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Adverse outcome and resistance to adjuvant antiestrogen therapy in node-positive postmenopausal breast cancer patients-The role of p53.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16901
Source
Breast. 2006 Feb;15(1):69-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Eeva Rahko
Guillermo Blanco
Risto Bloigu
Ylermi Soini
Anne Talvensaari-Mattila
Arja Jukkola
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Oulu University Hospital, PL 22, FIN-90229 Oulu, Finland. eeva.rank@ppshp.fi
Source
Breast. 2006 Feb;15(1):69-75
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The prognostic and predictive relevance of p53 immunoreactivity is used here as a tentative approach for defining more accurately the benefit of adjuvant hormonal therapy in postmenopausal node-positive breast cancer patients. Ninety-seven postmenopausal patients with axillary lymph node metastasis were treated with an antiestrogen for a period of 3 years after primary surgery and radiotherapy. The p53 status of the primary tumor was assessed by immunohistochemistry and 24% of the samples showed positive expression of p53. Within the average follow-up time of 59 months, disease recurrence was diagnosed in 34 patients (35%). Multivariate analysis showed high clinical stage, negative estrogen receptor status and p53 positivity to be independent prognostic factors predicting both shortened disease-free survival and worse overall survival. p53 immunoreactivity was associated with worse clinical outcome irrespective of hormone receptor status. The data suggest that adjuvant therapy with antiestrogens is insufficient in this patient population with p53-positive tumors.
PubMed ID
16005229 View in PubMed
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Audiogram configurations among older adults: prevalence and relation to self-reported hearing problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131301
Source
Int J Audiol. 2011 Nov;50(11):793-801
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Samuli Hannula
Risto Bloigu
Kari Majamaa
Martti Sorri
Elina Mäki-Torkko
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Medicine, Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Audiol. 2011 Nov;50(11):793-801
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation
Age Factors
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Auditory Pathways - physiopathology
Auditory Threshold
Bone Conduction
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Registries
Self Report
Sex Factors
Abstract
There are only a few population-based epidemiological studies on audiogram configurations among adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of different audiogram configurations among older adults. In addition, audiogram configurations among subjects reporting hearing problems were examined.
Cross-sectional, population-based, unscreened epidemiological study among older adults.
The subjects (n = 850), aged 54-66 years, were randomly sampled from the population register. A questionnaire survey, an otological examination, and pure-tone audiometry were performed.
The most prevalent audiogram configuration among men was high-frequency steeply sloping (65.3% left ear, 51.2% right ear) and among women, high-frequency gently sloping (33.0% left ear, 31.5% right ear). There were significantly more flat configurations among women than among men. Unclassified audiograms were common especially among women (17.5%). Subjects reporting hearing difficulties, difficulties in following conversation in noise, or tinnitus, more often had a high-frequency steeply sloping configuration than those not reporting.
High-frequency sloping audiogram configurations were common among older adults, and a high-frequency steeply sloping configuration was common among those reporting hearing problems.
PubMed ID
21916791 View in PubMed
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Autism spectrum disorders according to DSM-IV-TR and comparison with DSM-5 draft criteria: an epidemiological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134110
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2011 Jun;50(6):583-592.e11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Marja-Leena Mattila
Marko Kielinen
Sirkka-Liisa Linna
Katja Jussila
Hanna Ebeling
Risto Bloigu
Robert M Joseph
Irma Moilanen
Author Affiliation
Clinic of Child Psychiatry, University and University Hospital of Oulu, Finland. marja-leena.mattila@fimnet.fi
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2011 Jun;50(6):583-592.e11
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asperger Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Autistic Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Finland
Humans
Intelligence
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mass Screening
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Translating
Abstract
The latest definitions of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) were specified in DSM-IV-TR in 2000. DSM-5 criteria are planned for 2013. Here, we estimated the prevalence of ASDs and autism according to DSM-IV-TR, clarified confusion concerning diagnostic criteria, and evaluated DSM-5 draft criteria for ASD posted by the American Psychiatry Association (APA) in February 2010.
This was an epidemiological study of 5,484 eight-year-old children in Finland, 4,422 (81%) of them rated via the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire by parents and/or teachers, and 110 examined by using a structured interview, semi-structured observation, IQ measurement, school-day observation, and patient records. Diagnoses were assigned according to DSM-IV-TR criteria and DSM-5 draft criteria in children with a full-scale IQ (FSIQ) =50. Patient records were evaluated in children with an FSIQ
Notes
Comment In: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2011 Jun;50(6):540-221621137
PubMed ID
21621142 View in PubMed
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Biological roles and prognostic values of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition-mediating transcription factors Twist, ZEB1 and Slug in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118594
Source
Histopathology. 2013 Jan;62(2):326-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Siria Lemma
Peeter Karihtala
Kirsi-Maria Haapasaari
Esa Jantunen
Ylermi Soini
Risto Bloigu
Anna-Kaisa Pasanen
Taina Turpeenniemi-Hujanen
Outi Kuittinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. slemma@mail.student.oulu.fi
Source
Histopathology. 2013 Jan;62(2):326-33
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Cell Nucleus - metabolism - pathology
Cyclophosphamide - therapeutic use
Doxorubicin - therapeutic use
Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition
Finland - epidemiology
Homeodomain Proteins - metabolism
Humans
Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse - diagnosis - drug therapy - metabolism - mortality
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Nuclear Proteins - metabolism
Prednisone - therapeutic use
Prognosis
Survival Rate
Transcription Factors - metabolism
Tumor Markers, Biological - metabolism
Twist Transcription Factor - metabolism
Vincristine - therapeutic use
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate the biological roles and prognostic significance of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-mediating transcription factors (TFs) Twist, ZEB1 and Slug in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). EMT has been shown to enhance solid tumour metastasis, invasion, and proliferation.
Expression of Twist, ZEB1 and Slug was evaluated immunohistochemically in eight samples from reactive lymphoid tissues and in diagnostic samples from 102 DLBCL patients treated with curative intent with R-CHOP-type chemotherapy. ZEB1 and Slug expression correlated with adverse disease presentation. However, cytoplasmic Slug expression was linked to a favourable disease outcome, whereas nuclear expression of ZEB1 indicated an adverse outcome.
This study shows that an EMT-like process occurs in lymphomas. Of the TFs investigated, ZEB1 seems to be the main one associated with adverse clinical presentation and clinical outcome. Surprisingly, Slug expression in cytoplasm was linked to a favourable prognosis. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether inhibition of ZEB1 could serve as a therapeutic target.
PubMed ID
23190132 View in PubMed
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Bronchoalveolar cell differential count and the number of asbestos bodies correlate with survival in patients with asbestosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310242
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2019 10; 76(10):765-771
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-2019
Author
Eerika Keskitalo
Laura Varis
Risto Bloigu
Riitta Kaarteenaho
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2019 10; 76(10):765-771
Date
10-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Asbestos - analysis
Asbestosis - pathology
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology
Cell Count
Female
Finland
Humans
Lymphocytes - pathology
Macrophages - pathology
Male
Neutrophils - pathology
Smoking - adverse effects
Survival Analysis
Abstract
To determine cell differential counts and the number of asbestos bodies (ABs) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid obtained from patients with asbestosis, and to correlate the results with their survival.
The BAL cell differential counts and ABs from 91 patients with asbestosis were determined. The BAL cell differential counts were analysed in relation to smoking status. BAL cell differential counts and the number of ABs were correlated with the patients' survivals.
A neutrophilic cell pattern was observed independently of smoking habits with both Papanicolau (8.4%) and May-Grunwald-Giemsa (6.5%) staining. Smoking and a high number of ABs (>2?AB/mL) were associated with high total cell counts and high macrophage and low lymphocyte differential counts. The median survival of the patients was 131.8 months. Shortened survival was associated with high numbers of ABs (78 vs 165 months; p=0.042) and low lymphocyte (77 vs 179 months; p=0.005), high neutrophil (102 vs 180 months; p=0.016) and high eosinophil (104 vs170 months; p=0.007) differential counts.
A neutrophilic cell pattern was evident in BAL from patients with asbestosis. Smoking and ABs both affected the total cell count and the macrophage and lymphocyte differential counts. Several BAL parameters associated with patient survival, suggesting that BAL cell count analyses could be used in the estimation of the prognosis of patients with asbestosis.
Notes
CommentIn: Occup Environ Med. 2020 May;77(5):351 PMID 32123032
CommentIn: Occup Environ Med. 2020 May;77(5):352 PMID 32123033
PubMed ID
31331950 View in PubMed
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Childhood hearing impairment in northern Finland, etiology and additional disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268965
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2014 Nov;78(11):1852-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Sanna Häkli
Mirja Luotonen
Risto Bloigu
Kari Majamaa
Martti Sorri
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2014 Nov;78(11):1852-6
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cohort Studies
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing Loss - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Motor Disorders - epidemiology
Neurodevelopmental Disorders - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Vision Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and etiology of hearing impairment (HI) in Finnish children and to evaluate the frequency and type of additional disabilities among children with HI.
Subjects consisted of 214 children with mild to profound HI ascertained until the age of 10 years. They belonged to the birth cohort spanning the years 1993-2002 in northern Finland. The clinical data were collected from the electronic patient records of the Oulu University Hospital. Age at ascertainment, degree and type of HI and audiogram configuration were determined. Risk factors and etiology of HI and co-existing disabilities were recorded.
The prevalence of childhood HI was 2.3/1000 live births (95% CI; 2.0, 2.7). The etiology of HI was genetic in 47.2%, acquired in 16.4% and unknown in 36.4% children. Among the 214 children with HI, 101 (47.2%) had other minor or major disabilities. The frequency of additional disabilities did not differ between children with mild HI and those with moderate or severe HI (p=0.78). Additional disabilities were more common (65.7%) in children with acquired HI than in children with genetic or unknown HI (43.6%) (p=0.035).
The prevalence of childhood HI has remained unchanged in northern Finland as compared to previous studies. Genetic causes were the most common (47%) etiology of childhood HI. Among acquired causes of HI, perinatal risk factors were more common than previously. The frequency of additional disabilities was similar among children with different degrees of HI. Because almost 40% of children had one or more additional disabilities affecting development or learning, it is important to take them into consideration in rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
25193587 View in PubMed
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Citalopram and fluoxetine in the treatment of postmenopausal symptoms: a prospective, randomized, 9-month, placebo-controlled, double-blind study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45733
Source
Menopause. 2005 Jan-Feb;12(1):18-26
Publication Type
Article
Author
Eila Suvanto-Luukkonen
Riitta Koivunen
Helena Sundström
Risto Bloigu
Eija Karjalainen
Leena Häivä-Mällinen
Juha S Tapanainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oulu University Hospital, PL 24, 90029 OYS, Oulu, Finland. Eila.Suvanto-Luukkonen@oulu.fi
Source
Menopause. 2005 Jan-Feb;12(1):18-26
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Citalopram - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Female
Fluoxetine - therapeutic use
Hot Flashes - prevention & control
Humans
Menopause
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - drug therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Nonhormonal treatment of postmenopausal symptoms is a subject of great interest today. The results of studies on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are promising, but long-term results do not exist. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of citalopram and fluoxetine in the treatment of physical and psychological menopausal symptoms and their effects on psychosocial and sexual well being in symptomatic postmenopausal women. DESIGN: One hundred fifty healthy women suffering from menopausal symptoms were recruited to this placebo-controlled double-blind study with a follow-up period of 9 months. They were randomized into three groups receiving placebo, fluoxetine, or citalopram. The initial dose was 10 mg of both fluoxetine and citalopram, and it was increased to 20 mg at 1 month and to 30 mg at the 6-month visit. The main outcome measures were hot flushes and Kupperman index. The RAND-36 Quality of Life questionnaire, Beck's Depression Scale, and the McCoy Female Sexuality Questionnaire were used at every control visit. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in respect to number of hot flushes, Kupperman index, or Beck's Depression Scale, although there was a tendency in all these parameters in favor of SSRIs versus placebo. Insomnia improved significantly in the citalopram group versus placebo. Discontinuation rates at nine months were 40% in the placebo group, 34% in the fluoxetine group and 34% in the citalopram group. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with placebo, citalopram and fluoxetine have little effect on hot flushes and cannot therefore be recommended for the treatment of menopausal symptoms, if vasomotor symptoms are the main complaint. Whether the improvement of insomnia by means of citalopram affects the quality of sleep needs further investigation.
PubMed ID
15668596 View in PubMed
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Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders Associated with Asperger Syndrome/High-functioning Autism: A Community- and Clinic-based Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97940
Source
J Autism Dev Disord. 2010 Feb 23;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-23-2010
Author
Marja-Leena Mattila
Tuula Hurtig
Helena Haapsamo
Katja Jussila
Sanna Kuusikko-Gauffin
Marko Kielinen
Sirkka-Liisa Linna
Hanna Ebeling
Risto Bloigu
Leena Joskitt
David L Pauls
Irma Moilanen
Author Affiliation
Clinic of Child Psychiatry, University Hospital of Oulu, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 26, 90029, Oulu, Finland, marja-leena.mattila@fimnet.fi.
Source
J Autism Dev Disord. 2010 Feb 23;
Date
Feb-23-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The present study identifies the prevalence and types of comorbid psychiatric disorders associated with Asperger syndrome (AS)/high-functioning autism (HFA) in a combined community- and clinic-based sample of fifty 9- to 16-year-old subjects using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children, Present and Lifetime Version. The level of functioning was estimated using the Children's Global Assessment Scale. The results support common (prevalence 74%) and often multiple comorbid psychiatric disorders in AS/HFA; behavioral disorders were shown in 44%, anxiety disorders in 42% and tic disorders in 26%. Oppositional defiant disorder, major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders as comorbid conditions indicated significantly lower levels of functioning. To target interventions, routine evaluation of psychiatric comorbidity in subjects with AS/HFA is emphasized.
PubMed ID
20177765 View in PubMed
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Comparison of clinical and computerized image analyses in the assessment of skin ageing in smokers and non-smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67177
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2004;84(6):422-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Anina Raitio
Jukka Kontinen
Mikko Rasi
Risto Bloigu
Juha Röning
Aarne Oikarinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Oulu University Hospital, Finland. anina.raitio@oulu.fi
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2004;84(6):422-7
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Male
Middle Aged
Photography
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skin Aging - pathology
Smoking - adverse effects - pathology
Abstract
Tobacco smoke and UV radiation are extrinsic risk factors for accelerated skin ageing. In this study the effects of smoking on wrinkling and ageing were assessed in males living in Northern Finland, where cumulative sun exposure is low. Smoking habits, age and facial wrinkling were estimated from facial photographs of 41 smokers and 48 non-smokers by eight panellists, using a blinded standardized assessment. Wrinkling of 26 smokers and 31 non-smokers was also assessed by computerized image analysis. The panellists identified 68% of the smokers correctly as being smokers and the smokers were estimated as being an average of 2.1 years older than their age by the panellists, whereas the non-smokers were estimated as being an average of 0.7 years younger than their age (p
PubMed ID
15844630 View in PubMed
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A descriptive quantitative study of 7- and 8-year-old children's outdoor recreation, cold exposure and symptoms in winter in Northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290426
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1298883
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Hanna Rasi
Heli Kuivila
Tarja Pölkki
Risto Bloigu
Hannu Rintamäki
Marjo Tourula
Author Affiliation
a Nursing and Health Administration Science Research Unit , Oulu University , Oulu , Finland.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1298883
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Child
Child health
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypesthesia - epidemiology
Male
Pain - epidemiology
Recreation
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology
Seasons
Time Factors
Abstract
In Finland, children spend a lot of time outdoors in winter. Outdoor recreation in winter has a wide variety of effects on children's well-being. Although children are a subgroup that is vulnerable to cold exposure, remarkably little research has been done on the subject.
The aim of this study was to describe children's outdoor recreation, cold exposure and symptoms in winter in Northern Finland.
This was a descriptive quantitative study. The participants consisted of 30 children aged 7-8 years who were living in the provinces of Lapland and Northern Ostrobothnia in Finland. Data were collected by using electronic data-logging thermometers fixed on children's outerwear for a month. The thermometers recorded the environmental temperature every five minutes and from that temperature data, we were able to discern the exact amount and duration of children's outdoor recreation. In addition, information on the children's cold symptoms was collected with structured daily entries.
Cold weather was not an obstacle to children's outdoor activities in Finland. However, the duration of outdoor recreation shortened when the outdoor air temperature decreased. There were no significant differences between boys and girls in terms of time spent outdoors. Remarkably, every child reported symptoms associated with cold. Almost half of the children reported experiencing respiratory symptoms and some children also experienced cold pain and numbness.
The results of this study illustrate the many and varied effects that cold exposure can have on children's health and well-being. In order to prevent negative health effects of cold exposure on children, structured prevention strategies are needed: therefore, children's exposure to cold should be studied more. Future research should also bring out more the positive health effects of outdoor recreation on children's growth and development.????.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28346080 View in PubMed
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41 records – page 1 of 5.