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[18F]altanserin binding to human 5HT2A receptors is unaltered after citalopram and pindolol challenge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9398
Source
J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 2004 Sep;24(9):1037-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Lars H Pinborg
Karen H Adams
Stig Yndgaard
Steen G Hasselbalch
Søren Holm
Heidi Kristiansen
Olaf B Paulson
Gitte M Knudsen
Author Affiliation
Neurobiology Research Unit, University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. pinborg@nru.dk
Source
J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 2004 Sep;24(9):1037-45
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - pharmacology
Adult
Brain - drug effects - metabolism
Citalopram - pharmacology
Female
Fluorine Radioisotopes - metabolism
Humans
Ketanserin - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Male
Pindolol - pharmacology
Prolactin - blood - drug effects
Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT2A - drug effects - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - pharmacology
Tomography, Emission-Computed
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to develop an experimental paradigm for the study of serotonergic neurotransmission in humans using positron emission tomography and the 5-HT2A selective radioligand [18F]altanserin. [18F]altanserin studies were conducted in seven subjects using the bolus/infusion approach designed for attaining steady state in blood and brain 2 hours after the initial [18F]altanserin administration. Three hours after commencement of radiotracer administration, 0.25 mg/kg of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, citalopram (Lundbeck, Valby, Denmark), was administered to all subjects as a constant infusion for 20 minutes. To reduce 5-HT1A-mediated autoinhibition of cortical 5-HT release, four of the seven subjects were pretreated with the partial 5-HT1A agonist pindolol for 3 days at an increasing oral dose (25 mg on the day of scanning). In each subject, the baseline condition (120 to 180 minutes) was compared with the stimulated condition (195 to 300 minutes). Despite a pronounced increase in plasma prolactin and two subjects reporting hot flushes compatible with an 5-HT-induced adverse effect, cortical [18F]altanserin binding was insensitive to the citalopram challenge, even after pindolol pretreatment. The biochemical and cellular events possibly affecting the unsuccessful translation of the citalopram/pindolol challenge into a change in 5-HT2A receptor binding of [18F]altanserin are discussed.
PubMed ID
15356424 View in PubMed
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The child as organ and tissue donor: discussions in the Danish Council of Ethics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30354
Source
Camb Q Healthc Ethics. 2004;13(2):156-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Søren Holm
Author Affiliation
University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
Source
Camb Q Healthc Ethics. 2004;13(2):156-60
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Denmark
Ethics Committees
Humans
Living Donors - ethics
Tissue Donors - ethics
PubMed ID
15124403 View in PubMed
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Death, democracy and public ethical choice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228726
Source
Bioethics. 1990 Jul;4(3):237-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1990
Author
Reid Cushman
Soren Holm
Source
Bioethics. 1990 Jul;4(3):237-52
Date
Jul-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advance Directives
Advisory Committees
Bioethical Issues
Bioethics
Brain Death
Consumer Participation
Cultural Diversity
Data Collection
Death
Decision Making
Democracy
Denmark
Embryo, Mammalian
Fetal Tissue Transplantation
Fetus
Genetic Counseling
Heart
Human Experimentation
Humans
Information Dissemination
Information Services
International Cooperation
Internationality
Jurisprudence
Mass Media
Prenatal Diagnosis
Professional Competence
Public Opinion
Public Policy
Reference Standards
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted
Social Values
Tissue Donors
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
The Danish Council of Ethics...believed that the brain-death criterion should not be accepted without public education and debate. Following the introduction of a spectrum of educational and related activites, a Gallup poll found that 98% of the survey population was aware of the debate over brain-vs-heart criteria and that 80% favoured the adoption of a supplemental brain-death standard... This raises the fundamental question of decisionmaking in pluralist democratic societies, of the limits of democratic involvement in such choices, and of the role of bodies like the Danish Council of Ethics... It must be part of the mission of a governmental bioethical body to use its peculiar expertise to teach and to lead -- to build a popular consensus out of confusion. But in doing so, such a Commission will be steering a dangerous course....
PubMed ID
11651989 View in PubMed
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How does the public perceive the motives of medical researchers for doing research?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192836
Source
Bull Med Ethics. 1999 Mar;No. 146:16-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999

PET/MRI in cancer patients: first experiences and vision from Copenhagen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117816
Source
MAGMA. 2013 Feb;26(1):37-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Andreas Kjær
Annika Loft
Ian Law
Anne Kiil Berthelsen
Lise Borgwardt
Johan Löfgren
Camilla Bardram Johnbeck
Adam Espe Hansen
Sune Keller
Søren Holm
Liselotte Højgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine & PET, University of Copenhagen, KF-4012 Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. akjaer@sund.ku.dk
Source
MAGMA. 2013 Feb;26(1):37-47
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Contrast Media - diagnostic use
Denmark
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - instrumentation - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - diagnosis - radionuclide imaging
Positron-Emission Tomography - instrumentation - methods
Radiopharmaceuticals - diagnostic use
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Combined PET/MRI systems are now commercially available and are expected to change the medical imaging field by providing combined anato-metabolic image information. We believe this will be of particular relevance in imaging of cancer patients. At the Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine & PET at Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen we installed an integrated PET/MRI in December 2011. Here, we describe our first clinical PET/MR cases and discuss some of the areas within oncology where we envision promising future application of integrated PET/MR imaging in clinical routine. Cases described include brain tumors, pediatric oncology as well as lung, abdominal and pelvic cancer. In general the cases show that PET/MRI performs well in all these types of cancer when compared to PET/CT. However, future large-scale clinical studies are needed to establish when to use PET/MRI. We envision that PET/MRI in oncology will prove to become a valuable addition to PET/CT in diagnosing, tailoring and monitoring cancer therapy in selected patient populations.
PubMed ID
23266511 View in PubMed
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Pharmaceutical information systems and possible implementations of informed consent -- developing an heuristic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118906
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2012;13:30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Thomas Ploug
Søren Holm
Author Affiliation
Centre for Applied Ethics and Philosophy of Science, Department of Communication, Aalborg University Copenhagen, A, C, Meyers Vænge, 2450, København SV, Denmark. ploug@hum.aau.dk
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2012;13:30
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beneficence
Clinical Trials as Topic - ethics - methods - standards - trends
Comprehension - ethics
Denmark
Ethics, Research
Health Information Systems - ethics - organization & administration - standards - trends
Humans
Informed Consent - ethics
Personal Autonomy
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Principle-Based Ethics
Social Justice
Abstract
Denmark has implemented a comprehensive, nationwide pharmaceutical information system, and this system has been evaluated by the Danish Council of Ethics. The system can be seen as an exemplar of a comprehensive health information system for clinical use.
The paper analyses 1) how informed consent can be implemented in the system and how different implementations create different impacts on autonomy and control of information, and 2) arguments directed towards justifying not seeking informed consent in this context.
Based on the analysis a heuristic is provided which enables a ranking and estimation of the impact on autonomy and control of information of different options for consent to entry of data into the system and use of data from the system.The danger of routinisation of consent is identified.The Danish pharmaceutical information system raises issues in relation to autonomy and control of information, issues that will also occur in relation to other similar comprehensive health information systems. Some of these issues are well understood and their impact can be judged using the heuristic which is provided. More research is, however needed in relation to routinisation of consent.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23157854 View in PubMed
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[Research misconduct: Knowledge, actions and attitudes of PhD candidates].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280584
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2016 Sep;136(17):1442-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Bjørn Hofmann
Søren Holm
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2016 Sep;136(17):1442-7
Date
Sep-2016
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Education, Medical, Graduate
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Norway
Scientific Misconduct - psychology
Students, Medical - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND Increasing attention is being paid to research misconduct in academic journals and in the media, but we know relatively little about its extent or attitudes to research misconduct, or how these are changing. This study therefore aims to investigate PhD candidates' knowledge, own actions and attitudes to specific forms of research misconduct.MATERIAL AND METHOD In autumn 2015, an anonymous questionnaire survey was distributed to all participants in the introductory course for PhD candidates at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Oslo.RESULTS Altogether 77 PhD candidates (79 %) responded to the questionnaire. A total of 62 % conducted clinical research and 25 % conducted basic research. Around one in four had heard about serious forms of research misconduct in the previous year, and around 4 % were aware of various forms of serious research misconduct in their own department in the previous year. Compared to earlier studies, an increasing number (16 %) responded that they had been subjected to unethical pressure with regard to inclusion or order of authors. Approximately two-thirds were uncertain of whether their department had written policies for academic conduct. One-third of PhD candidates did not disassociate themselves from actions that are generally viewed as scientific misconduct. One-tenth thought it acceptable to falsify or fabricate data in order to expedite publication, one-fifth did not object to taking the credit for others' ideas, and almost half did not believe it was wrong to attempt a number of methods of analysis until one arrived at a significant answer.INTERPRETATION PhD candidates at the Faculty of Medicine were aware of research misconduct, both generally and from their own department. They themselves reported some type of scientific misconduct, and a large majority were uncertain of their department's guidelines. Some of the candidates also accepted several forms of research misconduct.
PubMed ID
27686203 View in PubMed
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Scientific dishonesty--a nationwide survey of doctoral students in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117517
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2013;14:3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Bjørn Hofmann
Anne Ingeborg Myhr
Søren Holm
Author Affiliation
Centre of Medical Ethics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. b.m.hofmann@medisin.uio.no
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2013;14:3
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Deception
Ethics, Research
Humans
Norway
Plagiarism
Questionnaires
Research Personnel - ethics
Scientific Misconduct - ethics
Students, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The knowledge of scientific dishonesty is scarce and heterogeneous. Therefore this study investigates the experiences with and the attitudes towards various forms of scientific dishonesty among PhD-students at the medical faculties of all Norwegian universities.
Anonymous questionnaire distributed to all post graduate students attending introductory PhD-courses at all medical faculties in Norway in 2010/2011. Descriptive statistics.
189 of 262 questionnaires were returned (72.1%). 65% of the respondents had not, during the last year, heard or read about researchers who committed scientific dishonesty. One respondent had experienced pressure to fabricate and to falsify data, and one had experienced pressure to plagiarize data. On average 60% of the respondents were uncertain whether their department had a written policy concerning scientific conduct. About 11% of the respondents had experienced unethical pressure concerning the order of authors during the last 12?months. 10% did not find it inappropriate to report experimental data without having conducted the experiment and 38% did not find it inappropriate to try a variety of different methods of analysis to find a statistically significant result. 13% agreed that it is acceptable to selectively omit contradictory results to expedite publication and 10% found it acceptable to falsify or fabricate data to expedite publication, if they were confident of their findings. 79% agreed that they would be willing to report misconduct to a responsible official.
Although there is less scientific dishonesty reported in Norway than in other countries, dishonesty is not unknown to doctoral students. Some forms of scientific misconduct are considered to be acceptable by a significant minority. There was little awareness of relevant policies for scientific conduct, but a high level of willingness to report misconduct.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23289954 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.