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Abnormal brain processing in hepatic encephalopathy: evidence of cerebral reorganization?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141910
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010 Nov;22(11):1323-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Rolf Ankerlund Blauenfeldt
Søren Schou Olesen
Jesper Bach Hansen
Carina Graversen
Asbjørn Mohr Drewes
Author Affiliation
Mech-Sense, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010 Nov;22(11):1323-30
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation
Aged
Auditory Perception
Brain - physiopathology
Brain Mapping
Brain Waves
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Electric Stimulation
Electroencephalography
Evoked Potentials, Somatosensory
Evoked Potentials, Visual
Female
Functional Laterality
Hepatic Encephalopathy - diagnosis - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Median Nerve - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Neural Conduction
Neuropsychological Tests
Photic Stimulation
Psychometrics
Reaction Time
Time Factors
Abstract
Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a severe and frequent complication of liver cirrhosis characterized by abnormal cerebral function. Little is known about the underlying neural mechanisms in HE and human data are sparse. Electrophysiological methods such as evoked brain potentials after somatic stimuli can be combined with inverse modeling of the underlying brain activity. Thereby, information on neuronal dynamics and brain activity can be studied in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensory brain processing in patients with HE.
Twelve patients with minimal or overt HE and 26 healthy volunteers were included in the study. Cerebral sensory processing was investigated as (i) an auditory reaction time task; (ii) visual and somatosensory evoked brain potentials, and (iii) reconstruction of the underlying brain activity.
Somatosensory evoked potentials were reproducible (all P>0.05), whereas flash evoked potentials were not reproducible (all P
PubMed ID
20661140 View in PubMed
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Pain severity reduces life quality in chronic pancreatitis: Implications for design of future outcome trials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265428
Source
Pancreatology. 2014 Nov-Dec;14(6):497-502
Publication Type
Article
Author
Søren Schou Olesen
Jacob Juel
Anders Klitgaard Nielsen
Jens Brøndum Frøkjær
Oliver H G Wilder-Smith
Asbjørn Mohr Drewes
Source
Pancreatology. 2014 Nov-Dec;14(6):497-502
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Analgesics, Opioid - therapeutic use
Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency - complications - pathology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Pain - drug therapy - etiology - psychology
Pain Measurement
Pancreatitis, Chronic - complications - psychology
Quality of Life
Research Design
Smoking - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a disabling disease characterised by abdominal pain, and various pancreatic and extra-pancreatic complications. We investigated the interactions between pain characteristics (i.e. pain severity and its pattern in time), complications, and quality of life (QOL) in patients with CP.
This was a cross-sectional study of 106 patients with CP conducted at two North European tertiary medical centres. Detailed information on clinical patient characteristics was obtained from interviews and through review of the individual patient records. Pain severity scores and pain pattern time profiles were extracted from the modified brief pain inventory short form and correlated to QOL as assessed by the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. Interactions with exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency, as well as pancreatic and extra-pancreatic complications were analysed using regression models.
Pain was the most prominent symptom in our cohort and its severity was significantly correlated with EORTC global health status (r = -0.46; P
PubMed ID
25455540 View in PubMed
Less detail