Skip header and navigation

1 records – page 1 of 1.

Prevalence and heritability of symptomatic syringomyelia in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and long-term outcome in symptomatic and asymptomatic littermates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266921
Source
J Vet Intern Med. 2015 Jan;29(1):243-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
M S Thøfner
C L Stougaard
U. Westrup
A A Madry
C S Knudsen
H. Berg
C S E Jensen
R M L Handby
H. Gredal
M. Fredholm
M. Berendt
Source
J Vet Intern Med. 2015 Jan;29(1):243-50
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Animals
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Denmark - epidemiology
Dog Diseases - epidemiology - genetics - radiography
Dogs
Female
Interviews as Topic
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - veterinary
Male
Prevalence
Syringomyelia - epidemiology - genetics - radiography - veterinary
Abstract
Syringomyelia (SM) is common in the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (CKCS). Dogs with syringes express clinical signs or might be clinically silent.
To investigate the prevalence and heritability of symptomatic SM, the association between clinical signs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, and long-term outcome.
All CKCS registered in the Danish Kennel Club in 2001 (n = 240).
A cross-sectional questionnaire-based prevalence study validated by telephone interviews and clinically investigated clinical signs of SM. Dogs were 6 years at the time of investigation. A prospective observational litter study including clinical investigations, MRI and 5-year follow-up of symptomatic and asymptomatic siblings. Heritability was estimated based on the scale of liability in the study population and litter cohort.
The cross-sectional study estimated a prevalence of symptomatic SM at 15.4% in the population. Thirteen symptomatic and 9 asymptomatic siblings participated in the litter study. Spinal cord syringes were confirmed in 21 of 22 littermates (95%). Syrinx diameter and mean syrinx : spinal cord ratio were significantly correlated with clinical signs (P
PubMed ID
25308931 View in PubMed
Less detail