Skip header and navigation

Refine By

39 records – page 1 of 4.

Accumulation of Major Life Events in Childhood and Adult Life and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273707
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0138654
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jolene Masters Pedersen
Naja Hulvej Rod
Ingelise Andersen
Theis Lange
Gry Poulsen
Eva Prescott
Rikke Lund
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0138654
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Change Events
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Risk Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - complications
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to estimate the effect of the accumulation of major life events (MLE) in childhood and adulthood, in both the private and working domains, on risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Furthermore, we aimed to test the possible interaction between childhood and adult MLE and to investigate modification of these associations by educational attainment.
The study was based on 4,761 participants from the Copenhagen City Heart Study free of diabetes at baseline and followed for 10 years. MLE were categorized as 0, 1, 2, 3 or more events. Multivariate logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, education and family history of diabetes were used to estimate the association between MLE and T2DM.
In childhood, experiencing 3 or more MLE was associated with a 69% higher risk of developing T2DM (Odds Ratio (OR) 1.69; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.60, 3.27). The accumulation of MLE in adult private (p-trend = 0.016) and work life (p-trend = 0.049) was associated with risk of T2DM in a dose response manner. There was no evidence that experiencing MLE in both childhood and adult life was more strongly associated with T2DM than experiencing events at only one time point. There was some evidence that being simultaneously exposed to childhood MLE and short education (OR 2.28; 95% C.I. 1.45, 3.59) and work MLE and short education (OR 2.86; 95% C.I. 1.62, 5.03) was associated with higher risk of T2DM, as the joint effects were greater than the sum of their individual effects.
Findings from this study suggest that the accumulation of MLE in childhood, private adult life and work life, respectively, are risk factors for developing T2DM.
Notes
Cites: Psychol Med. 2004 Apr;34(3):509-2015259836
Cites: Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2005 Jan;30(1):1-1015358437
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 2003;(418):61-612956817
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2004 Sep 27;164(17):1873-8015451762
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 1967 Aug;11(2):213-86059863
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1987;25(6):567-783317881
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 1990 Jun;31(2):162-722102495
Cites: Epidemiology. 1992 Sep;3(5):452-61391139
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1996 Dec;49(12):1407-178970491
Cites: Epidemiology. 1999 Jan;10(1):37-489888278
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2004 Dec;1032:276-815677427
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2006 Jan;60(1):7-1216361448
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2007 Oct 16;147(8):W163-9417938389
Cites: Pediatrics. 2008 May;121(5):e1240-918450866
Cites: Diabet Med. 2008 Jul;25(7):834-4218513304
Cites: Diabet Med. 2008 Oct;25(10):1211-719046200
Cites: Ann Med. 2009;41(1):66-7218720095
Cites: J Intern Med. 2009 Nov;266(5):467-7519570055
Cites: Discov Med. 2010 Feb;9(45):112-820193636
Cites: Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 2010 Sep;39(3):481-9720723815
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2010 Dec;39(6):529-3621084073
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2011 Aug;40(4):904-1321441553
Cites: Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2012 Feb;14(1):8-1422094982
Cites: Physiol Behav. 2012 Apr 12;106(1):29-3921888923
Cites: Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2014 Jan-Feb;36(1):26-3224183489
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2014 Feb;24(1):57-6223397581
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2000 Feb;23(2):197-20110868831
Cites: Scand Cardiovasc J. 2001 Jul;35(3):172-711515689
Cites: J Aging Health. 2002 Nov;14(4):467-9412392001
PubMed ID
26394040 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addressing social inequality in aging by the Danish occupational social class measurement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104848
Source
J Aging Health. 2014 Feb;26(1):106-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Ulla Christensen
Rikke Krølner
Charlotte J Nilsson
Pernille W Lyngbye
Charlotte Ø Hougaard
Else Nygaard
Karsten Thielen
Bjørn E Holstein
Kirsten Avlund
Rikke Lund
Author Affiliation
University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Aging Health. 2014 Feb;26(1):106-27
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Occupations
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Social Class
Abstract
To present the Danish Occupational Social Class (DOSC) measurement as a measure of socioeconomic position (SEP) applicable in a late midlife population, and to analyze associations of this measure with three aging-related outcomes in midlife, adjusting for education.
Systematic coding procedures of the DOSC measurement were applied to 7,084 participants from the Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank (CAMB) survey. We examined the association of this measure of SEP with chronic conditions, self-rated health, and mobility in logistic regression analyses, adjusting for school education in the final analysis.
The measure of SEP showed a strong social gradient along the social classes in terms of prevalence of chronic conditions, poor self-rated health, and mobility limitations. Adjusting for school education attenuated the association only to a minor degree.
The DOSC measure was associated with aging-related outcomes in a midlife Danish population, and is, thus, well suited for future epidemiological research on social inequalities in health and aging.
PubMed ID
24584263 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are negative aspects of social relations predictive of angina pectoris? A 6-year follow-up study of middle-aged Danish women and men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138427
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Apr;66(4):359-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Rikke Lund
Naja Hulvej Rod
Ulla Christensen
Author Affiliation
Section of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, Postbox 2099, DK-1014 Copenhagen K, Denmark. r.lund@sund.ku.dk
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Apr;66(4):359-65
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Angina Pectoris - complications - psychology
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Social Class
Social Support
Unemployment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Work - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Social relations have been shown to be protective against ischaemic heart disease (IHD), but little is known about the impact of negative aspects of the social relations on IHD.
During a 6-year follow-up, the authors aimed to assess if negative aspects of social relations were associated with angina pectoris among 4573 middle-aged Danish men and women free of heart disease at baseline in 2000.
Nine per cent experienced onset of symptoms of angina pectoris. A higher degree of excessive demands or worries from the social relations was associated with increased risk of angina after adjustment for age, gender, social class, cohabitation status and depression in a dose-response manner. For example, experiencing excessive demands or worries always/often from different roles in the social relations was associated with an increased risk: partner OR=3.53 (1.68 to 7.43), children OR=2.19 (1.04 to 4.61), other family OR=1.91 (1.24 to 2.96). Except for frequent conflicts with the partner and neighbours, conflicts with the social relations was not a risk factor for angina. The authors found no interaction of negative aspects of social relations with gender, age, social class, cohabitation status or depression in terms of angina.
Excessive demands and serious worries from significant others seem to be important risk factors for development of angina pectoris.
PubMed ID
21177663 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between idiopathic environmental intolerance and psychological distress, and the influence of social support and recent major life events.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135934
Source
Environ Health Prev Med. 2012 Jan;17(1):2-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Sine Skovbjerg
Alice Rasmussen
Robert Zachariae
Lone Schmidt
Rikke Lund
Jesper Elberling
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermato-Allergology, The Danish Research Centre for Chemical Sensitivities, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Ledreborg Alle 40, 2, 2820, Gentofte, Denmark. sinsko01@geh.regionh.dk
Source
Environ Health Prev Med. 2012 Jan;17(1):2-9
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Chemical Sensitivity - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Principal Component Analysis
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Social Support
Somatoform Disorders - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI) is a disorder characterized by non-specific symptoms attributed to common airborne chemicals. Increasing evidence points to an association between IEI and symptoms of psychological distress. However, whether other risk factors influence this association has not been clarified. The objective of this study was to examine the association between psychological distress and IEI and to determine whether the association is confounded by social support and major life events.
Data were collected by postal questionnaires; other results from the study have been published previously in this journal. The study included participants from a general population-based study who had reported symptoms of chemical sensitivities (n = 787) and two patient groups. The first patient group (n = 101) included individuals who had contacted the Danish Research Centre for Chemical Sensitivities, and the second included individuals who had been diagnosed with environmental intolerance (n = 136). Multiple, hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted with four IEI-related domains, i.e., mucosal and CNS symptoms, chemical intolerances and social consequences, as the dependent variables, and psychological distress, social support and major life events as the independent variables.
Our study confirmed positive and statistically significant associations between psychological distress and IEI. The associations remained statistically significant after adjusting for major life events and social support.
The results suggest that the association between IEI and psychological distress cannot be explained by known risk factors. More studies, including longitudinal studies, are needed to determine the role of psychological distress in the development and course of IEI.
Notes
Cites: Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2005;208(3):141-5115971853
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2004 Sep;110(3):225-915283743
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2005 Aug;78(7):559-6416001204
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 2004 Jun;59(6):300-516238164
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 2006 Feb;60(2):199-20916439274
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 2006 Apr;60(4):353-616581358
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2006 Jun;113(6):477-8416677224
Cites: Psychother Psychosom Med Psychol. 2006 Mar-Apr;56(3-4):162-7116802422
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 2006 Aug;115(3):397-40716866581
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2006 Sep;38(5):316-2116931462
Cites: Psychol Med. 2007 Feb;37(2):271-8117109778
Cites: Hum Exp Toxicol. 2007 Mar;26(3):231-4117439926
Cites: Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2007 Aug;15(4):274-8017620903
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2008 Jul;81(7):881-718058120
Cites: Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2008 Jun;37(6):339-5218191990
Cites: Psychol Med. 2009 Mar;39(3):497-50518578896
Cites: Psychosom Med. 2009 Feb;71(2):187-9519073754
Cites: Occup Med. 1987 Oct-Dec;2(4):655-613313760
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1991 Aug 29;325(9):606-121713648
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1994;377:50-88053367
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 1995 Apr;56(4):151-607713854
Cites: Toxicol Ind Health. 1994 Jul-Oct;10(4-5):487-967778109
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1998 Feb 1;147(3):232-99482497
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1999 Mar;48(5):661-7310080366
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1999 Jun;156(6):837-4110360120
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Jul 1;150(1):1-1210400546
Cites: Toxicol Ind Health. 1999 Apr-Jun;15(3-4):295-30410416281
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1999 May-Jun;54(3):147-910444033
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1999 Feb;56(2):73-8510448311
Cites: Med Hypotheses. 2009 Jun;72(6):701-519237251
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 2009 May;66(5):407-1619379957
Cites: Eur J Pain. 2010 Feb;14(2):127.e1-819473857
Cites: Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2010 Jun;12(3):208-1420425282
Cites: Clin J Pain. 2011 Feb;27(2):156-6221268302
Cites: Am J Med Genet. 2000 Apr 3;96(2):146-5310893486
Cites: Occup Med. 2000 Jul-Sep;15(3):557-7010903550
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2002 Oct;44(10):890-90112391767
Cites: Psychosom Med. 2003 Jul-Aug;65(4):528-3312883101
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2004 Feb;109(2):96-10314725589
Cites: Psychother Psychosom. 2004 May-Jun;73(3):174-8215031590
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2004 May;94(5):746-715117694
Cites: Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2005;208(4):271-816078641
PubMed ID
21431806 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can the higher risk of disability onset among older people who live alone be alleviated by strong social relations? A longitudinal study of non-disabled men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97796
Source
Age Ageing. 2010 May;39(3):319-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Rikke Lund
Charlotte Juul Nilsson
Kirsten Avlund
Author Affiliation
Section of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. r.lund@sund.ku.dk
Source
Age Ageing. 2010 May;39(3):319-26
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment
Health status
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Social Isolation
Social Support
Abstract
PURPOSE: to investigate if the increased risk of disability onset among older people who live alone could possibly be moderated by either high social participation or by being satisfied with the social relations. DESIGN AND METHODS: logistic regression models were tested using two waves in a study population of 2,697 non-disabled older men and women from The Danish Longitudinal Study on Preventive Home Visits. RESULTS: living alone and low social participation were significant risk factors for later male disability onset. Not being satisfied with the social relations was significantly associated with onset of disability for both genders. Among men who lived alone low social participation was a significant predictor of disability onset [odds ratio, OR = 2.30 (1.00-5.29)]; for cohabiting men social participation was not associated with disability onset, [adjusted OR = 0.91 (0.49-1.71)]. Similar results were present concerning satisfaction with the social relations among men. There was no significant interaction for women. CONCLUSIONS: the study suggests that men who live alone can possibly alleviate their risk of disability onset by being socially active and by having access to satisfactory social relations. Women do not seem to benefit as much from cohabitation as men, although women who live alone and who are not satisfied with their social relations also constitute a significant risk category.
PubMed ID
20208073 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood social circumstances and body mass index in adult life: the Metropolit 1953 Danish male birth cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136786
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 May;39(3):296-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Anne-Mette Larsen
Rikke Lund
Margit Kriegbaum
Kirsten Avlund
Merete Osler
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Institut of Public Health, 1014 Copenhagen K, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 May;39(3):296-302
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Child
Cognition - physiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Fathers
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine whether father's social class was associated with body mass index (BMI) at age 20 and 50 years in a cohort of men born in 1953 and to explore the role of birth weight, cognitive function (IQ), and educational status in these relationships.
We used data from the Metropolit cohort which includes 11,532 Danish men born in 1953 with information on father's socioeconomic position (SEP) at participant's birth and assessments of height, weight, cognitive performance, and education at age 20. In 2004, 6292 of these men participated in a follow-up survey on health and behaviour. Linear and logistic regression were used to investigate the association of father's social class with BMI among the 5117 men with complete information on all variables.
Between age 20 and 50, mean BMI increased from 21.4 to 26.1 kg/m(2), while the prevalence of overweight (BMI =25 kg/m(2)) increased from 8.1 to 57.8%. Men of fathers who were skilled or unskilled workers had higher odds of being overweight (OR = 1.32, 95% CI 1.13-1.53) or often obese (OR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.03-1.60) at age 50 years compared to those with fathers being self-employed, employee, or civil servants when adjusted for the other socially correlated indicators of impaired childhood development. In the linear regression analyses, mean BMI at both age 20 and 50 were around 0.3 kg/m(2) higher in men with fathers from working class compared to those self-employed, employee, or civil servants.
This study supports that among men, father's SEP influences the development of obesity later in adult life.
PubMed ID
21343314 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cohabitation and marital status as predictors of mortality--an eight year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31420
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2002 Aug;55(4):673-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Rikke Lund
Pernille Due
Jens Modvig
Bjørn Evald Holstein
Mogens Trab Damsgaard
Per Kragh Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. r.lund@socmed.ku.dk
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2002 Aug;55(4):673-9
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Distribution
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Family Characteristics
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Self Concept
Sex Distribution
Single Person - statistics & numerical data
Spouses - statistics & numerical data
Survival Analysis
Abstract
In a follow-up study of 1265 women and men aged 50, 60 and 70 years, we analysed how mortality was associated with cohabitation status (living alone/not living alone), living with/without a partner, and marital status respectively. Data originate from a longitudinal questionnaire study of a random sample of people born in 1920, 1930 and 1940 with baseline in 1990. Survival time for all individuals were established during the next 8 years until May 1998. Multivariate Cox analysis stratified by age and gender showed that individuals living alone experienced a significantly increased mortality compared to individuals living with somebody HR = 1.42(1.04-1.95) adjusted for functional ability, self-rated health, having children, smoking, diet and physical activity. Similar analyses were performed for the variable living with/without a partner HR = 1.38(1.01-1.88) and marital status HR = 1.25(0.93-1.69), adjusted for the same covariates. Inclusion of the health behaviour variables--smoking, diet and physical activity--one by one to a model with functional ability, self-rated health and one of the three determinants (cohabitation status, living with/without partner, marital status) showed no effect on the association with mortality. Hereby, we found no evidence of an indirect effect of health behaviours on the association between living arrangements and mortality. In contrast to many previous studies, we found no significant gender and age differences in the association between living arrangement and mortality. We suggest that in future studies of social relations and mortality, cohabitation status is considered to replace marital status as this variable may account for more of the variation in mortality.
PubMed ID
12188471 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cohabitation status and onset of disability among older Danes: is social participation a possible mediator?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159745
Source
J Aging Health. 2008 Mar;20(2):235-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Charlotte Juul Nilsson
Rikke Lund
Kirsten Avlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen K. c.nilsson@socmed.ku.dk
Source
J Aging Health. 2008 Mar;20(2):235-53
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Male
Residence Characteristics
Social Environment
Social Support
Abstract
To investigate the effect of cohabitation status in older men and women on (a) onset of disability at 3- and 4.5-year follow-up and (b) changes in functional ability between 3- and 4.5-year follow-up, and to analyze whether this effect was mediated by social participation.
A total of 2,533 nondisabled older men and women enrolled in the Danish Intervention Study on Preventive Home Visits constituted the study population. Data were collected by mailed questionnaires in 1998-1999, 2000, 2001-2002, and 2003.
Living alone significantly increased the risk of onset of disability (T3 OR = 1.60[1.06-2.43], T4 OR = 1.74[1.22-2.47]) and the risk of sustained poor functional ability (OR = 2.35[1.44-3.84]) among men, but not among single-living women. Social participation mediated only a small part of the effect of cohabitation status on functional ability.
Our results underline the importance of cohabitation/marriage for maintaining a high functional ability among older men.
PubMed ID
18089766 View in PubMed
Less detail

Content validity and reliability of the Copenhagen social relations questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104847
Source
J Aging Health. 2014 Feb;26(1):128-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Rikke Lund
Lene Snabe Nielsen
Pia Wichmann Henriksen
Lone Schmidt
Kirsten Avlund
Ulla Christensen
Author Affiliation
University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Aging Health. 2014 Feb;26(1):128-50
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Social Support
Abstract
The aim of the present article is to describe the face and content validity as well as reliability of the Copenhagen Social Relations Questionnaire (CSRQ).
The face and content validity test was based on focus group discussions and individual interviews with 31 informants. Another 94 men and women participated in an 8-day test-retest analysis.
Informants generally expressed that the questions and response categories were relevant and easy to understand. Themes on structure of social relations, social support, and negative aspects of social relations emerged clearly from the interviews. Two additional themes not covered by CSRQ on dynamics and reciprocity of social relations were identified.
CSRQ holds satisfactory face and content validity as well as reliability, and is suitable for measuring structure and function of social relations including the negative aspects among middle-aged individuals.
PubMed ID
24584264 View in PubMed
Less detail

39 records – page 1 of 4.