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Developing and implementing food-based dietary guidance for fat in the diets of children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196757
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 Nov;72(5 Suppl):1404S-1409S
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
G H Anderson
S H Zlotkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Canada. harvey.anderson@utoronto.ca
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 Nov;72(5 Suppl):1404S-1409S
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Developing Countries
Diet
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
United States
Abstract
This article discusses the process by which a country can effectively solve health problems through recommended changes in the nutrient content of the diet. Each country must consider not only the development of scientific guidelines suitable for its population, but also strategies for effective food-based dietary guidance to achieve the goal. This is best done by integrating health and dietary goals when forming scientific guidelines and by developing effective partnerships among the many sectors that influence the food supply and food selection. Using fat intake in children as an example, this article describes the determinants of success in achieving the goals of science-based dietary guidelines through food-based dietary guidance.
PubMed ID
11063485 View in PubMed
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Efficacy of meat and iron-fortified commercial cereal to prevent iron depletion in cow milk-fed infants 6 to 12 months of age: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197264
Source
Can J Public Health. 2000 Jul-Aug;91(4):263-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
G S Yeung
S H Zlotkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2000 Jul-Aug;91(4):263-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - epidemiology - prevention & control
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Cereals
Food, Fortified - utilization
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant Food
Meat - utilization
Milk
Abstract
To determine whether utilization of iron from infant cereal and pureed meat was sufficient to prevent iron depletion and/or anaemia in infants 6 to 12 months old fed whole cow milk (WCM) as their primary milk source.
Six-month-old infants were randomized into a treatment group (n = 43) receiving iron-fortified infant cereal (10.2 mg iron), pureed meat (0.75-1.7 mg iron) and WCM for six months or a control group (n = 54) receiving no dietary intervention. Haemoglobin
PubMed ID
10986782 View in PubMed
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A review of the Canadian "Nutrition recommendations update: dietary fat and children.".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212302
Source
J Nutr. 1996 Apr;126(4 Suppl):1022S-7S
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
S H Zlotkin
Author Affiliation
Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Department of Paediatrics, University of Toronto, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 1996 Apr;126(4 Suppl):1022S-7S
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Infant
Abstract
A joint Working Group from the Canadian Paediatric Society and Health Canada met in the early 1990s to consider the applicability of recommendations to restrict total and saturated fat in children > or = 2 y of age. The Group weighed information from the literature on the nutritional needs for growth and development against evidence relating diet to risk of nutrition-related diseases. The Group concluded that the efficacy of the fat-restricted diet could not be assumed. There was no evidence that implementation of the diet would reduce illness in later life or provide benefit to children as children. Regarding safety, some children consuming self-selected diets with low fat intakes have lower energy intakes and food patterns that may compromise the intake of certain key nutrients. The primary recommendations of the Group were that the provision of adequate energy and nutrients to ensure adequate growth and development remains the most important consideration in the nutrition of children and that during the preschool and childhood years, nutritious food choices should not be eliminated or restricted because of fat content. Once linear growth has stopped, fat intake as currently recommended (30:10) is appropriate.
PubMed ID
8642426 View in PubMed
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