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Atrial fibrillation among patients under investigation for suspected obstructive sleep apnea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285080
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(2):e0171575
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Tijn Hendrikx
Martin Sundqvist
Herbert Sandström
Carin Sahlin
Morteza Rohani
Faris Al-Khalili
Rolf Hörnsten
Anders Blomberg
Per Wester
Mårten Rosenqvist
Karl A Franklin
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(2):e0171575
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Patient Outcome Assessment
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - complications - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Obstructive sleep apnea is common among patients with atrial fibrillation, but the prevalence and risk factors for atrial fibrillation among patients who are being investigated on suspicion of sleep apnea are not well known. The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of atrial fibrillation among patients investigated for suspected obstructive sleep apnea and to identify risk factors for atrial fibrillation among them.
The prevalence of atrial fibrillation was investigated among 201 patients referred for suspected obstructive sleep apnea. Patients without known atrial fibrillation were investigated with a standard 12-lead ECG at hospital and short intermittent handheld ECG recordings at home, during 14 days.
Atrial fibrillation occurred in 13 of 201 subjects (6.5%), and in 12 of 61 men aged 60 years and older (20%). The prevalence of atrial fibrillation increased with sleep apnea severity (p = 0.038). All patients with atrial fibrillation were men and all had sleep apnea. Age 60 or older, the occurrence of central sleep apnea and diabetes mellitus were independent risk factors for atrial fibrillation after adjustments for body mass index, gender, sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease.
Atrial fibrillation is common among subjects referred for sleep apnea investigation and the prevalence of atrial fibrillation increases with sleep apnea severity. Independent risk factors for atrial fibrillation among patients investigated for suspected obstructive sleep apnea include the occurrence of coexisting central sleep apnea, age 60 years or older and diabetes mellitus.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28178304 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in heart rate variability among RF plastic sealer operators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167299
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 2007 Jan;28(1):76-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Jonna Wilén
Urban Wiklund
Rolf Hörnsten
Monica Sandström
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Working Life, Umeå, Sweden. jonna@niwl.se
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 2007 Jan;28(1):76-9
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Heart Rate - physiology - radiation effects
Humans
Industry - statistics & numerical data
Male
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Plastics
Radio Waves
Relative Biological Effectiveness
Risk Assessment - methods
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In a previous study, we showed that operators of radiofrequency (RF) plastic sealers, RF operators (n = 35) had a lower heart rate during nighttime compared to a control group (n = 37). We have analyzed the heart rate variability (HRV) on the same group of people to better understand the possible underlying rhythm disturbances. We found a significantly increased total HRV and very low frequency (VLF) power during nighttime among the RF operators compared to a control group. Together with our previous finding of a significantly lower heart rate during nighttime among the RF operators compared to the controls, this finding indicates a relative increase in parasympathetic cardiac modulation in RF operators. This could in turn be due to an adaptation of the thermoregulatory system and the cardiac autonomic modulation to a long-term low-level thermal exposure in the RF operators.
PubMed ID
17004240 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of quantitative sensory testing and heart rate variability in Swedish Val30Met ATTR.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130095
Source
Amyloid. 2011 Dec;18(4):183-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Victoria Heldestad
Urban Wiklund
Rolf Hörnsten
Konen Obayashi
Ole B Suhr
Erik Nordh
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neurosciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Amyloid. 2011 Dec;18(4):183-90
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Amyloid - metabolism
Amyloidosis, Familial - metabolism - physiopathology
Female
Foot - physiopathology
Heart rate
Humans
Leg - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prealbumin - metabolism
Sweden
Thermosensing
Abstract
Patients with transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR) polyneuropathy, a hereditary fatal disease, often report defects in both thermal perception and autonomic nervous system function as their first clinical symptoms. While elevated thermal perception thresholds (TPT) for cold and warmth only recently have been shown as an early marker of small nerve fiber dysfunction in these patients, heart rate variability (HRV) has frequently been used to quantify autonomic neuropathy. The main purpose with this report was to elucidate a possible relationship between estimates of HRV and TPT in a selected group of early and late-onset Swedish Val30Met ATTR patients. The results show significantly more pronounced elevation of TPT in early compared to late-onset patients. Significant correlations between HRV and TPT were found among late-onset cases, indicating a possible relationship between loss of thin nerve fibers in somatic and autonomic nerves, while generally no such relationships were found among early-onset cases. This observation emphasizes the importance of testing both HRV and TPT to ensure optimal early detection of neuropathic changes in an as wide as possible range of small nerve fibers in suspected ATTR patients. This is of particular importance as the phenotype of the ATTR disease varies between groups with different age of onset.
PubMed ID
22035563 View in PubMed
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Continuous development of arrhythmia is observed in Swedish transplant patients with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (amyloidogenic transthyretin Val30Met variant).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137473
Source
Liver Transpl. 2011 Feb;17(2):122-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Sadahisa Okamoto
Rolf Hörnsten
Konen Obayashi
Priyantha Wijayatunga
Ole B Suhr
Author Affiliation
Departments of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Liver Transpl. 2011 Feb;17(2):122-8
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Amyloid Neuropathies, Familial - genetics - mortality - surgery
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - genetics - mortality - therapy
Cardiac Pacing, Artificial
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Liver Transplantation - adverse effects - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Prealbumin - genetics
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
In patients with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP), heart complications are prognostic factors for mortality and morbidity after liver transplantation (LT). However, only a few studies have analyzed the development of arrhythmia in transplant patients with FAP. We investigated the development of arrhythmia requiring pacemaker insertion (PMI) in Swedish transplant patients with FAP, and we related the findings to gender, age at disease onset, and survival. One hundred four transplant patients with the amyloidogenic transthyretin Val30Met mutation were included in the study. Twenty-six (25%) received a pacemaker during the observation period (a median of 11 years after disease onset). This frequency was comparable to that noted in a previous study describing the natural course of FAP. No significant differences in PMI between early-onset cases (
PubMed ID
21280184 View in PubMed
Less detail

Electromagnetic field exposure and health among RF plastic sealer operators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53425
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 2004 Jan;25(1):5-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Jonna Wilén
Rolf Hörnsten
Monica Sandström
Per Bjerle
Urban Wiklund
Olov Stensson
Eugene Lyskov
Kjell Hansson Mild
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Working Life, Umeå, Sweden. jonna.wilen@niwl.se
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 2004 Jan;25(1):5-15
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arrhythmia - epidemiology
Body Burden
Comorbidity
Electromagnetic fields
Fatigue - epidemiology
Female
Headache - epidemiology
Humans
Industry
Male
Occupational Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - epidemiology
Radiometry - methods - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Operators of RF plastic sealers (RF operators) are an occupational category highly exposed to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. The aim of the present study was to make an appropriate exposure assessment of RF welding and examine the health status of the operators. In total, 35 RF operators and 37 controls were included. The leakage fields (electric and magnetic field strength) were measured, as well as induced and contact current. Information about welding time and productivity was used to calculate time integrated exposure. A neurophysiological examination and 24 h ECG were also carried out. The participants also had to answer a questionnaire about subjective symptoms. The measurements showed that RF operators were exposed to rather intense electric and magnetic fields. The mean values of the calculated 6 min, spatially averaged E and H field strengths, in line with ICNIRP reference levels, are 107 V/m and 0.24 A/m, respectively. The maximum measured field strengths were 2 kV/m and 1.5 A/m, respectively. The induced current in ankles and wrists varied, depending on the work situation, with a mean value of 101 mA and a maximum measured value of 1 A. In total, 11 out of 46 measured RF plastic sealers exceeded the ICNIRP reference levels. RF operators, especially the ready made clothing workers had a slightly disturbed two-point discrimination ability compared to a control group. A nonsignificant difference between RF operators and controls was found in the prevalence of subjective symptoms, but the time integrated exposure parameters seem to be of importance to the prevalence of some subjective symptoms: fatigue, headaches, and warmth sensations in the hands. Further, RF operators had a significantly lower heart rate (24 h registration) and more episodes of bradycardia compared to controls.
PubMed ID
14696048 View in PubMed
Less detail

Holter ECG monitoring in patients with perceived electrical hypersensitivity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183578
Source
Int J Psychophysiol. 2003 Sep;49(3):227-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Monica Sandström
Eugene Lyskov
Rolf Hörnsten
Kjell Hansson Mild
Urban Wiklund
Peter Rask
Vasily Klucharev
Berndt Stenberg
Per Bjerle
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Working Life, P.O. Box 7654, S-907 13, Umea, Sweden. monsand@niwl.se
Source
Int J Psychophysiol. 2003 Sep;49(3):227-35
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory - methods - statistics & numerical data
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Perception - physiology
Abstract
Earlier studies have indicated that patients claiming to be sensitive to electromagnetic fields, so-called electrical hypersensitivity (EHS), have a dysbalance of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation. This paper focuses on a possible dysbalance in the ANS among EHS patients by the use of long-term monitoring of electrocardiogram (ECG) in both a patient and a matched control group. At the same time, the environmental power frequency magnetic field was recorded for both groups in order to see if there was any difference in exposure between the groups. ECG, heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) as well as the magnetic field exposure were monitored for 24 h. Fourteen patients with perceived EHS symptoms were selected from the University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. Symptoms indicating autonomic nervous dysregulation were not part of the inclusion criteria of the patient group. Age and sex matched healthy subjects were used as controls. No differences were found between the groups regarding magnetic field exposure or the mean HR for 24 h. The HRV analyses showed that the high-frequency (HF) component did not have the expected increase with sleep onset and during nighttime in the EHS group. When separating the sleeping and awake time even less differences between the two conditions in the EHS patients, both for the low-frequency and HF components in the HRV spectrum, were seen. EHS patients had a disturbed pattern of circadian rhythms of HRV and showed a relatively 'flat' representation of hourly-recorded spectral power of the HF component of HRV.
PubMed ID
14507441 View in PubMed
Less detail

Intermittent short ECG recording is more effective than 24-hour Holter ECG in detection of arrhythmias.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256783
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2014;14:41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Tijn Hendrikx
Mårten Rosenqvist
Per Wester
Herbert Sandström
Rolf Hörnsten
Author Affiliation
Family Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden. tijn.hendrikx@fammed.umu.se.
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2014;14:41
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - diagnosis - physiopathology
Atrial Fibrillation - diagnosis - physiopathology
Atrioventricular Block - diagnosis - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electrocardiography - methods
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Female
Heart rate
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Tachycardia, Supraventricular - diagnosis - physiopathology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Many patients report symptoms of palpitations or dizziness/presyncope. These patients are often referred for 24-hour Holter ECG, although the sensitivity for detecting relevant arrhythmias is comparatively low. Intermittent short ECG recording over a longer time period might be a convenient and more sensitive alternative. The objective of this study is to compare the efficacy of 24-hour Holter ECG with intermittent short ECG recording over four weeks to detect relevant arrhythmias in patients with palpitations or dizziness/presyncope.
prospective, observational, cross-sectional study.
Clinical Physiology, University Hospital.
108 consecutive patients referred for ambiguous palpitations or dizziness/presyncope.
All individuals underwent a 24-hour Holter ECG and additionally registered 30-second handheld ECG (Zenicor EKG® thumb) recordings at home, twice daily and when having cardiac symptoms, during 28 days.
Significant arrhythmias: atrial fibrillation (AF), paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT), atrioventricular (AV) block II-III, sinus arrest (SA), wide complex tachycardia (WCT).
95 patients, 42 men and 53 women with a mean age of 54.1 years, completed registrations. Analysis of Holter registrations showed atrial fibrillation (AF) in two patients and atrioventricular (AV) block II in one patient (= 3.2% relevant arrhythmias [95% CI 1.1-8.9]). Intermittent handheld ECG detected nine patients with AF, three with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) and one with AV-block-II (= 13.7% relevant arrhythmias [95% CI 8.2-22.0]). There was a significant difference between the two methods in favour of intermittent ECG with regard to the ability to detect relevant arrhythmias (P = 0.0094). With Holter ECG, no symptoms were registered during any of the detected arrhythmias. With intermittent ECG, symptoms were registered during half of the arrhythmia episodes.
Intermittent short ECG recording during four weeks is more effective in detecting AF and PSVT in patients with ambiguous symptoms arousing suspicions of arrhythmia than 24-hour Holter ECG.
PubMed ID
24690488 View in PubMed
Less detail

Liver transplantation does not prevent the development of life-threatening arrhythmia in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy, Portuguese-type (ATTR Val30Met) patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53306
Source
Transplantation. 2004 Jul 15;78(1):112-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2004
Author
Rolf Hörnsten
Urban Wiklund
Bert-Ove Olofsson
Steen M Jensen
Ole B Suhr
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Clinical Physiology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Transplantation. 2004 Jul 15;78(1):112-6
Date
Jul-15-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amyloid Neuropathies, Familial - genetics - surgery
Arrhythmia - diagnosis - genetics - prevention & control
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Liver Transplantation
Male
Middle Aged
Point Mutation
Prealbumin - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is today the only available treatment to halt the progress of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP). Because heart arrhythmia and conduction disturbances are well-known manifestations of FAP, the aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence and development of heart conduction and rhythm disturbances in Swedish FAP patients who underwent liver transplantation. METHODS: Ambulatory 24-hour electrocardiography (ECG) recordings (Holter-ECGs) were available from 30 patients, who had been investigated before and reexamined after OLT. RESULTS.: The number of patients with abnormalities on their ECG recordings increased after OLT. Four patients developed serious arrhythmia after transplantation that necessitated the insertion of a pacemaker 40 months or longer after OLT. CONCLUSIONS: The development of cardiac conduction disturbances and arrhythmias appear not to be halted by liver transplantation, indicating that the physician should be aware of the potential risk for FAP patients receiving transplants to develop fatal arrhythmia. The follow-up after liver transplantation should include Holter-ECG recordings.
PubMed ID
15257048 View in PubMed
Less detail

Screening for atrial fibrillation with baseline and intermittent ECG recording in an out-of-hospital population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259403
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2013;13:41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Tijn Hendrikx
Rolf Hörnsten
Mårten Rosenqvist
Herbert Sandström
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2013;13:41
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - diagnosis
Atrial Fibrillation - diagnosis
Atrioventricular Block - diagnosis
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - methods
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dizziness - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Prospective Studies
Sinus Arrest, Cardiac - diagnosis
Sweden
Syncope - etiology
Tachycardia, Supraventricular - diagnosis
Young Adult
Abstract
the objective of this study is to investigate the detection rate of undiagnosed atrial fibrillation (AF) with short intermittent ECG recordings during four weeks among out-of-hospital patients, having at least one additional risk factor (CHADS2) for stroke.
Cross-sectional study.
Eight family practice centres and two hospital-based out-patient clinics in Sweden.
989 out-of-hospital patients, without known AF, having one or more risk factors associated with stroke (CHADS2).
All individuals were asked to perform 10-second handheld ECG recordings during 28 days, twice daily and when having palpitations.
Episodes of AF on handheld ECG recordings were defined as irregular supraventricular extrasystoles in series with a duration of 10 seconds.
928 patients completed registration. AF was found in 35 of 928 patients; 3.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.7-5.2). These 35 patients had a mean age of 70.7 years (SD?±?7.7; range 53-85) and a median CHADS2 of 2 (range 1-4).
Intermittent handheld ECG recording over a four week period had a detection rate of 3.8% newly diagnosed AF, in a population of 928 out-of-hospital patients having at least one additional risk factor for stroke. Intermittent handheld ECG registration is a feasible method to detect AF in patients with an increased risk of stroke in whom oral anticoagulation (OAC) treatment is indicated.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23758799 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ventricular late potentials in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76253
Source
J Electrocardiol. 2006 Jan;39(1):57-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Rolf Hörnsten
Urban Wiklund
Ole B Suhr
Steen M Jensen
Author Affiliation
Clinical Physiology, Heart Centre, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. rolf.hornsten@vll.se
Source
J Electrocardiol. 2006 Jan;39(1):57-62
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Amyloid Neuropathies, Familial - complications - physiopathology
Arrhythmia - diagnosis - etiology
Electrocardiography
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Ventricular Function, Left - physiology
Abstract
We investigated the occurrence of ventricular late potentials (LPs) in patients with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) and the possible association with ventricular arrhythmia on Holter electrocardiography and echocardiographic data. Fifty-five patients and 94 healthy controls were studied. LP were found in 46% of the FAP patients older than 60 years and in 15% of the controls (P = .02), whereas no difference was found in individuals younger than 60 years. The occurrence of LP was associated with nonsustained ventricular arrhythmia in the older FAP patients (P = .04). Older patients with LP had increased ventricular septum thickness (P = .02) and left posterior wall thickness (P = .01), as compared with those without LP. In conclusion, ventricular LPs are common in the FAP patients older than 60 years and associated with nonsustained ventricular arrhythmia and increased thickness of the left ventricular wall. Long-term follow-up studies are required to find the prognostic significance of these new findings.
PubMed ID
16387053 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.