Skip header and navigation

Refine By

17 records – page 1 of 2.

Alkylresorcinol metabolism in Swedish adults is affected by factors other than intake of whole-grain wheat and rye.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123046
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Aug;142(8):1479-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Matti Marklund
Rikard Landberg
Roger Andersson
Per Aman
Afaf Kamal-Eldin
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science, BioCenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden. matti.marklund@slu.se
Source
J Nutr. 2012 Aug;142(8):1479-86
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Biological Markers
Body mass index
Dietary Fiber
Female
Food analysis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Resorcinols - metabolism - urine
Secale cereale
Sex Factors
Sweden
Triticum
Young Adult
Abstract
The urinary alkylresorcinol (AR) metabolites, 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) and 3-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-propanoic acid (DHPPA), could potentially serve as biomarkers for intake of whole-grain (WG) wheat and rye. Excretion of AR metabolites is largely dependent on the intake of AR but may also be influenced by other factors. This study aimed to investigate the validity of free and conjugated AR metabolites as biomarkers for WG intake of wheat and rye and to identify potential determinants of AR metabolites in urine. We quantified free aglycones and conjugates of AR metabolites in 24-h urine collections from 52 free-living Swedish adults and calculated correlation coefficients between urinary AR metabolite excretion and self-reported WG intake. We used partial least-squares regression to identify possible determinants of urinary AR metabolites. Approximately 50% of urinary AR metabolites were found as conjugates. Excretions of individually quantified free and conjugated AR metabolites and their sums were correlated to self-reported intake of WG rye and wheat (r = 0.50-0.68; P
PubMed ID
22739366 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alkylresorcinol metabolites in urine correlate with the intake of whole grains and cereal fibre in free-living Swedish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125563
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Jan 14;109(1):129-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-14-2013
Author
Matti Marklund
Rikard Landberg
Agneta Andersson
Per Åman
Afaf Kamal-Eldin
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7051, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden. matti.marklund@slu.se
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Jan 14;109(1):129-36
Date
Jan-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Alkylation
Biological Markers - urine
Cereals - chemistry - metabolism
Creatinine - urine
Diet Records
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage - metabolism
Female
Food Handling
Humans
Hydroxybenzoates - metabolism - urine
Male
Middle Aged
Phenols - metabolism - urine
Phenylpropionates
Propionates - metabolism - urine
Reproducibility of Results
Resorcinols - metabolism - urine
Secale cereale - chemistry
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Alkylresorcinols (AR) have been established as short/medium-term biomarkers for whole grain (WG) wheat and rye intake; and AR metabolites, 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 3-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-propanoic acid, have been suggested as complementary biomarkers to AR. The present study examined the medium-term reproducibility and relative validity of urinary AR metabolites as biomarkers for WG and cereal fibre intake. A total of sixty-six free-living Swedes completed 3 d weighed food records and provided single 24 h urine collections and morning urine spot samples on two occasions, 2-3 months apart. The medium-term reproducibility of urinary AR metabolites was moderate when assessed in 24 h collections and lower in creatinine (CR)-adjusted morning urine. Mean AR metabolite 24 h excretions correlated well with total WG (r(s) 0·31-0·52, P
PubMed ID
22470195 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between school meal-induced dietary changes and metabolic syndrome markers in 8-11-year-old Danish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281572
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Aug;55(5):1973-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Camilla T Damsgaard
Christian Ritz
Stine-Mathilde Dalskov
Rikard Landberg
Ken D Stark
Anja Biltoft-Jensen
Inge Tetens
Arne Astrup
Kim F Michaelsen
Lotte Lauritzen
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Aug;55(5):1973-84
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Child
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Cluster analysis
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage - analysis
Docosahexaenoic Acids - blood
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Fishes
Food Services
Fruit
Healthy Diet
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Meals
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood
Schools
Seafood
Treatment Outcome
Triglycerides - blood
Vegetables
Waist Circumference
Abstract
We recently showed that provision of Nordic school meals rich in fish, vegetables and potatoes and with reduced intakes of fat improved blood pressure, insulin resistance assessed by the homeostatic model (HOMA-IR), and plasma triacylglycerol despite increasing waist circumference in Danish 8-11-year-olds. This study explored whether intake or biomarkers of key dietary components in the schools meals were associated with these metabolic syndrome (MetS) markers during the 6-month intervention.
Data from 7-day dietary records and measurements of whole-blood docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), blood pressure, fasting blood MetS markers, waist circumference and android/total fat mass assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months from 523 children were analyzed in linear mixed-effects models adjusted for puberty, growth and fasting.
After adjustment for multiple testing, whole-blood DHA was negatively associated with HOMA-IR (P 
PubMed ID
27084093 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of whole-grain rye porridge with added inulin and wheat gluten on appetite, gut fermentation and postprandial glucose metabolism: a randomised, cross-over, breakfast study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282573
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Dec;116(12):2139-2149
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Isabella Lee
Lin Shi
Dominic-Luc Webb
Per M Hellström
Ulf Risérus
Rikard Landberg
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Dec;116(12):2139-2149
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Appetite Regulation
Biomarkers - analysis - blood
Breakfast
Cross-Over Studies
Energy intake
Female
Fermentation
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Glutens - administration & dosage - metabolism
Humans
Hyperglycemia - blood - prevention & control
Hyperinsulinism - blood - prevention & control
Inulin - administration & dosage - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Postprandial Period
Secale - chemistry
Single-Blind Method
Sweden
Triticum - chemistry
Whole Grains - chemistry
Young Adult
Abstract
Whole-grain rye foods reduce appetite, insulin and sometimes glucose responses. Increased gut fermentation and plant protein may mediate the effect. The aims of the present study were to investigate whether the appetite-suppressing effects of whole-grain rye porridge could be enhanced by replacing part of the rye with fermented dietary fibre and plant protein, and to explore the role of gut fermentation on appetite and metabolic responses over 8 h. We conducted a randomised, cross-over study using two rye porridges (40 and 55 g), three 40-g rye porridges with addition of inulin:gluten (9:3; 6:6; 3:9 g) and a refined wheat bread control (55 g), served as part of complete breakfasts. A standardised lunch and an ad libitum dinner were served 4 and 8 h later, respectively. Appetite, breath hydrogen and methane, glucose, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) responses were measured over 8 h. Twenty-one healthy men and women, aged 23-60 years, with BMI of 21-33 kg/m2 participated in this study. Before lunch, the 55-g rye porridges lowered hunger by 20 % and desire to eat by 22 % and increased fullness by 29 % compared with wheat bread (P
PubMed ID
28069076 View in PubMed
Less detail

Higher Whole-Grain Intake Is Associated with Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes among Middle-Aged Men and Women: The Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299891
Source
J Nutr. 2018 09 01; 148(9):1434-1444
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-01-2018
Author
Cecilie Kyrø
Anne Tjønneland
Kim Overvad
Anja Olsen
Rikard Landberg
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Nutr. 2018 09 01; 148(9):1434-1444
Date
09-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Avena
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Diet Records
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Secale
Surveys and Questionnaires
Triticum
Whole Grains
Abstract
Type 2 diabetes is a major health concern worldwide. Whole grains and cereal fiber may offer protective effects on type 2 diabetes risk. However, few studies have been conducted in cohorts with detailed information on whole-grain cereal intakes and product types and with wide ranges of intake.
We investigated the associations between whole-grain intake, including intakes of different cereal types and products, and the risk of type 2 diabetes in a population with wide and diverse whole-grain intake.
We used data from the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort including 55,465 participants aged 50-65 y at baseline. Of these, 7417 participants were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes during follow-up (median: 15 y). Detailed information on the intake of whole-grain products was available from a food-frequency questionnaire, and total whole-grain intake and whole-grain cereal types (wheat, rye, oats) were calculated in grams per day. Associations were examined by using Cox proportional hazards models with adjustment for potential confounders.
Whole-grain intake was associated with an 11% and 7% lower risk of type 2 diabetes per whole-grain serving (16 g) per day for men and women, respectively [HR (95% CI)-men: 0.89 (0.87, 0.91); women: 0.93 (0.91, 0.96)]. For men, the intake of all whole-grain cereal types investigated (wheat, rye, oats) was significantly associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, but only wheat and oats intake was significantly associated for women. Among the different whole-grain products, rye bread, whole-grain bread, and oatmeal/muesli were significantly associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes for both men and women.
In this cohort study, we found consistent associations between high whole-grain intake and lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Overall, an association was found for all different cereals and whole-grain products tested.
PubMed ID
30016529 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of sourdough fermentation on appetite and postprandial metabolic responses - a randomised cross-over trial with whole grain rye crispbread.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287606
Source
Br J Nutr. 2017 Nov;118(9):686-697
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Galia Zamaratskaia
Daniel P Johansson
Matheus Antunes Junqueira
Linda Deissler
Maud Langton
Per M Hellström
Rikard Landberg
Source
Br J Nutr. 2017 Nov;118(9):686-697
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Appetite
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Bread
Breakfast
Cross-Over Studies
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Digestion
Female
Fermented Foods
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 - blood
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Postprandial Period
Satiation
Secale - chemistry
Single-Blind Method
Sweden
Triticum - chemistry
Whole Grains - chemistry
Young Adult
Abstract
Sourdough fermentation is considered to have beneficial effects on postprandial satiety and metabolic responses, but studies demonstrating effects at physiological conditions are lacking. The aim of this acute breakfast intervention study was to determine the effect of consumption of sourdough-fermented and unfermented rye crispbread on self-rated appetite, postprandial glucose and insulin response in healthy subjects. In all, twenty-four Swedish adults were included in a single-blinded, randomised cross-over trial. Three crispbreads (sourdough-fermented and unfermented whole grain rye and yeast-fermented refined wheat as control) were consumed as part of a standardised breakfast. Subjective appetite score, assessed using visual analogue scale, and plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured at baseline and postprandially until 360 and 240 min, respectively. Structural changes and viscosity during mastication and gastric digestion were investigated using in vitro methods. Hunger and desire to eat were lower (P
PubMed ID
29185930 View in PubMed
Less detail

Indolepropionic acid and novel lipid metabolites are associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296231
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 04 11; 7:46337
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-11-2017
Author
Vanessa D de Mello
Jussi Paananen
Jaana Lindström
Maria A Lankinen
Lin Shi
Johanna Kuusisto
Jussi Pihlajamäki
Seppo Auriola
Marko Lehtonen
Olov Rolandsson
Ingvar A Bergdahl
Elise Nordin
Pirjo Ilanne-Parikka
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Rikard Landberg
Johan G Eriksson
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Kati Hanhineva
Matti Uusitupa
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 04 11; 7:46337
Date
04-11-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Amino Acids - metabolism
Bile Acids and Salts - metabolism
Biomarkers
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Dietary Fiber
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Indoles - adverse effects
Insulin - secretion
Life Style
Lipid Metabolism
Lipids - adverse effects
Male
Metabolomics - methods
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
Wide-scale profiling technologies including metabolomics broaden the possibility of novel discoveries related to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D). By applying non-targeted metabolomics approach, we investigated here whether serum metabolite profile predicts T2D in a well-characterized study population with impaired glucose tolerance by examining two groups of individuals who took part in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS); those who either early developed T2D (n?=?96) or did not convert to T2D within the 15-year follow-up (n?=?104). Several novel metabolites were associated with lower likelihood of developing T2D, including indole and lipid related metabolites. Higher indolepropionic acid was associated with reduced likelihood of T2D in the DPS. Interestingly, in those who remained free of T2D, indolepropionic acid and various lipid species were associated with better insulin secretion and sensitivity, respectively. Furthermore, these metabolites were negatively correlated with low-grade inflammation. We replicated the association between indolepropionic acid and T2D risk in one Finnish and one Swedish population. We suggest that indolepropionic acid, a gut microbiota-produced metabolite, is a potential biomarker for the development of T2D that may mediate its protective effect by preservation of ß-cell function. Novel lipid metabolites associated with T2D may exert their effects partly through enhancing insulin sensitivity.
Notes
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2014 Jun;37(6):1751-8 PMID 24812433
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2013 Mar;67(3):259-63 PMID 23388668
Cites: Adv Nutr. 2016 Jul 15;7(4):730-4 PMID 27422507
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2013 Mar;36(3):648-55 PMID 23129134
Cites: J Appl Bacteriol. 1996 Sep;81(3):288-302 PMID 8810056
Cites: Cytokine. 2016 Oct;86:100-9 PMID 27498215
Cites: Nature. 2012 Oct 4;490(7418):55-60 PMID 23023125
Cites: Nature. 2016 Jul 21;535(7612):376-81 PMID 27409811
Cites: J Biol Chem. 2009 Dec 4;284(49):33833-40 PMID 19815546
Cites: Nat Commun. 2015 Jul 21;6:7715 PMID 26197299
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2013 Jun;98(6):E1060-5 PMID 23633210
Cites: J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci. 2015 Sep 1;1000:120-9 PMID 26218771
Cites: J Cell Biochem. 2001;81(3):507-13 PMID 11255233
Cites: Cell Rep. 2014 Nov 20;9(4):1202-8 PMID 25456122
Cites: PeerJ. 2013 Feb 26;1:e32 PMID 23638368
Cites: Front Neurosci. 2015 Jun 16;9:216 PMID 26136651
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2012 Aug;35(8):1749-56 PMID 22563043
Cites: Diabetologia. 2013 Feb;56(2):284-93 PMID 23093136
Cites: Anal Chem. 2006 Feb 1;78(3):779-87 PMID 16448051
Cites: Diabetologia. 2015 Jul;58(7):1394-408 PMID 26021487
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2012 Jun;30(2):81-7 PMID 22643152
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2011 May;34 Suppl 2:S258-63 PMID 21525465
Cites: Immunity. 2014 Aug 21;41(2):296-310 PMID 25065623
Cites: Eur J Endocrinol. 2014 Aug;171(2):R47-65 PMID 24760535
Cites: Curr Opin Gastroenterol. 2014 May;30(3):332-8 PMID 24625896
Cites: Molecules. 2015 Jan 30;20(2):2425-44 PMID 25647578
Cites: Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2015 Jul;25(7):635-42 PMID 25921846
Cites: Diabetes. 2009 May;58(5):1212-21 PMID 19223598
Cites: Gut Microbes. 2012 Jul-Aug;3(4):279-88 PMID 22572877
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Jan;101(1):233-42 PMID 26505825
Cites: Diabetes. 2013 Dec;62(12):4184-91 PMID 23884887
Cites: Diabetes. 2013 Feb;62(2):639-48 PMID 23043162
Cites: Gut. 2016 Feb;65(2):330-9 PMID 26338727
Cites: Gut. 2016 Nov;65(11):1812-1821 PMID 26416813
Cites: Microb Ecol. 1997 Apr;33(3):180-8 PMID 9115181
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009 Mar 10;106(10):3698-703 PMID 19234110
Cites: Circ Res. 2015 Oct 9;117(9):817-24 PMID 26358192
Cites: Nat Med. 2011 Apr;17(4):448-53 PMID 21423183
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2012 Feb;35(2):211-7 PMID 22210578
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 May 3;344(18):1343-50 PMID 11333990
Cites: J Nutr. 2015 Jan;145(1):7-17 PMID 25527657
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2013 Jan;36(1):166-75 PMID 23264288
Cites: J Biol Chem. 1999 Jul 30;274(31):21937-42 PMID 10419516
Cites: Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2005 Jan 28;326(4):744-51 PMID 15607732
Cites: PLoS One. 2013 Sep 27;8(9):e74341 PMID 24086336
Cites: Mol Syst Biol. 2012;8:615 PMID 23010998
Cites: Curr Diab Rep. 2014;14(5):482 PMID 24623198
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Dec;102(6):1563-73 PMID 26561617
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Jun;101(6):1241-50 PMID 25948672
Cites: Metabolomics. 2016;12 (11):173 PMID 27746707
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2014 Sep;37(9):2508-14 PMID 24947790
Cites: Diabetes. 2013 Dec;62(12):4270-6 PMID 23884885
Cites: Diabetologia. 2015 Nov;58(11):2533-44 PMID 26277381
PubMed ID
28397877 View in PubMed
Less detail

Intake of dietary fiber, especially from cereal foods, is associated with lower incidence of colon cancer in the HELGA cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131882
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Jul 15;131(2):469-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2012
Author
Louise Hansen
Guri Skeie
Rikard Landberg
Eiliv Lund
Richard Palmqvist
Ingegerd Johansson
Lars O Dragsted
Rikke Egeberg
Nina F Johnsen
Jane Christensen
Kim Overvad
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark. louhan@cancer.dk
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Jul 15;131(2):469-78
Date
Jul-15-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cereals
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Eating
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
The role of dietary fiber on the risk of colon and rectal cancer has been investigated in numerous studies, but findings have been inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between intake of dietary fiber and risk of incident colon (including distal and proximal colon) and rectal cancer in the prospective Scandinavian HELGA cohort and to determine if fiber source (vegetables, fruits, potatoes, cereals) impacted the association. We included 1,168 incident cases (691 colon, 477 rectal cancer), diagnosed during a median of 11.3 years, among 108,081 cohort members. Sex-specific incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of colon and rectal cancer were related to intake of total or specific fiber source using Cox proportional hazards models. For men, an inverse association was observed between intake of total fiber and the risk of colon cancer per an incremental increase of 10 g day(-1) , IRR (95% CI): 0.74 (0.64-0.86). Intake of cereal fiber per 2 g day(-1) was associated with an IRR of 0.94 (0.91-0.98), which was also seen for intake of cereal fiber from foods with high fiber content (= 5 g per 100 g product), where the IRR per 2 g day(-1) was 0.94 (0.90-0.98). In women, intake of cereal fiber per 2 g day(-1) was also associated with lower risk of colon cancer, 0.97 (0.93-1.00). No clear associations were seen for rectal cancer. Our data indicate a protective role of total and cereal fiber intake, particularly from cereal foods with high fiber content, in the prevention of colon cancer.
PubMed ID
21866547 View in PubMed
Less detail

Intake of whole grains and incidence of oesophageal cancer in the HELGA Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285601
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2016 Apr;31(4):405-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Guri Skeie
Tonje Braaten
Anja Olsen
Cecilie Kyrø
Anne Tjønneland
Rikard Landberg
Lena Maria Nilsson
Maria Wennberg
Kim Overvad
Lene Angell Åsli
Elisabete Weiderpass
Eiliv Lund
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2016 Apr;31(4):405-14
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - prevention & control
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - prevention & control
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Whole Grains
Abstract
Few prospective studies have investigated the association between whole-grain consumption and incidence of oesophageal cancer. In the Scandinavian countries, consumption of whole grains is high and the incidence of oesophageal cancer comparably low. The aim of this paper was to study the associations between consumption of whole grains, whole-grain products and oesophageal cancer, including its two major histological subtypes. The HELGA cohort is a prospective cohort study consisting of three sub-cohorts in Norway, Sweden and Denmark. Information regarding whole-grain consumption was collected through country-specific food frequency questionnaires. Cancer cases were identified through national cancer registries. Cox proportional hazards ratios were calculated in order to assess the associations between whole grains and oesophageal cancer risk. The analytical cohort had 113,993 members, including 112 cases, and median follow-up time was 11 years. When comparing the highest tertile of intake with the lowest, the oesophageal cancer risk was approximately 45 % lower (adjusted HR 0.55, 95 % CI 0.31-0.97 for whole grains, HR 0.51, 95 % CI 0.30-0.88 for whole-grain products). Inverse associations were also found in continuous analyses. Whole-grain wheat was the only grain associated with lower risk (HR 0.32, 95 % CI 0.16-0.63 highest vs. lowest tertile). Among whole-grain products, the results were less clear, but protective associations were seen for the sum of whole-grain products, and whole-grain bread. Lower risk was seen in both histological subtypes, but particularly for squamous cell carcinomas. In this study, whole-grain consumption, particularly whole-grain wheat, was inversely associated with risk of oesophageal cancer.
PubMed ID
26092139 View in PubMed
Less detail

Intake of whole grains from different cereal and food sources and incidence of colorectal cancer in the Scandinavian HELGA cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114323
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2013 Jul;24(7):1363-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Cecilie Kyrø
Guri Skeie
Steffen Loft
Rikard Landberg
Jane Christensen
Eiliv Lund
Lena M Nilsson
Richard Palmqvist
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. ceciliek@cancer.dk
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2013 Jul;24(7):1363-74
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cereals
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
A high intake of whole grains has been associated with a lower incidence of colorectal cancer, but few studies are available on the association with whole grains from different cereals, for example, wheat, rye and oats, and none has addressed these separately. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between whole-grain intake and colorectal cancer.
We used data from the large population-based Scandinavian cohort HELGA consisting of 108,000 Danish, Swedish, and Norwegian persons, of whom 1,123 developed colorectal cancer during a median of 11 years of follow-up. Detailed information on daily intake of whole-grain products, including whole-grain bread, crispbread, and breakfast cereals, was available, and intakes of total whole grains and specific whole-grain species (wheat, rye, and oats) were estimated. Associations between these whole-grain variables and the incidence of colorectal cancer were investigated using Cox proportional hazards models. Intake of whole-grain products was associated with a lower incidence of colorectal cancer per 50-g increment (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89, 0.99), and the same tendency was found for total whole-grain intake (IRR pr. 25-g increment, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.88, 1.01). Intake of whole-grain wheat was associated with a lower incidence of colorectal cancer (IRR for highest versus lowest quartile of intake, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.51, 0.85), but no statistical significant linear trend was observed (p for trend: 0.18). No significant association was found for whole-grain rye or oats.
Whole-grain intake was associated with a lower incidence of colorectal cancer.
PubMed ID
23624874 View in PubMed
Less detail

17 records – page 1 of 2.