Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Connecting the dots: learning from each other in healthcare.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182744
Source
Hosp Q. 2003;6(4):41-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003

The electronic health record: a leap forward in patient safety.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172045
Source
Healthc Pap. 2004;5(3):33-6; discussion 82-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Richard Alvarez
Author Affiliation
Canada Health Infoway, Canada.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2004;5(3):33-6; discussion 82-4
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Quality of Health Care
Registries
Safety
Abstract
In his review of patient safety issues in the Canadian healthcare system, Dr. Matthew Morgan states that "coordinated national EHR initiatives will cost less, save lives and prevent harm when compared to the status quo." Canada Health Infoway is spearheading this initiative in Canada. Infoway's No. 1 guiding principle for investment is that projects undertaken must "enhance the quality of patient care, healthcare services and patient safety." They must also support the development and adoption of pan-Canadian interoperable EHR solutions. Infoway is working in seven major areas to improve electronic access to accurate and timely health information in order to reduce errors, facilitate accurate diagnoses and speed treatment. These areas include the building blocks of the EHR: infostructure, registries, digital imaging systems, and drug and laboratory information systems. Infoway is also developing and expanding telehealth networks to increase the scope of the Canadian healthcare system. Infoway was recently mandated to develop a public health surveillance system for infectious diseases to give healthcare providers a tool for tracking and managing disease outbreaks in the Canadian population. These systems will improve safety, quality, accessibility, cost-efficiency and the sustainability of the healthcare system. Patient safety is a cornerstone of Infoway's activities.
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Pap. 2004;5(3):10-2616278531
PubMed ID
16278533 View in PubMed
Less detail

Planning for Canada's health workforce: looking back, looking forward.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184924
Source
Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):12-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Richard Alvarez
Jennifer Zelmer
Kira Leeb
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institute for Health Information, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):12-26
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Health Manpower - trends
Health Occupations - education
Health planning - trends
Humans
Licensure
National Health Programs - organization & administration - trends
Occupational Health
Patient care team
Population Dynamics
Professional Practice - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice Location
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Abstract
"Are there enough health professionals in Canada, and will they be there when I need them? " Answers to these two seemingly simple questions cover a variety of complex and interrelated factors that are not fully understood, as the report about Canada's Healthcare Providers (CIHI 2001) makes clear. The report appears at a time when Canadian political leaders, healthcare organizations, caregivers and others involved with the healthcare system are looking for creative solutions to the human resources challenges facing the health system. Many of the issues are not new; over the last 50 years they have been raised by various groups and government commissions. But there is a sense of urgency today as options for renewing and sustaining Canada's health system are actively being explored. This essay offers highlights from the report, providing a portrait of what is known (and not known) about the people who work in healthcare across the country. It makes clear that whether there are (or are not) enough healthcare providers is not simply a question of numbers of health professionals. From changes in health and healthcare to shifts in the worklife and practice patterns of professionals, a better understanding of the wide range of factors affecting healthcare providers is essential to further the important debates taking place.
Notes
Comment In: Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):33-9; discussion 76-912811097
Comment In: Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):28-32; discussion 76-912811096
Comment In: Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):40-4; discussion 76-912811098
Comment In: Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):67-70; discussion 76-912811103
Comment In: Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):71-4; discussion 76-912811104
Comment In: Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):61-6; discussion 76-912811102
Comment In: Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):50-5; discussion 76-912813181
Comment In: Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):56-60; discussion 76-912811101
Comment In: Healthc Pap. 2002;3(2):45-9; discussion 76-912811099
PubMed ID
12811095 View in PubMed
Less detail