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Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies do not reflect self-reported disability and physical health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis of less than 5 years of duration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112615
Source
Rheumatol Int. 2013 Nov;33(11):2763-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Chalotte Heinsvig Poulsen
Søren Jacobsen
Morten Frisch
Kirsten Frederiksen
Christoffer Johansen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Survivorship, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, 49 Strandboulevarden, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark, heinsvig@cancer.dk.
Source
Rheumatol Int. 2013 Nov;33(11):2763-72
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - blood - immunology
Autoantibodies - blood - immunology
Case-Control Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Disability Evaluation
Disease Progression
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Peptides, Cyclic - immunology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
It is well accepted that patients with antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suffer from more severe forms of RA in terms of clinical presentation and radiographic destruction at long term compared to anti-CCP-negative patients. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate whether the measures of self-reported health among patients with RA of 0.05). Both groups of RA patients reported significantly more physical disabilities in everyday life and significantly poorer physical health than the controls (both p
PubMed ID
23812092 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer risk in systemic lupus: an updated international multi-centre cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116317
Source
J Autoimmun. 2013 May;42:130-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Sasha Bernatsky
Rosalind Ramsey-Goldman
Jeremy Labrecque
Lawrence Joseph
Jean-Francois Boivin
Michelle Petri
Asad Zoma
Susan Manzi
Murray B Urowitz
Dafna Gladman
Paul R Fortin
Ellen Ginzler
Edward Yelin
Sang-Cheol Bae
Daniel J Wallace
Steven Edworthy
Soren Jacobsen
Caroline Gordon
Mary Anne Dooley
Christine A Peschken
John G Hanly
Graciela S Alarcón
Ola Nived
Guillermo Ruiz-Irastorza
David Isenberg
Anisur Rahman
Torsten Witte
Cynthia Aranow
Diane L Kamen
Kristjan Steinsson
Anca Askanase
Susan Barr
Lindsey A Criswell
Gunnar Sturfelt
Neha M Patel
Jean-Luc Senécal
Michel Zummer
Janet E Pope
Stephanie Ensworth
Hani El-Gabalawy
Timothy McCarthy
Lene Dreyer
John Sibley
Yvan St Pierre
Ann E Clarke
Author Affiliation
McGill University Health Centre, 687 Pine Avenue, V Building, Montreal, Quebec H3A 1A1, Canada. sasha.bernatsky@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
J Autoimmun. 2013 May;42:130-5
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asia - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
International Cooperation
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - epidemiology
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
To update estimates of cancer risk in SLE relative to the general population.
A multisite international SLE cohort was linked with regional tumor registries. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated as the ratio of observed to expected cancers.
Across 30 centres, 16,409 patients were observed for 121,283 (average 7.4) person-years. In total, 644 cancers occurred. Some cancers, notably hematologic malignancies, were substantially increased (SIR 3.02, 95% confidence interval, CI, 2.48, 3.63), particularly non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, NHL (SIR 4.39, 95% CI 3.46, 5.49) and leukemia. In addition, increased risks of cancer of the vulva (SIR 3.78, 95% CI 1.52, 7.78), lung (SIR 1.30, 95% CI 1.04, 1.60), thyroid (SIR 1.76, 95% CI 1.13, 2.61) and possibly liver (SIR 1.87, 95% CI 0.97, 3.27) were suggested. However, a decreased risk was estimated for breast (SIR 0.73, 95% CI 0.61-0.88), endometrial (SIR 0.44, 95% CI 0.23-0.77), and possibly ovarian cancers (0.64, 95% CI 0.34-1.10). The variability of comparative rates across different cancers meant that only a small increased risk was estimated across all cancers (SIR 1.14, 95% CI 1.05, 1.23).
These data estimate only a small increased risk in SLE (versus the general population) for cancer over-all. However, there is clearly an increased risk of NHL, and cancers of the vulva, lung, thyroid, and possibly liver. It remains unclear to what extent the association with NHL is mediated by innate versus exogenous factors. Similarly, the etiology of the decreased breast, endometrial, and possibly ovarian cancer risk is uncertain, though investigations are ongoing.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23410586 View in PubMed
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Cause-specific cardiovascular risk associated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs among healthy individuals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143012
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2010 Jul;3(4):395-405
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Emil Loldrup Fosbøl
Fredrik Folke
Søren Jacobsen
Jeppe N Rasmussen
Rikke Sørensen
Tina Ken Schramm
Søren S Andersen
Søren Rasmussen
Henrik Enghusen Poulsen
Lars Køber
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Gunnar H Gislason
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Gentofte University Hospital, Hellerup, Denmark. ELF@heart.dk
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2010 Jul;3(4):395-405
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Cause of Death
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Studies have raised concern on the cardiovascular safety of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We studied safety of NSAID therapy in a nationwide cohort of healthy individuals.
With the use of individual-level linkage of nationwide administrative registers, we identified a cohort of individuals without hospitalizations 5 years before first prescription claim of NSAIDs and without claimed drug prescriptions for selected concomitant medication 2 years previously. The risk of cardiovascular death, a composite of coronary death or nonfatal myocardial infarction, and fatal or nonfatal stroke associated with the use of NSAIDs was estimated by case-crossover and Cox proportional hazard analyses. The entire Danish population age 10 years or more consisted of 4,614,807 individuals on January 1, 1997, of which 2,663,706 (57.8%) claimed at least 1 prescription for NSAIDs during 1997 to 2005. Of these; 1,028,437 individuals were included in the study after applying selection criteria regarding comorbidity and concomitant pharmacotherapy. Use of the nonselective NSAID diclofenac and the selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor rofecoxib was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular death (odds ratio, 1.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.62 to 2.42; and odds ratio, 1.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.06 to 2.59, respectively), with a dose-dependent increase in risk. There was a trend for increased risk of fatal or nonfatal stroke associated with ibuprofen treatment (odds ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.63), but naproxen was not associated with increased cardiovascular risk (odds ratio for cardiovascular death, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.50 to 1.42).
Individual NSAIDs have different degrees of cardiovascular safety, which must be considered when choosing appropriate treatment. In particular, rofecoxib and diclofenac were associated with increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity and should be used with caution in most individuals, whereas our results suggest that naproxen has a safer cardiovascular risk-profile.
PubMed ID
20530789 View in PubMed
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Childbirths and risk of female predominant and other autoimmune diseases in a population-based Danish cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132468
Source
J Autoimmun. 2012 May;38(2-3):J81-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Kristian Tore Jørgensen
Bo Vestergaard Pedersen
Nete Munk Nielsen
Søren Jacobsen
Morten Frisch
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen S, Denmark. ktj@ssi.dk
Source
J Autoimmun. 2012 May;38(2-3):J81-7
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Autoimmune Diseases - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Reproductive history
Risk
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate the possible biological role of pregnancy on the risk of autoimmune diseases we assessed associations between reproductive history and subsequent risk of autoimmune diseases characterized by female predominance and other autoimmune diseases. Our study cohort comprised 4.6 million Danes born since 1935 for whom a complete record of childbirths was available. Cohort members were followed for hospital contacts for 31 autoimmune diseases from 1982 to 2008. Female predominant autoimmune diseases were those with a female:male sex ratio >2:1. Ratios of first hospitalization rates were calculated using Poisson regression, adjusting for potential confounding by age, birth cohort, calendar period and marital status. During 45.5 million person-years of follow-up 102,260 women were hospitalized with one or more autoimmune diseases. Overall, compared with childless women, women with children were at a relative risk of 1.04 (1.02-1.06) for any autoimmune diseases, 1.11 (1.08-1.14) for female predominant and 0.97 (0.95-1.00) for other autoimmune diseases. Possibly biologically related associations with parity were found for Hashimoto thyroiditis (1.11; 1.00-1.24), Graves' disease (1.19; 1.14-1.24), erythema nodosum (1.15; 1.01-1.32), psoriasis (1.08; 1.01-1.15), sarcoidosis (1.17; 1.06-1.28) and systemic lupus erythematosus (0.83; 0.74-0.93). Especially the one-year postpartum period was associated with an increased risk of Hashimoto thyroiditis, Graves' disease and sarcoidosis. Overall, parity was associated with an 11% increased risk of female predominant autoimmune diseases. Pregnancies resulting in liveborn children therefore seem to contribute only little to the general female predominance in autoimmune diseases. However, for a number of autoimmune diseases; especially autoimmune thyroid diseases, erythema nodosum and sarcoidosis parity might somehow be involved in disease development.
PubMed ID
21813263 View in PubMed
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Concordance of autoimmune disease in a nationwide Danish systemic lupus erythematosus twin cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295917
Source
Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2018 02; 47(4):538-544
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Date
02-2018
Author
Constance Jensina Ulff-Møller
Anders Jørgen Svendsen
Louise Nørgaard Viemose
Søren Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Lupus and Vasculitis Clinic, Centre for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: CJU@dadlnet.dk.
Source
Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2018 02; 47(4):538-544
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Keywords
Adult
Autoimmune Diseases - epidemiology - genetics
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - epidemiology - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Registries
Abstract
To determine the concordance of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and co-aggregating autoimmune diseases among Danish twins.
SLE-affected twins were ascertained by record linkage between the National Patient Register (NPR) and the Danish Twin Registry (DTR). Registered SLE codes were validated through medical chart review and information from the treating physicians. Twin pairs with at least one chart-validated SLE proband were invited to participate in a personal interview and clinical validation of the SLE diagnoses.
Twenty-two twins fulfilled the ACR criteria for SLE. The age- and sex-adjusted point SLE prevalence in the Danish twin cohort was 30.3 per 100,000 persons (95% CI: 19.2-46.5). Among seven monozygotic (MZ), eight same-sex dizygotic (DZss) and five opposite-sex dizygotic (DZos) twin pairs, one MZ and one DZss were concordant for SLE. This corresponded to probandwise concordance rates of 25.0% (95% CI: 7.15-59.1) and 7.7% (95% CI: 1.37-33.3), and pairwise concordance rates of 14.3% (95% CI: 2.57-51.3) and 7.7% (95% CI: 1.37-33.3) among MZ and DZ twins, respectively. An SLE diagnosis was clinically validated in 17 twins from 15 twin pairs. Another four co-twins had other autoimmune disease, corresponding to a probandwise concordance of any autoimmune disease of 50.0% in MZ (95% CI: 21.5-78.5) and 23.1% in DZ twins (95% CI: 8.18-50.3).
Population-based Danish data suggest that SLE twin concordance is lower than previously reported, but still point to the importance of both genetic and environmental factors, and indicate a substantial co-aggregation of other autoimmune diseases in SLE twins.
PubMed ID
28755788 View in PubMed
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Double role of mannose-binding lectin in relation to carotid intima-media thickness in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98701
Source
Mol Immunol. 2010 Jan;47(4):713-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Lone N Troelsen
Peter Garred
Buris Christiansen
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Ib J Christensen
Eva Narvestad
Søren Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark. lone.troelsen@mail.dk
Source
Mol Immunol. 2010 Jan;47(4):713-8
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - blood - complications - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications
Carotid Artery, Common - pathology - ultrasonography
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Genotype
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Mannose-Binding Lectin - blood - genetics
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Tunica Intima - pathology - ultrasonography
Tunica Media - pathology - ultrasonography
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have increased risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) that cannot be explained by excess of traditional risk factors. Several studies indicate that mannose-binding lectin (MBL) may modify the development of atherosclerosis; both high and low serum levels of MBL are reported to be associated with CVD. Intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery (ccIMT) is a validated non-invasive anatomic measure of subclinical CVD. We examined the relation between ccIMT and MBL in 114 RA patients. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study MBL2 genotypes and serum concentrations of MBL were assessed; ccIMT was determined by means of ultrasonography; traditional and RA related cardiovascular risk modifiers were measured. RESULTS: The median ccIMT was 0.67 mm. The investigated MBL2 genotypes were not significantly associated with ccIMT. Using a general linear model, ccIMT was not linearly associated with serum MBL but was highly associated with the quadratic term of serum MBL (MBL(2)) (P=0.001) reflecting a U-shaped relation. MBL(2) was also significantly associated with ccIMT in a multivariable analysis adjusting for traditional and RA related cardiovascular risk modifiers (P=0.025). CONCLUSION: In RA patients, a quadratic U-shaped relation between serum MBL and ccIMT was observed independently of the effects of traditional and RA related risk factors for CVD. These results provide further support to the notion that both high and low levels of MBL may be associated with CVD.
PubMed ID
19939454 View in PubMed
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The effect of McKenzie therapy as compared with that of intensive strengthening training for the treatment of patients with subacute or chronic low back pain: A randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71586
Source
Spine. 2002 Aug 15;27(16):1702-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2002
Author
Tom Petersen
Peter Kryger
C. Ekdahl
Steen Olsen
Soren Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Back Center of Copenhagen, Denmark. tompet@mail.tele.dk
Source
Spine. 2002 Aug 15;27(16):1702-9
Date
Aug-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Demography
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Low Back Pain - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Physical Therapy Modalities - methods - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
STUDY DESIGN: A randomized controlled comparative trial with an 8-month follow-up period was conducted. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effect of the McKenzie treatment method with that of intensive dynamic strengthening training in patients with subacute or chronic low back pain. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Randomized studies indicate that the efficacy of the McKenzie method in the treatment of patients with acute or subacute low back pain is debatable. Currently, no randomized studies examining the effects of this method for patients with chronic low back pain have been published. METHODS: For this study, 260 consecutive patients with low back pain and at least 8 weeks duration of symptoms (85% of the patients had more than 3 months duration of symptoms) were randomized into two groups: Group A was treated with the McKenzie method (n = 132), and Group B was treated with intensive dynamic strengthening training (n = 128). The treatment period for both groups was 8 weeks at an outpatient clinic, followed by 2 months of self-training at home. Treatment results were recorded at the end of the treatment period at the clinic, then 2 and 8 months after. In both groups, 30% of the patients were lost to follow-up evaluation. An intention-to-treat analysis of the main effect variables, disability, and pain was performed for all the patients included in the study. A supplementary analysis of the 180 patients who completed the full treatment program also was undertaken. RESULTS: Intention-to-treat analysis showed a tendency toward a difference in reduction of disability in favor of the McKenzie group at the 2-month follow-up assessment (P = 0.04), but no differences at the end of treatment and at the 8-month follow-up evaluation. No differences in reduction of pain were observed at any time between the groups. The supplementary analysis of the patients who had completed the full intervention showed a tendency toward a difference in favor of the McKenzie method in reduction of pain at the end of treatment (P = 0.02). This difference reached statistical significance at the 2-month follow-up assessment (P = 0.01), but no difference was found after 8 months. The supplementary analysis showed no differences between the groups with regard to reduction of disability. CONCLUSION: The McKenzie method and intensive dynamic strengthening training seem to be equally effective in the treatment of patients with subacute or chronic low back pain.
Notes
Comment In: Spine. 2002 Aug 15;27(16):170912195059
PubMed ID
12195058 View in PubMed
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Family history of systemic lupus erythematosus and risk of autoimmune disease: Nationwide Cohort Study in Denmark 1977-2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284720
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2017 Jun 01;56(6):957-964
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-01-2017
Author
Constance Jensina Ulff-Møller
Jacob Simonsen
Kirsten Ohm Kyvik
Søren Jacobsen
Morten Frisch
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2017 Jun 01;56(6):957-964
Date
Jun-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autoimmune Diseases - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Male
Pedigree
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
To provide population-based estimates of relative risk of SLE and other autoimmune diseases (ADs) in relatives of SLE patients.
A cohort of 5 237 319 Danish residents identified through the Civil Registration System was coupled to their relatives through the parental link and followed for SLE and other ADs between 1977 and 2013 through linkage to the National Patient Register. Twin zygosity was established through the Danish Twin Registry. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression analyses.
During 117.5 million person-years of follow-up, 3612 persons were hospitalized with SLE. HRs of SLE were high among first-degree (HR = 10.3; 95% CI: 8.25, 12.9; n = 80) and second- or third-degree relatives of SLE patients (HR = 3.60; 95% CI: 2.20, 5.90; n = 16). HRs for any AD were elevated in first-degree (HR = 1.51; 95% CI: 1.41, 1.62; n = 785) and second- or third-degree relatives of SLE patients (HR = 1.28; 95% CI: 1.18, 1.39; n = 582). Among individuals with SLE-affected first-degree relatives, the risk was significantly increased for RA (HR = 1.64; 95% CI: 1.35, 1.99; n = 103), IBD (HR = 1.21; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.43; n = 130) and type 1 diabetes mellitus (HR = 1.23; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.48; n = 106). Risk of other ADs was significantly increased both among SLE-affected first-degree (HR = 2.08; 95% CI: 1.88, 2.31; n = 371) and second- or third-degree relatives (HR = 1.38; 95% CI: 1.23, 1.54; n = 313).
Family history of SLE is associated with a clearly elevated risk of SLE and, to a much lesser degree, of RA and other ADs.
PubMed ID
28339674 View in PubMed
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Genetically determined serum levels of mannose-binding lectin correlate negatively with common carotid intima-media thickness in systemic lupus erythematosus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142469
Source
J Rheumatol. 2010 Sep;37(9):1815-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Lone N Troelsen
Peter Garred
Buris Christiansen
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Søren Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. lone.troelsen@mail.dk
Source
J Rheumatol. 2010 Sep;37(9):1815-21
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Atherosclerosis - etiology - genetics
Carotid Artery, Common - anatomy & histology
Denmark
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - blood - complications - genetics
Male
Mannose-Binding Lectin - blood - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Tunica Intima - anatomy & histology
Tunica Media - anatomy & histology
Abstract
Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have excess cardiovascular morbidity and mortality due to accelerated atherosclerosis that cannot be attributed to traditional cardiovascular risk factors alone. Variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin gene (MBL2) causing low serum concentrations of functional mannose-binding lectin (MBL) are associated with SLE and development of atherosclerosis. Recent studies show that these variant alleles are associated with increased risk of arterial thrombosis and cardiovascular disease in patients with SLE. Intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery (ccIMT) is a validated noninvasive anatomic measure of subclinical atherosclerosis. In a cross-sectional study we examined the relation among ccIMT, MBL2 genotypes, and serum concentrations of MBL.
The MBL2 extended genotypes (YA/YA, YA/XA, XA/XA, YA/YO, XA/YO, YO/YO) and serum concentrations of MBL were determined in 41 outpatients with SLE. ccIMT was measured by means of ultrasonography. Traditional and nontraditional cardiovascular risk modifiers were assessed and controlled for.
Using nonparametric Mann-Whitney tests we found a significant difference in ccIMT between low-expressing (XA/XA+YA/YO+XA/YO+YO/YO) and high-expressing (YA/YA+YA/XA) MBL2 genotypes (p = 0.034). The difference in ccIMT remained significant in multivariable analysis adjusting for traditional and nontraditional cardiovascular risk modifiers (p = 0.049). ccIMT was negatively correlated to serum concentrations of MBL (Spearman rho = -0.33, p = 0.037). This relation also remained significant in multivariable analysis (p = 0.042).
In this group of SLE patients, MBL2 low-expressing genotypes and low serum levels of MBL were correlated with ccIMT, independent of the effects of traditional and nontraditional cardiovascular risk modifiers.
PubMed ID
20595266 View in PubMed
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High incidence of potentially virus-induced malignancies in systemic lupus erythematosus: a long-term followup study in a Danish cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130948
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2011 Oct;63(10):3032-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Lene Dreyer
Mikkel Faurschou
Mette Mogensen
Søren Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. lene.dreyer@dadlnet.dk
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2011 Oct;63(10):3032-7
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Papillomavirus Infections - complications - epidemiology
Registries
Risk
Abstract
Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) seem to experience an increased prevalence of oncogenic virus infections. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether SLE patients have an increased risk of virus-associated malignancies, defined as malignancies potentially caused by virus infection.
A hospital-based cohort of 576 SLE patients was linked to the Danish Cancer Registry. The cohort was followed up for malignancies from the date of SLE diagnosis, and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for various forms of cancer.
The median duration of followup was 13.2 years. Compared to the general population, the patients experienced an increased overall risk of cancer (SIR 1.6 [95% confidence interval (95% CI)] 1.2-2.0). We observed an increased risk of virus-associated cancers combined (SIR 2.9 [95% CI 2.0-4.1]). Among human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated malignant and premalignant conditions, high risk was found for anal cancer (SIR 26.9 [95% CI 8.7-83.4]), vaginal/vulvar cancer (SIR 9.1 [95% CI 2.3-36.5]), epithelial dysplasia/carcinoma in situ of the uterine cervix (SIR 1.8 [95% CI 1.2-2.7]), and nonmelanoma skin cancer (SIR 2.0 [95% CI 1.2-3.6]). Increased SIRs were also found for other potentially virus-induced cancer types (liver cancer SIR 9.9 [95% CI 2.5-39.8], bladder cancer SIR 3.6 [95% CI 1.4-9.7], and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma SIR 5.0 [95% CI 1.9-13.3]).
The patients in this SLE cohort experienced an increased risk of HPV-associated tumors and other potentially virus-induced cancers during long-term followup. Our findings call for clinical alertness to oncogenic virus infections in SLE patients.
PubMed ID
21953088 View in PubMed
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