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Acceptability of human papillomavirus vaccination and sexual experience prior to disclosure to health care providers among men who have sex with men in Vancouver, Canada: implications for targeted vaccination programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122620
Source
Vaccine. 2012 Aug 24;30(39):5755-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-24-2012
Author
Claudia Rank
Mark Gilbert
Gina Ogilvie
Gayatri C Jayaraman
Rick Marchand
Terry Trussler
Robert S Hogg
Reka Gustafson
Tom Wong
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Vaccine. 2012 Aug 24;30(39):5755-60
Date
Aug-24-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Condylomata Acuminata - prevention & control
Disclosure
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Physician-Patient Relations
Vaccination - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Men who have sex with men (MSM) may benefit from human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine due to increased risk for HPV infection and related disease. We assessed HPV vaccine acceptability and sexual experience prior to disclosure to Health Care Providers (HCP) to understand implications of targeted vaccination strategies for MSM.
From July 2008 to February 2009, 1169 MSM aged =19 years were recruited at community venues in Vancouver. We assessed key variables from a self-administered questionnaire and independent predictors of HPV vaccine acceptability using multivariate logistic regression.
Of 1041 respondents, 697 (67.0%) were willing to receive HPV vaccine and 71.3% had heard of HPV. Significant multivariate predictors of higher vaccine acceptability were (adjusted odds ratio [95% CI]): previous diagnosis of genital warts (1.7 [1.1, 2.6]), disclosure of sexual behavior to HCP (1.6 [1.1, 2.3]), annual income at least $20,000 (1.5 [1.1, 2.1]), previous hepatitis A or B vaccination (1.4 [1.0, 2.0]), and no recent recreational drug use (1.4 [1.0, 2.0]). Most MSM (78.7%) had disclosed sexual behavior to HCP and median time from first sexual contact with males to disclosure was 6.0 years (IQR 2-14 years); for men =26 years these were 72.0% and 3.0 years (IQR 1-8 years) respectively.
Willingness to receive HPV vaccine was substantial among MSM in Vancouver; however, acceptability varied by demographics, risk, and health history. HPV vaccine programs delivered by HCP would offer limited benefit given the duration of time from sexual debut to disclosure to HCP.
PubMed ID
22796376 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence and plasma HIV RNA responses to highly active antiretroviral therapy among HIV-1 infected injection drug users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183497
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Sep 30;169(7):656-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-2003
Author
Evan Wood
Julio S G Montaner
Benita Yip
Mark W Tyndall
Martin T Schechter
Michael V O'Shaughnessy
Robert S Hogg
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC. ewood@hivnet.ubc.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Sep 30;169(7):656-61
Date
Sep-30-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active
British Columbia
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Female
HIV Infections - blood - drug therapy - etiology
HIV-1
Humans
Male
Patient compliance
RNA, Viral - blood - drug effects
Substance Abuse, Intravenous
Abstract
The benefits of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the treatment of HIV infection are well documented, but concerns regarding access and adherence to HAART are growing. We evaluated virological responses to HAART among HIV-1 infected patients who were injection drug users (IDUs) in a population-based setting where HIV/AIDS care is delivered free of charge.
We evaluated previously untreated HIV-1 infected men and women who initiated HAART between Aug. 1, 1996, and July 31, 2000, and who were followed until Mar. 31, 2002, in a province-wide HIV treatment program. We used Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression in our evaluation of time to suppression (i.e., less than 500 copies/mL) and rebound (i.e., 500 copies/mL or more) of plasma HIV-1 RNA, with patients stratified according to whether or not they had a history of injection drug use.
Overall, 1422 patients initiated HAART during the study period, of whom 359 (25.2%) were IDUs. In Kaplan-Meier analyses, the cumulative suppression rate at 12 months after initiation of HAART was 70.8% for non-IDUs and 51.4% for IDUs (p 0.1).
Non-IDUs and IDUs had similar rates of HIV-1 RNA suppression and rebound after the initiation of HAART, once lower levels of adherence were taken into account. Nevertheless, the lower virological response rates among IDUs suggest that, unless interventions are undertaken to improve adherence, these patients may experience elevated rates of disease progression and use of medical services in our setting.
Notes
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PubMed ID
14517122 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence and plasma HIV RNA response to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-seropositive injection drug users in a Canadian setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135422
Source
AIDS Care. 2011 Aug;23(8):980-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Seonaid Nolan
M-J Milloy
Ruth Zhang
Thomas Kerr
Robert S Hogg
Julio S G Montaner
Evan Wood
Author Affiliation
BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
AIDS Care. 2011 Aug;23(8):980-7
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-HIV Agents - therapeutic use
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Cohort Studies
Drug Users - psychology
Female
HIV Infections - blood - drug therapy - psychology
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Medication Adherence
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Proportional Hazards Models
RNA, Viral - blood - drug effects
Substance Abuse, Intravenous
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
HIV-positive individuals who use injection drugs (IDU) may have lower rates of adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, previous studies of factors associated with adherence to ART among IDU have been limited primarily to samples drawn from clinical settings and in areas with financial barriers to healthcare.We evaluated patterns of ART adherence and rates of plasma HIV RNA response among a Canadian cohort of community-recruited IDU. Using data from a community-recruited cohort of antiretroviral-naive HIV-infected IDU, we investigated ART adherence patterns based on prescription refill compliance and factors associated with time to plasma HIV-1 RNA suppression (
PubMed ID
21480010 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol use and incarceration adversely affect HIV-1 RNA suppression among injection drug users starting antiretroviral therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182124
Source
J Urban Health. 2003 Dec;80(4):667-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Anita Palepu
Mark W Tyndall
Kathy Li
Benita Yip
Michael V O'Shaughnessy
Martin T Schechter
Julio S G Montaner
Robert S Hogg
Author Affiliation
All the authors are with the University of British Columbia, British Columbia, Canada. anita@hivnet.ubc.ca
Source
J Urban Health. 2003 Dec;80(4):667-75
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active
British Columbia - epidemiology
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Female
HIV Infections - drug therapy - virology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Patient compliance
Prisons
RNA, Viral - blood
Statistics, nonparametric
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications
Abstract
We conducted this study among HIV-infected injection drug users to determine the effect of self-reported alcohol use and prior incarceration at the time of initiating antiretroviral therapy on subsequent HIV-1 RNA suppression. We examined the demographics, recent incarceration history, and drug and alcohol use history from the Vancouver Injection Drug User Study (VIDUS) questionnaire closest to the date of initiating antiretroviral therapy. We linked these data to the HIV/AIDS Drug Treatment Program. There were 234 VIDUS participants who accessed antiretroviral therapy through the Drug Treatment Program from August 1, 1996, to July 31, 2001. In terms of illicit drug use, 196 (84%) reported injecting heroin and cocaine at the time of initiating antiretroviral therapy. Multiple logistic regression revealed that in the 6 months prior to initiating antiretroviral therapy, alcohol use (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.32; 95% CI 0.13-0.81) and incarceration (AOR 0.22; 95% CI 0.09-0.58) were independently associated with lower odds of HIV-1 RNA suppression. Factors positively associated with HIV-1 RNA suppression included: adherence (AOR 1.27; 95% CI 1.06-1.51); lower baseline HIV-1 RNA (AOR 1.30; 95% CI 1.01-1.66); highly active antiretroviral therapy (AOR 4.10; 95% CI 1.56-10.6); months on therapy (AOR 1.1; 95% CI 1.06-1.14). Among HIV-infected injection drug users who were on antiretroviral therapy, any alcohol use and incarceration in the 6 months prior to initiating antiretroviral therapy were negatively associated with achieving HIV-1 RNA suppression. In addition to addiction treatment for active heroin and cocaine use, the identification and treatment of alcohol problems should be supported in this setting. As well, increased outreach to HIV-infected drug users recently released from prison to ensure continuity of care needs to be further developed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
14709714 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antiretroviral adherence and HIV treatment outcomes among HIV/HCV co-infected injection drug users: the role of methadone maintenance therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170216
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2006 Sep 15;84(2):188-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2006
Author
Anita Palepu
Mark W Tyndall
Ruth Joy
Thomas Kerr
Evan Wood
Natasha Press
Robert S Hogg
Julio S G Montaner
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Evaluation and Outcome Sciences, St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, BC, Canada. anita@hivnet.ubc.ca
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2006 Sep 15;84(2):188-94
Date
Sep-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Retroviral Agents - blood - therapeutic use
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Demography
Female
Follow-Up Studies
HIV Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology
Hepatitis C - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Methadone - therapeutic use
Narcotics - therapeutic use
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk-Taking
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Abstract
We examined the association of methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) adherence and HIV treatment outcomes among a cohort of HIV/HCV co-infected injection drug users (IDUs).
We obtained demographic, drug use, and addiction care history from the Vancouver Injection Drug User Study (VIDUS), which is an open cohort study of IDUs. The questionnaires were longitudinally linked to the British Columbia HIV/AIDS Drug Treatment Program to obtain HAART adherence and HIV treatment outcome data. There were 278 VIDUS participants who accessed HAART from August 1, 1996 to November 24, 2003. We constructed longitudinal logistic models using generalized estimating equations to examine the independent associations between methadone maintenance therapy and the following outcomes: HAART adherence; plasma HIV-1 RNA suppression; and CD4 cell rise of 100cells/mm(3).
Among participants who reported at least weekly heroin use, MMT was independently associated with lower odds of subsequent weekly heroin use during the follow-up period (adjusted odds ratio; 95% confidence interval [AOR; 95% CI]: 0.24; 0.14-0.40). We also found that MMT was positively associated with adherence (AOR 1.52; 95% CI 1.16-2.00), HIV-1 RNA suppression (AOR 1.34; 95% CI 1.00-1.79), and CD4 cell count rise (AOR 1.58; 95% CI 1.26-1.99).
Among HIV/HCV co-infected IDUs on HAART, enrollment in MMT was associated with reduced heroin use, and improved adherence, HIV-1 RNA suppression and CD4 cell count response. Integrating opiate addiction care and HIV care may provide improved health outcomes for this vulnerable population and should be further explored.
PubMed ID
16542797 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antiretroviral drug costs and prescription patterns in British Columbia, Canada: 1996-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104295
Source
Med Care. 2014 Apr;52(4):362-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Bohdan Nosyk
Julio S G Montaner
Benita Yip
Viviane D Lima
Robert S Hogg
Author Affiliation
*BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS †Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University ‡Division of AIDS, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Med Care. 2014 Apr;52(4):362-9
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-HIV Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active - economics - utilization
British Columbia - epidemiology
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Drug Costs - statistics & numerical data
Female
HIV Infections - drug therapy - economics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Treatment options and therapeutic guidelines have evolved substantially since highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) became the standard of HIV care in 1996. We conducted the present population-based analysis to characterize the determinants of direct costs of HAART over time in British Columbia, Canada.
We considered individuals ever receiving HAART in British Columbia from 1996 to 2011. Linear mixed-effects regression models were constructed to determine the effects of demographic indicators, clinical stage, and treatment characteristics on quarterly costs of HAART (in 2010$CDN) among individuals initiating in different temporal periods. The least-square mean values were estimated by CD4 category and over time for each temporal cohort.
Longitudinal data on HAART recipients (N = 9601, 17.6% female, mean age at initiation = 40.5) were analyzed. Multiple regression analyses identified demographics, treatment adherence, and pharmacological class to be independently associated with quarterly HAART costs. Higher CD4 cell counts were associated with modestly lower costs among pre-HAART initiators [least-square means (95% confidence interval), CD4 >?500: 4674 (4632-4716); CD4: 350-499: 4765 (4721-4809) CD4: 200-349: 4826 (4780-4871); CD4
PubMed ID
24848208 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antiretroviral resistance among HIV-infected persons who have died in British Columbia, in the era of modern antiretroviral therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179504
Source
J Infect Dis. 2004 Jul 15;190(2):285-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2004
Author
Magdalena A Recsky
Zabrina L Brumme
Keith J Chan
Brian Wynhoven
Benita Yip
Winnie W Y Dong
Katherine V Heath
Julio S G Montaner
Adrian R Levy
Robert S Hogg
P Richard Harrigan
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Infect Dis. 2004 Jul 15;190(2):285-92
Date
Jul-15-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amino Acid Substitution
Anti-HIV Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active
British Columbia
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Viral - genetics
Drug Resistance, Viral - genetics
Female
Genotype
HIV - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purification
HIV Infections - drug therapy - mortality - virology
HIV Protease - genetics
HIV Protease Inhibitors - pharmacology - therapeutic use
HIV Reverse Transcriptase - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Prevalence
Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Viral Load
Abstract
The prevalence of antiretroviral resistance among persons enrolled in the centralized HIV/AIDS Drug Treatment Program in British Columbia, Canada, who had died between July 1997 and December 2001, was investigated, to determine the degree to which antiretroviral resistance contributed to mortality.
During this period, 637 deaths had occurred. The last plasma sample obtained during therapy was genotyped retrospectively for treated individuals who had died of a nonaccidental cause. Samples with plasma human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) loads /=1, >/=2, or 3 drug classes was observed in 76%, 42%, and 11% of individuals, respectively, in the group of 1220 living individuals experiencing virologic therapy failure, compared with only 44%, 23%, and 5% of individuals, respectively, who had died (P
PubMed ID
15216463 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antiretroviral treatment patterns and incident HIV-associated morphologic and lipid abnormalities in a population-based chort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189265
Source
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2002 Aug 1;30(4):440-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2002
Author
Katherine V Heath
Robert S Hogg
Joel Singer
Keith J Chan
Michael V O'Shaughnessy
Julio S G Montaner
Author Affiliation
Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, Departments of Health Care and Epidemiology, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, and Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia; and Canadian HIV Trials Network, Canada. kheath@hivnet.ubc.ca
Source
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2002 Aug 1;30(4):440-7
Date
Aug-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-HIV Agents - adverse effects
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active - adverse effects
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cholesterol - blood
Cohort Studies
Female
HIV Infections - blood - complications - drug therapy
HIV Protease Inhibitors - adverse effects
Humans
Lipodystrophy - blood - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors - adverse effects
Syndrome
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
This study provides population-based estimates of the incidence of constituent symptoms associated with HIV-related lipodystrophy syndrome. Possible predictors of symptomatology based on analysis of accrued cases are provided after adjustment for a broad range of personal, clinical, and treatment characteristics. Patients enrolled in a province-wide HIV/AIDS treatment program reported annually on the occurrence of lipoatrophy, lipohypertrophy, and elevated triglyceride and cholesterol levels. Of 1261 individuals who provided baseline data, 745 were available at follow-up, among whom incidence was 27% for lipoatrophy, 21% for lipohypertrophy, and 10% and 16% for increased triglyceride and cholesterol levels, respectively. In logistic multivariate modeling, incident lipoatrophy was associated with duration of stavudine (per quarter) (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-1.27) and having been diagnosed with AIDS (AOR 2.07; 95% CI 1.20-3.56). Lipohypertrophy risk increased with use of protease inhibitor (AOR 3.53; 95% CI 1.81-6.86) and stavudine (AOR 3.67; 95% CI 1.61-8.38). Incident cholesterol or triglyceride abnormalities were associated with protease inhibitor use (AOR 7.17; 95% CI 2.46-20.96) and duration of ritonavir (per quarter) (AOR 1.12; 95% CI 1.04-1.21). Our findings suggest high annual rates of incidence and a role of first line antiretroviral therapies in symptom development. These outcomes, in conjunction with the findings of others have important implications for evolving treatment patterns.
PubMed ID
12138351 View in PubMed
Less detail

Application and validation of case-finding algorithms for identifying individuals with human immunodeficiency virus from administrative data in British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116574
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e54416
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Bohdan Nosyk
Guillaume Colley
Benita Yip
Keith Chan
Katherine Heath
Viviane D Lima
Mark Gilbert
Robert S Hogg
P Richard Harrigan
Julio S G Montaner
Author Affiliation
BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e54416
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Contact Tracing
Databases, Factual
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Registries
Sentinel Surveillance
Abstract
To define a population-level cohort of individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the province of British Columbia from available registries and administrative datasets using a validated case-finding algorithm.
Individuals were identified for possible cohort inclusion from the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (CfE) drug treatment program (antiretroviral therapy) and laboratory testing datasets (plasma viral load (pVL) and CD4 diagnostic test results), the BC Centre for Disease Control (CDC) provincial HIV surveillance database (positive HIV tests), as well as databases held by the BC Ministry of Health (MoH); the Discharge Abstract Database (hospitalizations), the Medical Services Plan (physician billing) and PharmaNet databases (additional HIV-related medications). A validated case-finding algorithm was applied to distinguish true HIV cases from those likely to have been misclassified. The sensitivity of the algorithms was assessed as the proportion of confirmed cases (those with records in the CfE, CDC and MoH databases) positively identified by each algorithm. A priori hypotheses were generated and tested to verify excluded cases.
A total of 25,673 individuals were identified as having at least one HIV-related health record. Among 9,454 unconfirmed cases, the selected case-finding algorithm identified 849 individuals believed to be HIV-positive. The sensitivity of this algorithm among confirmed cases was 88%. Those excluded from the cohort were more likely to be female (44.4% vs. 22.5%; p
Notes
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PubMed ID
23382898 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing the impact of an adult day program on hospital utilization by persons living with HIV/AIDS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188388
Source
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2002 Sep 1;31(1):117-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2002

119 records – page 1 of 12.