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Air pollution and emergency department visits for otitis media: a case-crossover study in Edmonton, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141881
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Nov;118(11):1631-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Roger Zemek
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Brian H Rowe
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario and University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Nov;118(11):1631-6
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Alberta
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Child, Preschool
Cross-Over Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Humans
Infant
Inhalation Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Odds Ratio
Otitis Media - epidemiology
Ozone - analysis
Particle Size
Particulate Matter - analysis
Risk factors
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis
Weather
Abstract
Otitis media (OM) is one of the most common early childhood infections, resulting in an enormous economic burden to the health care system through unscheduled doctor visits and antibiotic prescriptions.
The objective of this study was to investigate the potential association between ambient air pollution exposure and emergency department (ED) visits for OM.
Ten years of ED data were obtained from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, and linked to levels of air pollution: carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3), sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter (PM) of median aerometric diameter
Notes
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PubMed ID
20663739 View in PubMed
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The HEADS-ED: a rapid mental health screening tool for pediatric patients in the emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122349
Source
Pediatrics. 2012 Aug;130(2):e321-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Mario Cappelli
Clare Gray
Roger Zemek
Paula Cloutier
Allison Kennedy
Elizabeth Glennie
Guy Doucet
John S Lyons
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, ON K1H 8L1 Canada. cappelli@cheo.on.ca
Source
Pediatrics. 2012 Aug;130(2):e321-7
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adolescent
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - organization & administration
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Ontario
Peer Group
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation
Reproducibility of Results
Social Environment
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Suicidal ideation
Abstract
The American Academy of Pediatrics called for action for improved screening of mental health issues in the emergency department (ED). We developed the rapid screening tool home, education, activities/peers, drugs/alcohol, suicidality, emotions/behavior, discharge resources (HEADS-ED), which is a modification of "HEADS," a mnemonic widely used to obtain a psychosocial history in adolescents. The reliability and validity of the tool and its potential for use as a screening measure are presented.
ED patients presenting with mental health concerns from March 1 to May 30, 2011 were included. Crisis intervention workers completed the HEADS-ED and the Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths-Mental Health tool (CANS MH) and patients completed the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI). Interrater reliability was assessed by using a second HEADS-ED rater for 20% of the sample.
A total of 313 patients were included, mean age was 14.3 (SD 2.63), and there were 182 females (58.1%). Interrater reliability was 0.785 (P
PubMed ID
22826567 View in PubMed
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Physician management of pediatric mental health patients in the emergency department: assessment, charting, and disposition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121204
Source
Pediatr Emerg Care. 2012 Sep;28(9):835-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Mario Cappelli
J Elizabeth Glennie
Paula Cloutier
Allison Kennedy
Melissa Vloet
Amanda Newton
Roger Zemek
Clare Gray
Author Affiliation
Mental Health Patient Service Unit, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Canada. Cappelli@cheo.on.ca
Source
Pediatr Emerg Care. 2012 Sep;28(9):835-41
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Documentation - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Ontario
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The focus of this study was to describe the clinical data that pediatric emergentologists recorded and how they were used in the mental health (MH) care of patients.
A structured chart review was conducted for all MH presentations to a pediatric emergency department in 2007. Three research assistants extracted clinical chart data and completed the Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths Tool.
The clinical records of 495 children and youth were reviewed. Emergentologists referred 124 (25.4%) for a psychiatric consult, and 46 (37%) of these patients were admitted to either an inpatient psychiatric or eating-disorders unit. Psychosis, suicide risk, eating disturbance, anxiety, and resistance to treatment predicted admission to the psychiatric inpatient unit or the eating-disorders unit. Of the 365 patients discharged back to the community, the majority (n = 189, 51.8%) were referred back to their family physician. For 117 patients (32%), there was no discharge documentation in the medical chart. Age, parent present, currently on medication, currently receiving counseling, depression, anxiety, and adjustment to trauma predicted provision of charted recommendation.
This study revealed that the pediatric emergentologists' charting of MH patients is inconsistent and incomplete. Although recorded clinical data predicted psychiatric consultation and disposition for these patients, missing data were evident in a significant number of records. The results of the study point to a need to develop a more uniform approach to the collection and recording of clinical data for MH patients.
PubMed ID
22929135 View in PubMed
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Practice patterns in asthma discharge pharmacotherapy in pediatric emergency departments: a pediatric emergency research Canada study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120704
Source
Acad Emerg Med. 2012 Sep;19(9):E1019-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Suzanne Schuh
Roger Zemek
Amy Plint
Karen J L Black
Stephen Freedman
Robert Porter
Serge Gouin
David W Johnson
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. suzanne.schuh@sickkids.ca
Source
Acad Emerg Med. 2012 Sep;19(9):E1019-26
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Administration, Oral
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - administration & dosage
Age Factors
Albuterol - administration & dosage
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - administration & dosage
Asthma - diagnosis - drug therapy
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Continuity of Patient Care
Databases, Factual
Emergency Medicine - standards - trends
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Metered Dose Inhalers
Odds Ratio
Patient Discharge
Physician's Practice Patterns
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The objective was to examine utilization of ß2 agonists via metered dose inhalers with oral and inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) at discharge in children with acute asthma.
This was a retrospective medical record review at six pediatric emergency departments (EDs) of otherwise healthy children 2 to 17 years of age discharged with acute asthma. Data were extracted on history, disease severity, and pharmacotherapy used in the ED and at discharge. The primary outcome was the proportion of children prescribed "comprehensive therapy," i.e., albuterol via metered dose inhaler (MDI) with oral and ICS.
The overall rate of comprehensive therapy was 382 of 654 (58%), which varied from 30% to 84% (p
PubMed ID
22978728 View in PubMed
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Two for one: a self-management plan coupled with a prescription sheet for children with asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154564
Source
Can Respir J. 2008 Oct;15(7):347-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Francine M Ducharme
Francisco Noya
David McGillivray
Sandy Resendes
Stéphanie Ducharme-Bénard
Roger Zemek
Sanjit Kaur Bhogal
Rachel Rouleau
Author Affiliation
Clinical Research on Chilhood Asthma,University of Montreal, Canada. francine.m.ducharme@umontreal.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2008 Oct;15(7):347-54
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy
Child
Drug Prescriptions - standards
Humans
Medication Therapy Management - organization & administration
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Quebec
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Self Care - methods
Abstract
Despite strong recommendations in the asthma guidelines, the use of written self-management plans remains low among asthmatic patients.
To develop a written self-management plan, based on scientific evidence and expert opinions, in a format intended to facilitate its dispensing by health care professionals, and to test the perception of its relevance and clarity by asthmatic children, adolescents and adults.
Inspired by previously tested self-management plans, surveys of asthma educators, expert opinions and the 2004 Canadian Asthma Guidelines, the authors simultaneously developed French and English versions of a written self-management plan that coupled with a prescription. The self-management plan was tested in parents and their asthmatic children (aged one to 17 years), and it was revised until 85% clarity and perceived relevance was achieved.
Ninety-seven children and their parents were interviewed. Twenty per cent had a self-management plan. On the final revision, nearly all items were clear and perceived relevant by 85% or more of the interviewees. Two self-management plans were designed for clinics and acute care settings, respectively. The plans are divided into three control zones identified by symptoms with optional peak flow values and symbolized by traffic light colours. They are designed in triplicate format with a prescription slip, a medical chart copy and a patient copy.
The written self-management plans, based on available scientific evidence and expert opinions, are clear and perceived to be relevant by children, adolescents and their parents. By incorporating the prescription and chart copies, they were designed to facilitate dispensing by physicians in both clinics and acute care settings.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18949103 View in PubMed
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