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Cancer mortality following in utero exposure among offspring of female Mayak Worker Cohort members.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122596
Source
Radiat Res. 2012 Sep;178(3):160-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
S J Schonfeld
Y V Tsareva
D L Preston
P V Okatenko
E S Gilbert
E. Ron
M E Sokolnikov
N A Koshurnikova
Author Affiliation
Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. schonfes@mail.nih.gov
Source
Radiat Res. 2012 Sep;178(3):160-5
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aging
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - mortality
Nuclear Reactors
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Risk
Russia
Abstract
Little is known about long-term cancer risks following in utero radiation exposure. We evaluated the association between in utero radiation exposure and risk of solid cancer and leukemia mortality among 8,000 offspring, born from 1948-1988, of female workers at the Mayak Nuclear Facility in Ozyorsk, Russia. Mother's cumulative gamma radiation uterine dose during pregnancy served as a surrogate for fetal dose. We used Poisson regression methods to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of solid cancer and leukemia mortality associated with in utero radiation exposure and to quantify excess relative risks (ERRs) as a function of dose. Using currently available dosimetry information, 3,226 (40%) offspring were exposed in utero (mean dose = 54.5 mGy). Based on 75 deaths from solid cancers (28 exposed) and 12 (6 exposed) deaths from leukemia, in utero exposure status was not significantly associated with solid cancer: RR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.58 to 1.49; ERR/Gy = -0.1 (95% CI
Notes
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PubMed ID
22799629 View in PubMed
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Comparison of mortality in Asbest city and the Sverdlovsk region in the Russian Federation: 1997-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276960
Source
Environ Health. 2016 Mar 01;15:42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-01-2016
Author
E V Kovalevskiy
S J Schonfeld
E. Feletto
M. Moissonnier
S V Kashanskiy
I V Bukhtiyarov
J. Schüz
Source
Environ Health. 2016 Mar 01;15:42
Date
Mar-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asbestos, Serpentine
Cities - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - history
Female
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Russia - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The Sverdlovsk region of the Russian Federation is characterised by its abundance of natural resources and industries. Located in this region, Asbest city is situated next to one of the largest open-pit chrysotile asbestos mines currently operational; many city residents are employed in activities related to mining and processing of chrysotile. We compared mortality rates from 1997 to 2010 in Asbest city to the remaining Sverdlovsk region, with additional analyses conducted for site-specific cancer mortality.
Population and mortality data for Asbest city and Sverdlovsk region were used to estimate crude and age-specific rates by gender for the entire period and for each calendar year. Age-standardized mortality rates were also calculated for the adult population (20+) and Poisson regression was used to estimate standardized mortality ratios, overall and by gender.
During the period of 1997 to 2010, there were similar mortality rates overall in Asbest and the Sverdlovsk region. However, there were higher rates of cancer mortality (18 % males; 21 % females) and digestive diseases (21 % males; 40 % females) in Asbest and lower rates of unknown/ill-defined in Asbest (60 % males; 47 % females). Circulatory disease mortality was slightly lower in Asbest. Cancer mortality was higher for men in Asbest from oesophageal, urinary tract and lung cancers compared to the Sverdlovsk region. In women, cancer mortality was higher for women in Asbest from stomach, colon, lung and breast cancers compared to the Sverdlovsk region.
This large population-based analysis indicates interesting differences but studies with individual exposure information are needed to understand the underlying factors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26926835 View in PubMed
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Lung cancer risks from plutonium: an updated analysis of data from the Mayak worker cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116503
Source
Radiat Res. 2013 Mar;179(3):332-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
E S Gilbert
M E Sokolnikov
D L Preston
S J Schonfeld
A E Schadilov
E K Vasilenko
N A Koshurnikova
Author Affiliation
Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20852, USA. gilberte@mail.nih.gov
Source
Radiat Res. 2013 Mar;179(3):332-42
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Carcinogens - toxicity
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Occupational Exposure
Plutonium - toxicity
Risk factors
Russia
Smoking
Young Adult
Abstract
Workers at the Mayak nuclear facility in the Russian Federation offer a unique opportunity to evaluate health risks from exposure to inhaled plutonium. Risks of mortality from lung cancer, the most serious carcinogenic effect of plutonium, were evaluated in 14,621 Mayak workers who were hired in the period from 1948-1982, followed for at least 5 years, and either monitored for plutonium or never worked with plutonium. Over the follow-up period from 1953-2008, there were 486 deaths from lung cancer, 446 of them in men. In analyses that were adjusted for external radiation dose and smoking, the plutonium excess relative risk (ERR) per Gy declined with attained age and was higher for females than for males. The ERR per Gy for males at age 60 was 7.4 (95% CI: 5.0-11) while that for females was 24 (95% CI: 11-56). When analyses were restricted to plutonium doses
Notes
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PubMed ID
23391147 View in PubMed
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Medical exposure to radiation and thyroid cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101868
Source
Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol). 2011 May;23(4):244-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
S J Schonfeld
C. Lee
A. Berrington de González
Author Affiliation
Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-7238, USA. schonfes@mail.nih.gov
Source
Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol). 2011 May;23(4):244-50
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Oncology
Radiation, Ionizing
Radiography - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - adverse effects
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
In 2008, the worldwide estimated age-standardised incidence rates for thyroid cancer incidence were 4.7 and 1.5 per 100,000 women and men, respectively. Thyroid cancer's overall contribution to the worldwide cancer burden is relatively small, but incidence rates have increased over the last three decades throughout the world. This trend has been hypothesised to reflect a combination of technological advances enabling increased detection, but also changes in environmental factors, including population exposure to ionising radiation from fallout, diagnostic tests and treatment for benign and malignant conditions. Studies of the atomic bomb survivors and populations treated with radiotherapy have established radiation as a risk factor for thyroid cancer, particularly from early life exposure. About 0.62 mSv (20%) of the global annual per caput effective radiation dose comes from diagnostic medical and dental radiation for the period of 1997-2007, increased from 0.4 mSv for the years 1991-1996. This international trend of increasing population exposure to medical diagnostic sources of radiation, attributed in large part to the growing use of computed tomography scans, but also interventional radiology procedures, has raised concerns about exposure to radiosensitive organs such as the thyroid. Worldwide, medical and dental X-rays constitute the most common type of diagnostic medical exposures, but their contribution to the cumulative effective dose is relatively low, whereas computed tomography scans account for 7.9% of diagnostic radiology examinations but 47% of the collective effective dose from diagnostic radiation procedures in parts of the world. Although the radiation exposure from computed tomography scans is substantially lower than that from radiotherapy, multiple computed tomography scans could result in non-trivial cumulative doses to the thyroid. Studies are currently underway to assess the incidence of cancer in large cohorts of children who received computed tomography scans. National and international efforts have been developed to raise awareness and to standardise procedures for use of computed tomography and interventional radiology procedures in paediatric and general populations.
PubMed ID
21296564 View in PubMed
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A retrospective cohort study of cancer mortality in employees of a Russian chrysotile asbestos mine and mills: study rationale and key features.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114549
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2013 Aug;37(4):440-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
J. Schüz
S J Schonfeld
H. Kromhout
K. Straif
S V Kashanskiy
E V Kovalevskiy
I V Bukhtiyarov
V. McCormack
Author Affiliation
Section of Environment and Radiation, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. schuzj@iarc.fr
Source
Cancer Epidemiol. 2013 Aug;37(4):440-5
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Epidemiologic Research Design
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mining
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Chrysotile, a serpentine asbestos fibre, is the only type of asbestos produced and consumed in the world today. It is an established human carcinogen. We have begun fieldwork on a retrospective cohort study of employees of one of the world's largest chrysotile mine and mills, situated in Asbest, Russia. The primary aim of the study is to better characterize and quantify the risk of cancer mortality in terms of (i) the dose-response relationship of exposure with risk; (ii) the range of cancer sites affected, including female-specific cancers; and (iii) effects of duration of exposure and latency periods. This information will expand our understanding of the scale of the impending cancer burden due to chrysotile, including if chrysotile use ceased worldwide forthwith. Herein we describe the scientific rationale for conducting this study and the main features of its study design.
PubMed ID
23608525 View in PubMed
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Risk of Hematologic Malignancies in the Offspring of Female Workers of the Mayak Nuclear Facility in the Southern Urals, Russian Federation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282793
Source
Radiat Res. 2016 Oct;186(4):415-421
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
I. Deltour
Y. Tsareva
S J Schonfeld
V V Vostrotin
P. Okatenko
M. Sokolnikov
J. Schüz
Source
Radiat Res. 2016 Oct;186(4):415-421
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Female
Hematologic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Risk
Russia - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Long-term effects of in utero exposure to ionizing radiation remain poorly quantified in humans. In this study, the risk of hematologic malignancies was investigated in offspring of female workers of the Mayak Production Association, a large Russian nuclear facility. Excess relative risks (ERR) for exposure to gamma radiation and plutonium were estimated in a cohort of 8,466 offspring who were born between January 1, 1948 and December 31, 1988 and followed until 2009. An unstable linear ERR of 1.12 (95% CI 0.11-3.44) per 100 mGy gamma exposure in utero was estimated based on 32 incident hematologic malignancies in 277,002 person-years under risk. The ERR was increased in the dose category 20-79 mGy gamma exposure in utero (1.75, 95% CI 0.04; 5.63), while the other dose categories showed decreased or unstable estimates. Leukemia showed an ERR of 1.76 (95% CI 0.01-8.33) per 100 mGy based on 13 cases. There was no consistent association with plutonium exposure. While an increased risk of hematologic malignancies after gamma exposure in utero was suggested, the small numbers prevented more definitive conclusions.
PubMed ID
27690175 View in PubMed
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Risk of solid cancer in the offspring of female workers of the Mayak nuclear facility in the Southern Urals, Russian Federation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283315
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 2016 Aug;55(3):291-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Y. Tsareva
I. Deltour
M. Sokolnikov
P. Okatenko
V V Vostrotin
S J Schonfeld
J. Schüz
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 2016 Aug;55(3):291-7
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Gamma Rays
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Nuclear Weapons
Occupational Exposure
Pregnancy
Radiation Exposure
Risk
Russia - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies of cancer risk following in utero exposure to ionizing radiation are limited in number, particularly for adult-onset cancers, and the evidence is unclear. In the present study, the risk of solid cancer incidence following in utero radiation exposure is examined among 8466 offspring of female nuclear workers at one of the largest nuclear facilities (Mayak Production Association) in the Russian Federation. Poisson regression methods were used to estimate excess relative risks (ERRs) per Gray (Gy). Mother's uterine gamma dose served as a surrogate for fetal gamma dose. During 277,002 person-years of follow-up (1948-2009), there were 177 first primary solid cancers excluding non-melanoma skin cancers. Estimated in utero gamma and plutonium doses exceeded zero for 41 and 23 % of offspring, respectively. Of the 177 solid cancers, 66 occurred among individuals with some in utero exposure to gamma radiation and 53 among those with estimated plutonium exposures. There was no indication of a statistically significantly increased risk of solid cancer incidence from in utero gamma exposure (linear ERR/Gy -1.0; upper 95 % confidence limit 0.5). This result was unchanged after accounting for subsequent occupational exposure. Plutonium doses were estimated but were too low to obtain meaningful risk estimates. Thus, in this cohort in utero radiation exposure was not associated with solid cancer risk. This is consistent with an earlier report of mortality in the cohort, but is based on twice as many cases and less susceptible to biases inherent in mortality analyses. Given the relatively young age of the cohort with respect to cancer, continued follow-up should be done as the number of cancer cases increases.
PubMed ID
27056719 View in PubMed
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Solid cancer mortality in the techa river cohort (1950-2007).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117528
Source
Radiat Res. 2013 Feb;179(2):183-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
S J Schonfeld
L Y Krestinina
S. Epifanova
M O Degteva
A V Akleyev
D L Preston
Author Affiliation
Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. schonfelds@fellows.iarc.fr
Source
Radiat Res. 2013 Feb;179(2):183-9
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - mortality
Radiometry
Risk
Rivers
Russia - epidemiology
Whole-Body Irradiation
Young Adult
Abstract
Our understanding of cancer risk from ionizing radiation is largely based on studies of populations exposed at high dose and high dose rates. Less certain is the magnitude of cancer risk from protracted, low-dose and low-dose-rate radiation exposure. We estimated the dose-response relationship for solid cancer mortality in a cohort of 29,730 individuals who lived along the Techa River between 1950 and 1960. This population was exposed to both external ? radiation and internal (90)Sr, (137)Cs and other radionuclides after the release of radioactive waste into the river by the Mayak Radiochemical Plant. The analysis utilized the latest individualized doses from the Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS) 2009. We estimated excess relative risks (ERRs) per Gy for solid cancer mortality using Poisson regression methods with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and P values based on likelihood ratio tests. Between 1950 and 2007, there were 2,303 solid cancer deaths. The linear ERR/Gy = 0.61 (95%; CI 0.04-1.27), P = 0.03. It is estimated that approximately 2% (49.7) of solid cancers deaths were associated with the radiation exposure. Our results, based on 2,303 solid cancer deaths and more than 50 years of follow-up, support an increased risk of solid cancer mortality following protracted radiation exposure from the Techa River contamination. The wide confidence interval of our estimate reflects the challenges of quantifying and describing the shape of the dose-response relationship in the low dose range. Nevertheless, the risk estimates provide important information concerning health risks from whole-body radiation exposure that can occur from accidents that result in wide-scale environmental contamination.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23289384 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.