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The artistry and ability of traditional women healers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185389
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2003 Apr;24(4):340-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA. strut005@tc.umn.edu
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2003 Apr;24(4):340-54
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Gender Identity
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Medicine, Traditional
Nursing Methodology Research
Questionnaires
Role
United States
Abstract
In a phenomenological research study with a purposeful sample, 6 Ojibwa and Cree indigenous women healers from Canada and the United States shared their experience of being a traditional healer. Using stories obtained during open-ended, unstructured interviews, in this article I depict the lives, backgrounds, and traditional healing practices of women who, in the past, have not been afforded an opportunity to dialogue about their healing art and abilities. The methods of these women healers, their arts and their gifts, are different from those of Western conventional medicine because of dissimilar world views related to health and illness. An increased awareness of health care providers related to the ancient art of traditional healing currently practiced in communities by gifted women who provide culturally specific holistic healing and health care is essential.
PubMed ID
12746005 View in PubMed
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The experience of being an Anishinabe man healer: ancient healing in a modern world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156448
Source
J Cult Divers. 2008;16(2):70-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Valerie S Eschiti
Beverly Patchell
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
Source
J Cult Divers. 2008;16(2):70-5
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Narration
United States
Abstract
The purpose was to understand the experience of being an Anishinabe man healer. Of particular relevance, healers explained how they provide Indigenous health care in a world dominated by Western biomedicine.
A phenomenological approach was utilized to interview four Anishinabe men healers who reside in the United States and Canada.
In-person interviews were conducted using an interview guide. The interviews were audiotaped when permitted; otherwise notes were taken. Data analysis was conducted using techniques from Colaizzi and van Manen.
Seven themes were identified: (1) The Healer's Path, (2) Health as Wholeness, (3) Healing Ways, (4) Healing Stories, (5) Culture Interwoven with Healing, (6) Healing Exchange, and (7) Connection with Western Medicine.
The themes identified inform nursing practice by pointing out the importance of culture within traditional Indigenous healing, as well as the need for a holistic approach when caring for Indigenous people. Additionally, the Indigenous men healers acknowledged their connection with Western medicine as part of the process of healing for their clients. This emphasizes the need for nurses and other health care providers to become knowledgeable regarding traditional Indigenous healing that their clients may be receiving, in order to foster open communication.
PubMed ID
20666300 View in PubMed
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The experience of being an Anishinabe man healer: ancient healing in a modern world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156015
Source
J Cult Divers. 2008;15(2):70-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Valerie S Eschiti
Beverly Patchell
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
Source
J Cult Divers. 2008;15(2):70-5
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Great Lakes Region
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - education
Health services needs and demand
Holistic Health
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Mythology - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Professional Role - psychology
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose was to understand the experience of being an Anishinabe man healer. Of particular relevance, healers explained how they provide Indigenous health care in a world dominated by Western biomedicine.
A phenomenological approach was utilized to interview four Anishinabe men healers who reside in the United States and Canada.
In-person interviews were conducted using an interview guide. The interviews were audiotaped when permitted; otherwise notes were taken. Data analysis was conducted using techniques from Colaizzi and van Manen.
Seven themes were identified: (1) The Healer's Path, (2) Health as Wholeness, (3) Healing Ways, (4) Healing Stories, (5) Culture Interwoven with Healing, (6) Healing Exchange, and (7) Connection with Western Medicine.
The themes identified inform nursing practice by pointing out the importance of culture within traditional Indigenous healing, as well as the need for a holistic approach when caring for Indigenous people. Additionally, the Indigenous men healers acknowledged their connection with Western medicine as part of the process of healing for their clients. This emphasizes the need for nurses and other health care providers to become knowledgeable regarding traditional Indigenous healing that their clients may be receiving, in order to foster open communication.
PubMed ID
18649444 View in PubMed
Less detail

The experience of indigenous traditional healing and cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180998
Source
Integr Cancer Ther. 2004 Mar;3(1):13-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Valerie S Eschiti
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota School of Nursing, Minneapolis 55455, USA. strut005@umn.edu
Source
Integr Cancer Ther. 2004 Mar;3(1):13-23
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Breast Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - therapy
Prostatic Neoplasms - therapy
Sarcoma - ethnology - therapy
Abstract
Indigenous traditional healing is an ancient, deeply rooted, complex holistic health care system practiced by indigenous people worldwide. However, scant information exists to explain the phenomenon of indigenous medicine and indigenous health. Even less is known about how indigenous healing takes place. The purpose of this study is to describe the meaning and essence of the lived experience of 4 indigenous people who have been diagnosed with cancer and have used indigenous traditional healing during their healing journey. The researcher used a qualitative phenomenological methodology to collect and analyze interview data. Interviews were conducted with 4 self-identified indigenous people, ages 49 to 61, from diverse tribes. Time since cancer diagnosis varied from 2 to 20 years; types of cancer included lung, prostate, sarcoma of the leg, and breast. Four themes and 2 subthemes emerged (1) receiving the cancer diagnosis (with subthemes of knowing something was wrong and hearing something was wrong), (2) seeking healing, (3) connecting to indigenous culture, and (4) contemplating life's future. This study demonstrates that 4 individuals with cancer integrated Western medicine and traditional healing to treat their cancer. This knowledge provides necessary data about the phenomena of being healed by indigenous healers. Such data may serve as an initial guide for health care professionals while interacting with indigenous people diagnosed with cancer. Accordingly, traditional healing may be used to decrease health disparities.
PubMed ID
15035869 View in PubMed
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The experience of native peer facilitators in the campaign against type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185829
Source
J Rural Health. 2003;19(2):174-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Felicia Schanche Hodge
Lorelei De Cora
Betty Geishirt-Cantrell
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota School of Nursing, Minneapolis 55455, USA. strut005@umn.edu
Source
J Rural Health. 2003;19(2):174-80
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Career Choice
Community Health Workers - psychology
Cultural Characteristics
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - ethnology - prevention & control
Female
Health promotion
Health Services, Indigenous - manpower
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Nebraska
Peer Group
Qualitative Research
Rural Health
South Dakota
Abstract
The use of peer facilitators in health programs has great potential. One important application is prevention and control of type 2 diabetes among American Indians.
To explore the experience of American Indian facilitators in a culturally appropriate intervention (Talking Circles) on 2 Northern Plains reservations. The Talking Circles offered a forum for educational dialogue on diabetes risk factors and the management of type 2 diabetes.
Phenomenology, a qualitative research approach, was used to answer the research question: "What did Native Talking Circle facilitators experience?" Participants were 4 lay health workers from the intervention reservations who had been trained to present a diabetes curriculum while coordinating and guiding the group discussion. During open-ended, taped interviews, the facilitators shared their experiences conducting the Talking Circles. Analysis categorized the experiences into common themes to explain the phenomena and cultural construction of oral discussions (Talking Circles) of diabetes.
Themes included the concept of "a calling" to do the work, which included a self-growth process, a blending of 2 worldviews as a diabetes intervention strategy, the importance of translating educational materials in a liaison role, and commitment to tribal people and communities.
The experience of the facilitators was positive because they were knowledgeable about American Indian culture and worldview and were trained in both Talking Circle facilitation and type 2 diabetes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12696854 View in PubMed
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Indigenous women's voices: marginalization and health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172889
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2005 Oct;16(4):339-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Joan E Dodgson
Roxanne Struthers
Author Affiliation
University of Hawaii, Manoa, USA.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2005 Oct;16(4):339-46
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cultural Diversity
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Midwestern United States
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario
Prejudice
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Alienation - psychology
Social Distance
Women - psychology
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
Marginalization may affect health care delivery. Ways in which indigenous women experienced marginalization were examined. Data from 57 indigenous women (18 to 65 years) were analyzed for themes. Three themes emerged: historical trauma as lived marginalization, biculturalism experienced as marginalization, and interacting within a complex health care system. Experienced marginalization reflected participants' unique perspective and were congruent with previous research. It is necessary for health care providers to assess the detrimental impact of marginalization on the health status of individuals and/or communities.
PubMed ID
16160196 View in PubMed
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Persistent smoking among Northern Plains Indians: lenient attitudes, low harm value, and partiality toward cigarette smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164829
Source
J Cult Divers. 2006;13(4):181-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Felicia Schanche Hodge
Roxanne Struthers
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of California at Los Angeles, 700 Tiverton, #5940 Factor Building, Los Angeles, CA 90095-7102, USA. fhodge@sonnet.ucla.edu
Source
J Cult Divers. 2006;13(4):181-5
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Focus Groups
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Education - methods
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Minnesota - epidemiology
Nebraska - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk-Taking
Smoking - ethnology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - ethnology - methods
South Dakota - epidemiology
Tobacco Use Disorder - ethnology
Abstract
Smoking rates among American Indian youth and adults are the highest in the nation. Funded by the University of Minnesota Cancer Center, the Tobacco Policies Among Plains Indians Project held focus groups on seven reservations during 2001-2002. Members of three Ojibwe reservations in Minnesota, three Sioux reservations in South Dakota, and one Winnebago reservation in Nebraska participated. Areas investigated included smoking knowledge, initiation, attitudes and behaviors, and perceptions of harm. Findings indicate that lenient attitudes toward smoking behaviors, low harm value, and partiality toward the smoking habit and the ritualistic behavior it invokes are long-standing and powerful to overcome. To initiate interventions for persistent smoking, tribes will need to target efforts toward the creation of healthy communities.
PubMed ID
17338487 View in PubMed
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Phenomenological research among Canadian and United States indigenous populations: oral tradition and quintessence of time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172585
Source
Qual Health Res. 2005 Nov;15(9):1264-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Cynthia Peden-McAlpine
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota School of Nursing, Minneapolis, USA.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2005 Nov;15(9):1264-76
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Canada
Humans
Narration
Population Groups
Qualitative Research
Social Change
United States
Abstract
Researchers conducting phenomenological studies among indigenous peoples in the United States and Canada have identified a seamless link between phenomenology and indigenous oral tradition. Phenomenology is compatible with indigenous peoples, because it is synchronous with holistic indigenous cultural lifeway and values. Phenomenology, as a research method, assists indigenous people in reproducing, through narrative communication, features of the past, present, and future. In the narrative process, this method elicits significant implicit meaning of indigenous culture and assists with recording the essence of experiences and events of indigenous societies. A product of the telling of narrative stories is the capacity to reflect on change that will enhance health in a holistic and culturally acceptable manner.
PubMed ID
16204404 View in PubMed
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Respecting tribal traditions in research and publications: voices of five Native American nurse scholars.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173647
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2005 Jul;16(3):193-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Roxanne Struthers
Jana Lauderdale
Lee Anne Nichols
Lillian Tom-Orme
C June Strickland
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, MN, USA.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2005 Jul;16(3):193-201
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Culture
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Nursing Research
Professional Competence
Transcultural Nursing - standards
United States
Abstract
A dialogue with five Native American scholars provides insight into conducting research and publishing resulting manuscripts on Native American topics, specifically healing beliefs and practices. This information provides a means to develop sensitivity and create understanding about concerns held by Native Americans regarding sharing certain defined cultural information with those outside the culture. The article identifies salient tribal issues related to research, discusses perspectives important to tribal nations and Native individuals surrounding research, and supplies a base on which to formulate further discussions.
PubMed ID
16044622 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.