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Annualized incidence and spectrum of illness from an outbreak investigation of Bell's palsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188646
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2002 Sep-Oct;21(5):255-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
A M Morris
S L Deeks
M D Hill
G. Midroni
W C Goldstein
T. Mazzulli
R. Davidson
S G Squires
T. Marrie
A. McGeer
D E Low
Author Affiliation
Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Microbiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., Canada.
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2002 Sep-Oct;21(5):255-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bell Palsy - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Diagnostic Errors
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Infection - complications
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
There are limited clinical and epidemiological data on patients diagnosed with Bell's palsy. While investigating an apparent clustering of Bell's palsy, we sought to characterize the spectrum of illness in patients with this diagnosis.
A telephone survey of persons with idiopathic facial (Bell's) palsy in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA, population = 4.99 million) and Nova Scotia (population = 0.93 million) from August 1 to November 15, 1997 collected information on subject demographics, neurological symptoms, constitutional symptoms, medical investigation and management. Information regarding potential risks for exposure to infectious agents, past medical history, and family history of Bell's palsy was also collected. Subjects with other secondary causes of facial palsy were excluded.
In the GTA and Nova Scotia, 222 and 36 patients were diagnosed with idiopathic facial (Bell's) palsy, respectively. The crude annualized incidence of Bell's palsy was 15.2 and 13.1 per 100,000 population in the GTA and Nova Scotia, respectively. There was no temporal or geographical clustering, and symptomatology did not differ significantly between the two samples. The mean age was 45 years, with 55% of subjects being female. The most common symptoms accompanying Bell's palsy were increased tearing (63%), pain in or around the ear (63%), and taste abnormalities (52%). A significant number of patients reported neurological symptoms not attributable to the facial nerve.
No clustering of cases of Bell's palsy was observed to support an infectious etiology for the condition. Misdiagnosis of the etiology of facial weakness is common. Patients diagnosed with Bell's palsy have a variety of neurological symptoms, many of which cannot be attributed to a facial nerve disorder.
PubMed ID
12207155 View in PubMed
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Assessment of in-flight transmission of SARS--results of contact tracing, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184796
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2003 Jun 15;29(12):105-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2003
Author
J. Flint
S. Burton
J F Macey
S L Deeks
T W Tam
A. King
M. Bodie-Collins
M. Naus
D. MacDonald
C. McIntyre
M. Krajden
M. Petric
C. Halpert
L. Gustafson
A. Larder
Author Affiliation
Immunization and Respiratory Infections Division, Centre for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control (CIDPC), Health Canada.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2003 Jun 15;29(12):105-10
Date
Jun-15-2003
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Canada - epidemiology
Communicable disease control
Contact Tracing
Disease Outbreaks
Humans
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - epidemiology - transmission
PubMed ID
12822294 View in PubMed
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A cocoon immunisation strategy against pertussis for infants: does it make sense for Ontario?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104982
Source
Euro Surveill. 2014;19(5)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
G H Lim
S L Deeks
N S Crowcroft
Author Affiliation
Public Health Ontario, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Euro Surveill. 2014;19(5)
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Computer simulation
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Immunization Programs - organization & administration
Immunization, Secondary - methods - statistics & numerical data
Incidence
Infant
Infant mortality
Models, Statistical
Ontario - epidemiology
Pertussis Vaccine - administration & dosage
Socioeconomic Factors
Vaccination - methods - statistics & numerical data
Whooping Cough - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Pertussis deaths occur primarily among infants who have not been fully immunised. In Ontario, Canada, an adult booster dose was recently added to the publicly funded immunisation programme. We applied number-needed-to-treat analyses to estimate the number of adults that would need to be vaccinated (NNV) to prevent pertussis disease, hospitalisation and death among infants if a cocoon strategy were implemented. NNV=1/(P(M) X R) + 1/(P(F) X R), where P(M),P(F) (proportion of infants infected by mothers, fathers) were sourced from several studies. Rates of disease, hospitalisation or death (R) were derived from Ontario's reportable disease data and Discharge Abstract Database. After adjusting for under-reporting, the NNV to prevent one case, hospitalisation or death from pertussis was between 500-6,400, 12,000-63,000 and 1.1-12.8 million, respectively. Without adjustment, NNV increased to 5,000-60,000, 55,000-297,000 and 2.5-30.2 million, respectively. Rarer outcomes were associated with higher NNV. These analyses demonstrate the relative inefficiency of a cocoon strategy in Ontario, which has a well-established universal immunisation programme with relatively high coverage and low disease incidence. Other jurisdictions considering a cocoon programme should consider their local epidemiology.
Notes
Comment In: Euro Surveill. 2014;19(5). pii: 2068924524233
PubMed ID
24524236 View in PubMed
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Enhanced surveillance of invasive meningococcal disease in Canada: 1 January, 1999, through 31 December, 2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181463
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2004 Feb 1;30(3):17-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2004
Author
S G Squires
S L Deeks
R S Tsang
Author Affiliation
Immunization and Respiratory Infections Division, Centre for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2004 Feb 1;30(3):17-28
Date
Feb-1-2004
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Canada - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Neisseria meningitidis - classification
Population Surveillance
Seasons
Serotyping
PubMed ID
14971276 View in PubMed
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Vaccine coverage during a school-based hepatitis B immunization program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205714
Source
Can J Public Health. 1998 Mar-Apr;89(2):98-101
Publication Type
Article
Author
S L Deeks
I L Johnson
Author Affiliation
Ontario Ministry of Health, North York.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1998 Mar-Apr;89(2):98-101
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Hepatitis B vaccines - administration & dosage
Humans
Immunization Programs
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Program Evaluation
School Health Services
Abstract
Ontario initiated a universal hepatitis B immunization program for grade seven students in the fall of 1994. An ecological study was conducted within seven health units of the Greater Toronto Area to assess vaccine coverage. The study population consisted of all grade seven students enrolled within schools in the participating health units, on October 1, 1994. There were 39,935 students enrolled in 604 schools eligible for inclusion in the study. Consent to receive the vaccine series was obtained for 88% (range across health units from 81.5% to 96.3%) of the students. Among students for whom consent was obtained, an average of 95% (range 88.1% to 99.5%) completed the series. Therefore, the total vaccine coverage for the study population was 84% (range 77.5% to 89.5%). Series completion varied by school board, education provider and the use of Ministry of Health educational material. A limiting factor in achieving high vaccination coverage among grade seven students was obtaining consent to receive the vaccine series.
PubMed ID
9583249 View in PubMed
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