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After patients are diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis, what do they do?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144212
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2010 Apr;62(4):510-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Kelly A Grindrod
Carlo A Marra
Lindsey Colley
Jolanda Cibere
Ross T Tsuyuki
John M Esdaile
Louise Gastonguay
Jacek Kopec
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2010 Apr;62(4):510-5
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
British Columbia
Chondroitin - therapeutic use
Dietary Supplements
Exercise Therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glucosamine - therapeutic use
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Orthotic Devices - utilization
Osteoarthritis, Knee - drug therapy - rehabilitation
Pharmacies
Quality of Life
Risk Reduction Behavior
Self Care
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
To learn more about the health services and products that patients use after receiving a diagnosis of knee osteoarthritis (OA), as well as the trajectory of their health-related quality of life (HRQOL).
Using a simple screening survey, community pharmacists identified 194 participants with previously undiagnosed knee OA. Of these participants, 190 were confirmed to have OA on further investigation. At baseline and 1, 3, and 6 months after diagnosis, a survey was administered to assess health services, product use, and HRQOL, including the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36) health survey, the Paper Adaptive Test (PAT-5D-QOL), and the Health Utilities Index Mark 3.
With a mean age of 63 years, participants were mostly women, white, and overweight. By 6 months, more than 90% of the participants had visited their family physician to discuss their OA, and more than 50% of participants took either prescription or nonprescription analgesics. In addition, three-quarters of the participants started exercising, one-third initiated activity aids, and one-third had started natural medicine products. At 6 months compared with baseline, significant improvements were seen in the SF-36 physical component summary (P = 0.001) and bodily pain domain scores (P = 0.02), the PAT-5D-QOL overall, pain, and usual daily activities scores (P
PubMed ID
20391506 View in PubMed
Less detail

Blood pressure kiosks for medication therapy management programs: business opportunity for pharmacists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126650
Source
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2012 Mar-Apr;52(2):188-94
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sherilyn K D Houle
Anderson W Chuck
Ross T Tsuyuki
Author Affiliation
EPICORE Centre, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2012 Mar-Apr;52(2):188-94
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Pressure Monitors
Cohort Studies
Community Pharmacy Services - economics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Drug Monitoring - economics - instrumentation
Health Care Costs
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Models, Economic
Ontario
Reimbursement Mechanisms
Abstract
To develop an economic model based on the use of pharmacy-based blood pressure kiosks for case finding of remunerable medication therapy management (MTM) opportunities.
Descriptive, exploratory, nonexperimental study.
Ontario, Canada, between January 2010 and September 2011.
More than 7.5 million blood pressure kiosk readings were taken from 341 pharmacies.
A model was developed to estimate revenues achievable by using blood pressure kiosks for 1 month to identify a cohort of patients with blood pressure of 130/80 mm Hg or more and caring for those patients during 1 year.
Revenue generated from MTM programs.
Pharmacies could generate an average of $12,270 (range $4,523-24,420) annually in revenue from billing for MTM services.
Blood pressure kiosks can be used to identify patients with elevated blood pressure who may benefit from reimbursable pharmacist cognitive services. Revenue can be reinvested to purchase automated dispensing technology or offset pharmacy technician costs to free pharmacists to provide pharmaceutical care. Improved patient outcomes, increased patient loyalty, and improved adherence are additional potential benefits.
PubMed ID
22370382 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference guidelines on heart failure, update 2009: diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis, device therapy and recent important clinical trials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152660
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 Feb;25(2):85-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Jonathan G Howlett
Robert S McKelvie
J Malcolm O Arnold
Jeannine Costigan
Paul Dorian
Anique Ducharme
Estrellita Estrella-Holder
Justin A Ezekowitz
Nadia Giannetti
Haissam Haddad
George A Heckman
Anthony M Herd
Debra Isaac
Philip Jong
Simon Kouz
Peter Liu
Elizabeth Mann
Gordon W Moe
Ross T Tsuyuki
Heather J Ross
Michel White
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta. howlettjonathan@gmail.com
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 Feb;25(2):85-105
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Canada
Clinical Trials as Topic
Consensus Development Conferences as Topic
Heart Failure - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology - therapy
Humans
Myocarditis - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology - therapy
Risk factors
Societies, Medical
Ventricular Dysfunction, Right - diagnosis - therapy
Abstract
The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations on the diagnosis and management of heart failure in January 2006. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops and through active solicitation of stakeholders, several topics were identified because of their importance to the practicing clinician. Topics chosen for the present update include best practices for the diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis and device therapy, and a review of recent important or landmark clinical trials. These recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence adopted and previously described by the Society. The present update has been written from a clinical perspective to provide a user-friendly and practical approach. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: What is right-sided heart failure and how should one approach the diagnostic work-up? What other clinical entities may masquerade as this nebulous condition and how can we tell them apart? When should we be concerned about the presence of myocarditis and how quickly should patients with this condition be referred to an experienced centre? Among the myriad of recently published landmark clinical trials, which ones will impact our standards of clinical care? The goals are to aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients, resulting in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19214293 View in PubMed
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Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference recommendations on heart failure update 2007: Prevention, management during intercurrent illness or acute decompensation, and use of biomarkers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165499
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2007 Jan;23(1):21-45
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
J Malcom O Arnold
Jonathan G Howlett
Paul Dorian
Anique Ducharme
Nadia Giannetti
Haissam Haddad
George A Heckman
Andrew Ignaszewski
Debra Isaac
Philip Jong
Peter Liu
Elizabeth Mann
Robert S McKelvie
Gordon W Moe
John D Parker
Anna M Svendsen
Ross T Tsuyuki
Kelly O'Halloran
Heather J Ross
Vivek Rao
Errol J Sequeira
Michel White
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. malcolm.arnold@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2007 Jan;23(1):21-45
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Biological Markers
Canada
Cardiac Output, Low - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Chronic Disease
Comorbidity
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health Priorities
Heart Failure - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Humans
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Risk factors
Abstract
Heart failure is common, yet it is difficult to treat. It presents in many different guises and circumstances in which therapy needs to be individualized. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations in January 2006 on the diagnosis and management of heart failure, and the present update builds on those core recommendations. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops during 2006, several topics were identified as priorities because of the challenges they pose to health care professionals. New evidence-based recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence adopted and previously described by the Society. Specific recommendations and practical tips were written for the prevention of heart failure, the management of heart failure during intercurrent illness, the treatment of acute heart failure, and the current and future roles of biomarkers in heart failure care. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: which patients should be identified as being at high risk of developing heart failure and which interventions should be used? What complications can occur in heart failure patients during an intercurrent illness, how should these patients be monitored and which medications may require a dose adjustment or discontinuation? What are the best therapeutic, both drug and nondrug, strategies for patients with acute heart failure? How can new biomarkers help in the treatment of heart failure, and when and how should BNP be measured in heart failure patients? The goals of the present update are to translate best evidence into practice, to apply clinical wisdom where evidence for specific strategies is weaker, and to aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients to result in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17245481 View in PubMed
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Changes in adherence to evidence-based medications in the first year after initial hospitalization for heart failure: observational cohort study from 1994 to 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146518
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2009 May;2(3):228-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Darcy A Lamb
Dean T Eurich
Finlay A McAlister
Ross T Tsuyuki
William M Semchuk
Thomas W Wilson
David F Blackburn
Author Affiliation
College of Pharmacy & Nutrition and the College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2009 May;2(3):228-35
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers - therapeutic use
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Databases, Factual
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - drug therapy
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Multivariate Analysis
Patient Discharge
Polypharmacy
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Abstract
The use of evidence-based medications in patients with heart failure has increased over the past 10 years. We aimed to determine whether adherence to these medications has also increased during this time.
A retrospective cohort was created using administrative databases from the province of Saskatchewan, Canada. Subjects discharged alive from their first hospitalization for heart failure between 1994 and 2003 were eligible. Those filling a prescription for a beta-blocker (BB), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) within 6 months of discharge were followed for 1 year after the initial prescription. Of 8805 eligible patients, 67% of BB users (941/1414) and 74% of ACEI/ARB users (4441/5991) exhibited optimal adherence at 1 year (defined as >or=80% adherence calculated from pharmacy refill records). When grouped by year of initial heart failure hospitalization, the proportion of optimally adherent patients improved from 54% to 75% with BB and from 67% to 80% with ACEI/ARBs between 1994/1995 and 2002/2003 (P for trend
PubMed ID
20031842 View in PubMed
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Coding of heart failure diagnoses in Saskatchewan: a validation study of hospital discharge abstracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131487
Source
J Popul Ther Clin Pharmacol. 2011;18(3):e407-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
David F Blackburn
Greg Shnell
Darcy A Lamb
Ross T Tsuyuki
Mary Rose Stang
Thomas W Wilson
Author Affiliation
College of Pharmacy & Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Canada. d.blackburn@usask.ca
Source
J Popul Ther Clin Pharmacol. 2011;18(3):e407-15
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Clinical Coding - standards
Cohort Studies
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - epidemiology
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Male
Patient Discharge - standards
Retrospective Studies
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Abstract
Validity of Heart Failure (HF) diagnoses from administrative records has not been extensively evaluated, especially with respect to small / unselected hospitals.
To determine the positive predictive value of a primary / most responsible diagnosis of HF among a general population of subjects discharged from Saskatchewan hospitals.
Using administrative health records from the Province of Saskatchewan, Canada, we identified subjects experiencing their first HF hospitalization between 1994 and 2003. From this cohort, we randomly selected 500 subjects for individual validation using Framingham and Carlson criteria.
The 466 charts available for analysis, 74% (345/466) and 63.9% (298/466) of subjects met criteria for a clinical diagnosis of HF based on Framingham or Carlson criteria, respectively; 57.5% (268/466) met both criterion. Provincial hospitals (located in the largest urban centres) were associated with the highest proportion of confirmed HF diagnoses (87.8% by Framingham criteria) compared to progressively smaller hospitals (regional 77.9%; district 64.2%; and community 60.0%). Accuracy also differed when stratified by physician category. Cardiologists and internists were associated with the highest rates of confirmed diagnoses [(97.5% (39 / 40) and 85.0% (34 / 40)]) compared to general practitioners [(73.1% (95 / 130)]) and other physicians [(69.1% (177 / 256)]), by Framingham criteria.
Hospital discharge abstracts indicating HF are frequently inaccurate. These findings have important implications for the epidemiologic study of HF as well as the clinical management of patients.
PubMed ID
21900705 View in PubMed
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Contemporary burden of illness of congestive heart failure in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185751
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2003 Mar 31;19(4):436-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-2003
Author
Ross T Tsuyuki
Marcelo C Shibata
Carolyn Nilsson
Marilou Hervas-Malo
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Coordinating and Research, Division of Cardiology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. ross.tsuyuki@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2003 Mar 31;19(4):436-8
Date
Mar-31-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cost of Illness
Female
Heart Failure - economics - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Congestive heart failure (CHF) is associated with high morbidity and mortality; however, there is little contemporary Canadian data to quantify the burden of this illness.
To report the impact of CHF in Canada, as measured by hospitalizations.
Data were obtained from the Canadian Institute for Health Information on patients hospitalized with CHF as a most responsible, primary or complication diagnosis during fiscal year 2000/01.
There were a total of 106,130 discharges for 85,679 CHF patients in the fiscal year 2000/01. Total in-hospital mortality was 15.8%. In terms of total discharges for CHF, 32.7% were readmissions. On an individual patient basis, 19.9% of patients were rehospitalized once or more during 2000. In terms of burden of illness of CHF compared with other major illnesses, CHF is associated with the second highest total number of hospital days and third highest number of patients affected.
Hospitalization for CHF occurs frequently and accounts for a large number of hospital bed-days in Canada. These figures should signal a call to action for researchers, administrators and health care providers regarding the need for more efficacious therapies, better application of already-proven therapies and patient education.
PubMed ID
12704492 View in PubMed
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Development and validation of a survey to assess barriers to drug use in patients with chronic heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188619
Source
Pharmacotherapy. 2002 Sep;22(9):1163-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Scot H Simpson
Jeffrey A Johnson
Karen B Farris
Ross T Tsuyuki
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Economics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. ssimpson@ihe.ab.ca
Source
Pharmacotherapy. 2002 Sep;22(9):1163-72
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta
Attitude
Cardiovascular Agents - therapeutic use
Chronic Disease
Communication Barriers
Community Pharmacy Services
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Drug Utilization
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Heart Failure - drug therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Scot H. Simpson, Pharm.D., M.Sc., Jeffrey A. Johnson, Ph.D., Karen B. Farris, Ph.D., and Ross T. Tsuyuki, Pharm.D., M.Sc. Objective. To report the development of and initial experience with a survey designed to assess patient-perceived barriers to drug use in ambulatory patients with heart failure. Methods. The Barriers to Medication Use (BMU) survey, developed from previous qualitative work by our group, was administered to 128 consecutive patients attending an outpatient heart failure clinic. The first 42 patients to return the survey were mailed a second survey to evaluate response stability over time. The survey contained 31 questions in five barrier domains (knowledge, previous drug therapy experiences, social support, communication, and relationship with health care professionals). Patients also completed the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure (MLHF) questionnaire and a self-reported drug use scale. Frequency of drug refills was used to estimate adherence. Reliability and construct validity of the BMU survey were assessed using correlation coefficients. Results. Response rates were 89% and 93% for the first and retest surveys, respectively The BMU survey showed modest internal consistency in the overall survey and in two of the five barrier domains. Responses to the first and retest surveys showed good stability over time in the overall survey and in four of the five barrier domains. Patients with good adherence reported few barriers; however, the association was not strong (Pearson correlation coefficient r = -0.14, p=0.14). Patients who reported few barriers also reported better MLHF scores (r = 0.42, p
PubMed ID
12222552 View in PubMed
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Economic implications of treatment guidelines for congestive heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171579
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Dec;21(14):1301-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Marcelo C Shibata
Carolyn Nilsson
Marilou Hervas-Malo
Philip Jacobs
Ross T Tsuyuki
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Dec;21(14):1301-6
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - economics - therapeutic use
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - economics - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Databases as Topic - economics
Digoxin - economics - therapeutic use
Drug Costs - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization Review - economics
Guideline Adherence - economics
Heart Failure - drug therapy - economics - epidemiology
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Spironolactone - economics - therapeutic use
Abstract
Congestive heart failure (CHF) is the most common cause of cardiovascular hospital admission. A significant proportion of the costs of CHF is due to hospitalizations. The present study evaluated the economic impact of a modest increase in the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, beta-blockers, spironolactone and digoxin on CHF hospitalizations. Patients with CHF were identified through the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) database. The efficacy of ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers, spironolactone and digoxin in the first year of treatment were retrieved from the Survival and Ventricular Enlargement (SAVE) trial, a meta-analysis, the Randomized Aldactone Evaluation Study (RALES) and the Digitalis Investigation Group (DIG) trial, respectively. Cost of CHF hospitalization was based on the National List of Provincial Costs. Costs of drug treatment were based on the 2002 Alberta Health and Wellness Drug Benefit list. Physician visits for drug titration were also included in the model. A total of 85,679 patients with CHF were identified with a total of 106,130 hospital discharges. A 10% increase in use of ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers, spironolactone and digoxin would incur in a total cost due to avoidable hospital admissions of 0.4 million dollars, 1.3 million dollars, 3.7 million dollars and 1.2 million dollars, respectively. Similarly, the costs of drug treatment would be 2.2 million dollars, 1.3 million dollars, 0.3 million dollars and 0.5 million dollars, respectively. An increase in the use of the above medications would save 6.6 million dollars due to avoidable hospital admissions. The total cost of drug treatment was 4.3 million dollars, giving a net savings of 2.3 million dollars in the first year. The implementation of evidence-based therapy for CHF treatment is not only clinically efficacious, but also economically attractive.
PubMed ID
16341301 View in PubMed
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The effect of 1 month of therapy with midodrine, octreotide-LAR and albumin in refractory ascites: a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157096
Source
Liver Int. 2009 Feb;29(2):169-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Puneeta Tandon
Ross T Tsuyuki
Lesley Mitchell
Michael Hoskinson
Mang M Ma
Winnie W Wong
Andrew L Mason
Klaus Gutfreund
Vincent G Bain
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ptandon@ualberta.ca
Source
Liver Int. 2009 Feb;29(2):169-74
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Albumins - therapeutic use
Aldosterone - blood
Analysis of Variance
Ascites - drug therapy
Creatine - pharmacokinetics
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Clearance Rate
Middle Aged
Midodrine - therapeutic use
Octreotide - therapeutic use
Pilot Projects
Prospective Studies
Radioimmunoassay
Radioisotope Renography
Renin - blood
Abstract
The pathogenesis of refractory ascites (RA) is linked to splanchnic vasodilation. We hypothesized that a combination of midodrine, octreotide long-acting release (LAR) and albumin would result in increased natriuresis, better control of ascites and an improvement in renal function in patients with RA+/-Type 2 hepatorenal syndrome.
A prospective pilot study in patients with RA as defined by the International Ascites Club. Consecutive patients received an intramuscular injection of octreotide-LAR, 50 g of albumin three times per week and midodrine titrated to increase the systolic blood pressure for 1 month.
Ten patients with RA were enrolled and eight with complete data to 1 month post-treatment were included in the analysis. There was no change in renal function but there was a trend towards a reduction in the volume of ascites removed by paracentesis (P=0.08) and a significant reduction in the plasma renin (P=0.01) and aldosterone concentrations (P=0.01). Interestingly, there was a transient worsening in the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score (P=0.01). The deterioration in MELD was completely reversible after discontinuation of therapy.
To our knowledge, this is the first study of prolonged midodrine, octreotide and albumin therapy in RA. We observed a significant reduction in the plasma renin and aldosterone concentrations and a trend towards a reduction in the volume of ascites removed by paracentesis without an effect on renal function. The beneficial effects are at the expense of a reversible deterioration in the MELD score. Large controlled trials are needed before this therapy can be routinely recommended.
PubMed ID
18492024 View in PubMed
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