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Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 2003 Jul;42(1 Suppl):42-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Rita Suri
Thomas A Depner
Peter G Blake
A Paul Heidenheim
Robert M Lindsay
Author Affiliation
Optimal Dialysis Research Unit, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 2003 Jul;42(1 Suppl):42-8
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Appointments and Schedules
Blood Urea Nitrogen
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hemodialysis, Home - methods
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - blood - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Ontario - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Urea - blood
Abstract
Several methods exist to quantitate small-solute clearance by daily hemodialysis (HD) regimens, but these have not been empirically applied or compared.
In the London Daily/Nocturnal Hemodialysis Study, dosing and adequacy of quotidian HD regimens, both short daily HD (n = 11) and long nocturnal HD (n = 12), were compared with conventional thrice-weekly HD (n = 22) using several models. Urea clearance was computed by percentage of reduction in urea, kinetic modeling (single-pool Kt/V [spKt/V]), Daugirdas rate equation (equilibrated Kt/V [eKt/V]), and Gotch standardized Kt/V (stdKt/V).
Nocturnal HD patients maintained a mean single-session spKt/V of 1.64 throughout the study, similar to that of conventional HD patients (1.73), whereas daily HD patients showed a significant decrease in mean single-session spKt/V (0.93) compared with baseline (t(0)) values. Mean weekly spKt/V values increased from t(0) for both quotidian HD groups (9.08 for nocturnal HD, 5.55 for daily HD) and were higher in both quotidian HD groups compared with conventional HD patients. Weekly eKt/V, stdKt/V, and normalized protein equivalent of nitrogen appearance values showed similar trends. Comparison of the 3 different adequacy models showed an increase in weekly HD doses for both quotidian HD regimens compared with conventional HD; however, percentages of increases from t(0) to follow-up differed according to the model used. The calculated efficiency of dose delivery at the 10-month follow-up comparing daily HD with conventional HD was 257 +/- 26 minutes versus 306 +/- 17 stdKt/V unit delivered, respectively, amounting to almost 1 dialysis-hour saved per stdKt/V unit delivered for daily HD.
These results show that both quotidian HD regimens are more effective than conventional HD in improving weekly urea clearance measured by spKt/V, stdKt/V, and eKt/V.
PubMed ID
12830443 View in PubMed
Less detail

The impact of quotidian hemodialysis on nutrition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184750
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 2003 Jul;42(1 Suppl):30-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Evelyn Spanner
Rita Suri
A Paul Heidenheim
Robert M Lindsay
Author Affiliation
Optimal Dialysis Research Unit, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 2003 Jul;42(1 Suppl):30-5
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Appointments and Schedules
Biological Markers
Body Weight
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hemodialysis, Home - adverse effects - methods
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - complications - therapy
Male
Malnutrition - blood - etiology - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Nitrogen - blood
Ontario - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Serum Albumin - analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Malnutrition is a common problem in hemodialysis (HD) patients and one of the most important factors influencing morbidity and mortality. More frequent HD has been shown to improve nutritional status in HD patients.
The London Daily/Nocturnal Hemodialysis Study compared the nutritional status of patients receiving quotidian HD, either short daily HD (n = 11) or long nocturnal HD (n = 12), with that of 22 matched control patients receiving conventional thrice-weekly HD. A number of biochemical parameters indicative of nutritional status were measured, including protein equivalent of total nitrogen appearance (nPNA), serum albumin, serum prealbumin, dietary calcium, serum lipids, and water-soluble vitamin levels.
nPNA tended to increase throughout the study for both quotidian HD groups and remained unchanged in the control group, which had the lowest values (1 to 1.1 g/kg/d). Daily HD patients showed a significant increase in mean serum albumin levels at 3, 12, and 18 months. The nocturnal HD group showed a significant decrease in albumin levels at month 9, and control patients maintained relatively stable albumin levels throughout the study. Serum prealbumin levels averaged 0.04 g/dL for daily HD patients, whereas serum prealbumin levels decreased in nocturnal HD patients during the study period. Half the nocturnal HD patients had vitamin C levels lower than the reference range. Body composition data showed increased arm muscle area and maintenance of 100% to 110% of relative body weight (RBW) after several months of daily HD, whereas patients on nocturnal HD therapy showed a significant decline in RBW. There were no significant differences in lean body mass, percentage of body fat, or body mass index among the 3 study groups.
Increased nPNA, serum albumin levels, and arm muscle area suggest that daily HD patients experienced improved nutritional status.
PubMed ID
12830441 View in PubMed
Less detail

Long term risk for hypertension, renal impairment, and cardiovascular disease after gastroenteritis from drinking water contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139240
Source
BMJ. 2010;341:c6020
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
William F Clark
Jessica M Sontrop
Jennifer J Macnab
Marina Salvadori
Louise Moist
Rita Suri
Amit X Garg
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON, Canada. William.Clark@lhsc.on.ca
Source
BMJ. 2010;341:c6020
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology
Escherichia coli O157
Female
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - microbiology
Incidence
Kidney Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Water Microbiology
Water Supply - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To evaluate the risk for hypertension, renal impairment, and cardiovascular disease within eight years of gastroenteritis from drinking water contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Campylobacter.
A prospective cohort study. Setting Walkerton, Ontario, Canada.
1977 adult participants in the Walkerton Health Study recruited between 2002 and 2005 after an outbreak of gastroenteritis in May 2000, when a municipal water system was contaminated, with no pre-outbreak history of outcome measures.
Information was collected annually via survey, physical examination, and laboratory assessment. Primary measures were acute gastroenteritis (diarrhoeal illness lasting >3 days, bloody diarrhoea, or >3 loose stools/day), hypertension (blood pressure =140/90 mm Hg), and renal impairment (microalbuminuria or estimated glomerular filtration rate
Notes
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Comment In: Nat Rev Nephrol. 2011 Feb;7(2):6421355123
PubMed ID
21084368 View in PubMed
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Volume control and blood pressure management in patients undergoing quotidian hemodialysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184753
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 2003 Jul;42(1 Suppl):13-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Gihad Nesrallah
Rita Suri
Louise Moist
Claude Kortas
Robert M Lindsay
Author Affiliation
Optimal Dialysis Research Unit, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 2003 Jul;42(1 Suppl):13-7
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Appointments and Schedules
Blood pressure
Extracellular Fluid
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hemodialysis, Home - methods
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - therapy
Kidney Failure, Chronic - complications - physiopathology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Weight Gain
Abstract
Hypertension and interdialytic weight gain are associated with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), an important predictor of cardiovascular mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients.
In the London Daily/Nocturnal Hemodialysis Study, a group of patients receiving quotidian HD, either short daily (n = 11) or long nocturnal (n = 12), were followed for up to 18 months. Patients were assessed for effects of quotidian HD therapy on blood pressure, interdialytic weight gain, extracellular fluid volume (ECFV), intensity of antihypertensive therapy, and homocysteine levels.
Significant reductions in predialysis mean arterial blood pressure were observed in the daily HD group at 6 months (P
PubMed ID
12830438 View in PubMed
Less detail