
Treatment Outcome
United States
Notes
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PubMed ID
8935327 View in PubMed
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Tryptophan depletion, executive functions, and disinhibition in aggressive, adolescent males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204755
Source
Neuropsychopharmacology. 1998 Oct;19(4):333-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
D G LeMarquand
R O Pihl
S N Young
R E Tremblay
J R Séguin
R M Palmour
C. Benkelfat
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Neuropsychopharmacology. 1998 Oct;19(4):333-41
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aggression
Cognition
Double-Blind Method
Humans
Impulsive Behavior
Male
Quebec
Tryptophan - administration & dosage - blood - deficiency
Abstract
Low serotonin has been associated with aggressive behavior and impulsivity. Executive functions (cognitive abilities involved in the initiation/maintenance of goal attainment) have also been related to aggression. We tested whether dietary depletion of tryptophan, the amino acid precursor of serotonin, would increase disinhibition (impulsivity) in aggressive male adolescents. Cognitive-neuropsychological variables predictive of disinhibition were explored. Stable aggressive and nonaggressive adolescent men received balanced and tryptophan-depleted, amino acid mixtures separately (counterbalanced, double-blind). Commission errors on a go/no-go learning task (i.e., failures to inhibit responding to stimuli associated with punishment/nonreward) measured disinhibition. Aggressive adolescent males made more commission errors as compared to nonaggressives. Lower executive functioning was significantly related to commission errors over and above conventional memory abilities. Tryptophan depletion had no effect on commission errors in the aggressive adolescents, possibly because of a ceiling effect.
PubMed ID
9718596 View in PubMed
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