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[Characteristics of adolescent offenders receiving services in juvenile centers in Québec (Centres jeunesse du Québec, CJQ)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144521
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2009;34(2):123-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Jean Toupin
Robert Pauzé
Nadine Lanctôt
Author Affiliation
Département de Psychoéducation de l'Université de Sherbrooke, Montréal-Institut Universitaire, Canada.
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2009;34(2):123-45
Date
2009
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Child
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - legislation & jurisprudence
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Prisoners - psychology
Quebec
Social Behavior
Abstract
This study aims at establishing a comparative psychological profile of male and female adolescents at the moment of the application of measures in juvenile centers in Québec (centres jeunesse du Québec, CJQ) as well as their family and social characteristics. The study compares 213 adolescents (12-17 years old) receiving services in CJQ in accordance with the juvenile offenders act (Loi sur les jeunes contrevenants), with 213 adolescents from high schools of impoverished neighbourhoods. Results reveal serious problems of adaptation, external disorders and interiorized disorders and a regular substance abuse among many juvenile offenders. These problems are much more frequent in CJQ than within the juvenile population. The situation of these adolescents is worrisome, given that a high prevalence of depression and sexual victimisation is also observed in females. Finally, families whose adolescent receives services in CJQ have less financial, personal and social resources, as well as more difficulty exercising their parental role compared to parents in the general population. In conclusion, recommendations are proposed concerning psychosocial services necessary for these adolescents and their families.
PubMed ID
20361112 View in PubMed
Less detail

Externalizing problems and problematic sexual behaviors: same etiology?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141489
Source
Aggress Behav. 2010 Nov-Dec;36(6):358-70
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mireille Lévesque
Marc Bigras
Robert Pauzé
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, Succursale Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec, Canada. mirelevesque@gmail.com
Source
Aggress Behav. 2010 Nov-Dec;36(6):358-70
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aggression - psychology
Child
Child Abuse - psychology
Child Behavior Disorders - etiology - psychology
Child Welfare
Family
Female
Humans
Male
Quebec
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Social Environment
Abstract
The study sought to determine whether maltreatment subtypes, family sexuality, and personal characteristics predicted and distinguished child problematic sexual behaviors (PSB) and externalizing problems (EP). Participants were families of 188 children, 6-11 years old, referred by child welfare services in four Quebec districts. Caregivers completed interviews and questionnaires. Results suggested that family environment and maltreatment subtypes had partially different impacts on PSB and EP. When EP and gender were controlled, younger children in a sexualized family environment and those verbally victimized were more likely to exhibit PSB. When PSB and gender were controlled, verbal abuse and neglect emerged as predictors of EP. Potential implications for child PSB research and interventions are discussed.
PubMed ID
20718000 View in PubMed
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Factors associated with homelessness of adolescents under supervision of the youth protection system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174920
Source
J Adolesc. 2005 Apr;28(2):215-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Marie Robert
Robert Pauzé
Louise Fournier
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychoéducation and Psychology, Université du Québec en Outaouais, C.P. 1250, Succ. Hull, Canada J8x 3X7. marie.robert@uqo.ca
Source
J Adolesc. 2005 Apr;28(2):215-30
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Causality
Child
Child Welfare
Family Characteristics
Female
Homeless Youth
Humans
Male
Quebec
Social Support
Abstract
There are two factors that limit our knowledge of the risk factors associated with homelessness among runaway adolescents, namely (1) the samples used are often composed of youth homeless service users and/or youths living on the streets (visible homelessness), whereas most adolescents in fact use "private" resources (hidden homelessness), and (2) failure to use an adequate control group to identify risk factors associated specifically with homelessness. Our study compares the characteristics of two groups of youths under the supervision of the youth protection system, according to the presence or absence of periods of homelessness. The results throw light on the factors underlying the shift from "at risk" to "homeless", showing that youths with experience of homelessness are more likely to have been placed in substitute home environments, have experienced significant relationship difficulties with one of their parents (deterioration of the parent/youth relationship and parental abuse) and to have been diagnosed with behavioural disorders. The findings suggest that the decision to place young people under supervision is based more on the dynamic between risk factors rather than on the existence of behavioural problems.
PubMed ID
15878044 View in PubMed
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The impact of serial transitions on behavioral and psychological problems among children in child protection services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165112
Source
Child Welfare. 2006 Nov-Dec;85(6):941-64
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marie-Christine Saint-Jacques
Richard Cloutier
Robert Pauzé
Marie Simard
Marie-Hélène Gagné
Amélie Poulin
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, Laval University, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Child Welfare. 2006 Nov-Dec;85(6):941-64
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Child Abuse - psychology
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Child, Preschool
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Family Characteristics
Humans
Mental Disorders - psychology
Multivariate Analysis
Parent-Child Relations
Quebec - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Abstract
This study focuses on the impacts of serial transitions on externalized and internalized behavior disorders, anxiety, and depression among children in child protection services. The research was carried out with a sample of 741 children. The findings demonstrate that the number of times a family is blended is a stronger predictive factor for children's adjustment than is the family structure at the time of the interview. In predicting externalized and internalized behavior problems among children, however, the effect of family structure disappears in favor of the variables associated with family functioning and family climate.
PubMed ID
17305043 View in PubMed
Less detail

Persistence of problematic sexual behaviors in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126177
Source
J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol. 2012;41(2):239-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Mireille Lévesque
Marc Bigras
Robert Pauzé
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada. mirelevesque@gmail.com
Source
J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol. 2012;41(2):239-45
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caregivers
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Child Behavior Disorders - psychology
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Quebec
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to identify personal and family predictors and correlates of persistence of problematic sexual behaviors (PSB) in children. Participants were the families of 49 children (ages 4-11 years) referred by Child Protective Services in 4 administrative districts of Quebec. Caregivers completed interviews and questionnaires twice at a 1-year interval. Results showed that 43% of children persisted with PSB. When age was controlled, greater exposure to sexualized behaviors in the family proved both a correlate and a predictor of PSB persistence in children 12 months later. Externalizing problems and somatic complaints emerged as correlates of PSB as well. Maltreatment subtypes did not predict PSB persistence.
PubMed ID
22417196 View in PubMed
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The role of depression and dissociation in the link between childhood sexual abuse and later parental practices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172965
Source
J Trauma Dissociation. 2005;6(1):71-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Delphine Collin-Vézina
Mireille Cyr
Robert Pauzé
Pierre McDuff
Author Affiliation
Université de Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Trauma Dissociation. 2005;6(1):71-97
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Causality
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child Rearing - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Dissociative Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Domestic Violence - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Quebec - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Reinforcement (Psychology)
Abstract
Research has yielded contradictory results on the relationship between childhood sexual abuse and later parental functioning. This study was undertaken to specify the link between childhood sexual abuse and maternal parenting, while taking into account mothers' childhood physical and emotional traumas and current depressive and dissociative symptoms. Data were collected through self-report measures completed by 93 French-speaking Canadian mothers of children aged 6 to 11 years referred to Youth Protection Services. Parental behaviors examined included involvement with the child, use of positive reinforcement, lack of monitoring and supervision of the child, inconsistency in applying discipline, and use of corporal punishment. Mothers' perception of the quality of the relationship with her child was also assessed. In addition, history of abuse and neglect, depression and dissociation were respectively measured with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, the Diagnostic Interview Schedule Simplified, and the Dissociative Experiences Scale. The short-form of the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale was used to control for respondent bias aimed at minimizing their problems. Mothers' current depressive symptoms were not found to predict any of the parental dimensions measured. Results from multiple hierarchical regressions pointed to dissociative symptoms as the key predictor of parental practices and attitudes. More specifically, dissociative symptoms predicted the use of positive reinforcement, lack of monitoring and supervision of the child, inconsistency in applying discipline, and use of corporal punishment. Dissociation also mediated the association between childhood maltreatment (physical and emotional abuse and neglect) and inconsistency in applying discipline. Implications for research and practice are discussed.
PubMed ID
16150686 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Symptomatology and psychosocial adaptation in adolescents with depressive disorder and comorbid disruptive behaviour disorder].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158706
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2008 Jan;53(1):43-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Jean Toupin
Yann Le Corff
Robert Pauzé
Author Affiliation
Département de psychoéducation, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec. Jean.Toupin@USherbrooke.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2008 Jan;53(1):43-51
Date
Jan-2008
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adult
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - statistics & numerical data
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Questionnaires
Self Disclosure
Social Behavior
Abstract
To describe symptomatology and specific psychological, social, and academic adaptation in adolescents with depressive disorder and comorbid disruptive behaviour disorder, as well as their family situation.
Using binomial logistic regressions, this study compares adolescents with depressive disorder and comorbid disruptive behaviour disorder (n=25) with adolescents with the same behaviour problems but no comorbid depressive disorder (n=99). Sex-specific interaction impacts are examined.
While both groups have several similar characteristics, youth with a dual diagnosis have more oppositional symptoms and poorer self-esteem. Analyses show no interaction impact from sex variable.
Adolescents in both groups would benefit from similar interventions regarding disruptive behaviour disorders and some related problems, such as using psychoactive drugs, socializing with delinquent peers, and difficulty functioning in school. Adolescents with a comorbid depressive disorder need special attention, given the more significant oppositional symptomatology and the poorer self-esteem.
PubMed ID
18286871 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Victimization and problems of behavior. Two components of profile types of runaway adolescents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181256
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2004 Feb;28(2):193-208
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Marie Robert
Louise Fournier
Robert Pauzé
Author Affiliation
Ecole de Service Social, Université de Montréal, Centreville, Montreal, Que., Canada.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2004 Feb;28(2):193-208
Date
Feb-2004
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Psychology
Child
Crime Victims
Discriminant Analysis
Female
Homeless Youth - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Parent-Child Relations
Quebec
Runaway Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Violence
Abstract
This study examines the relationship between two explanatory factors connected to the phenomena of runaways and the homeless among adolescents: behavioral problems of youths and parental violence to which they are subjected. The study demonstrates that these two factors are independently related to the different categories of homeless and runaway adolescents.
The data was collected from 130 adolescents (12 to 17 years of age) who were runaways for short periods on a recurring basis. Two subgroups were formed: Group A consisted of 79 adolescents who did not exhibit behavioral problems; Group B consisted of the other 51 who did exhibit them. The two groups had certain similar family characteristics (income levels, parents' occupations, structure and stability of the family).
The bivariate analyses reveal significant differences between the two groups of runaways relating to: (1) gender, (2) a diagnosed conduct disorder, (3) affiliations with deviant peers, and (4) experiences of parental violence. The discriminant analysis demonstrates that these four variables clearly differentiate the two groups of runaways and predict the appropriate group membership for 84% of the cases. Therefore, the members of Group B have a higher probability of being diagnosed as having a conduct disorder, being male, and associating with delinquent peers. This group had not experienced a higher level of parental violence. The opposite is true for the members of Group A.
Our study demonstrates that parental violence and behavioral problems are variables that are independently related to the defined categories of runaways. Therefore, these variables do not constitute, as some thinkers have claimed, the components of a unique dynamic able to explain the phenomenon of the runaway. Our results vitiate the doubts sometimes expressed by researchers about the importance of parental violence to the phenomenon of adolescent runaways.
PubMed ID
15003402 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.