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Brucellosis outbreak in a Swedish kennel in 2013: determination of genetic markers for source tracing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272646
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2014 Dec 5;174(3-4):523-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-5-2014
Author
Rene Kaden
Joakim Ågren
Viveca Båverud
Gunilla Hallgren
Sevinc Ferrari
Joann Börjesson
Martina Lindberg
Stina Bäckman
Tara Wahab
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2014 Dec 5;174(3-4):523-30
Date
Dec-5-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Base Sequence
Brucella canis - genetics - isolation & purification
Brucellosis - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Dog Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Dogs
Female
Genetic Markers - genetics
Genome, Bacterial - genetics
Humans
Male
Molecular Sequence Data
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction - veterinary
Sequence Analysis, DNA - veterinary
Species Specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Zoonoses
Abstract
Brucellosis is a highly infectious zoonotic disease but rare in Sweden. Nonetheless, an outbreak of canine brucellosis caused by an infected dog imported to Sweden was verified in 2013. In total 25 dogs were tested at least duplicated by the following approaches: real-time PCR for the detection of Brucella canis, a Brucella genus-specific real-time PCR, selective cultivation, and microscopic examination. The whole genome of B. canis strain SVA13 was analysed regarding genetic markers for epidemiological examination. The genome of an intact prophage of Roseobacter was detected in B. canis strain SVA13 with whole genome sequence prophage analysis (WGS-PA). It was shown that the prophage gene content in the American, African and European isolates differs remarkably from the Asian strains. The prophage sequences in Brucella may therefore serve of use as genetic markers in epidemiological investigations. Phage DNA fragments were also detected in clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in the genome of strain SVA13. In addition to the recommendations for genetic markers in Brucella outbreak tracing, our paper reports a validated two-step stand-alone real-time PCR for the detection of B. canis and its first successful use in an outbreak investigation.
PubMed ID
25465667 View in PubMed
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Characterization of Swedish Campylobacter coli clade 2 and clade 3 water isolates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297523
Source
Microbiologyopen. 2018 08; 7(4):e00583
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2018
Author
Anna Nilsson
Astrid Skarp
Cecilia Johansson
René Kaden
Lars Engstrand
Hilpi Rautelin
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Microbiologyopen. 2018 08; 7(4):e00583
Date
08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Campylobacter coli - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Fresh Water - microbiology
Genome, Bacterial
Phenotype
Phylogeny
Sweden
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are important bacterial enteropathogens. Poultry is the best-known reservoir for Campylobacter infection but natural bodies of water have also been shown to be important pathways for transmission. Campylobacter can survive in cold water but most of the studies have focused on C. jejuni only. In this paper, we take a closer look at the biology and water survival strategies of C. coli. Eight C. coli isolates cultivated from raw (incoming) surface water at water plants in Sweden were characterized using whole-genome sequencing and phenotypical assays. Phylogenetic analysis assigned the Swedish water isolates to clades 2 and 3, known to include C. coli of environmental origin. In addition, 53 earlier published sequences of C. coli clade 2 and 3 from environmental waters were included for in silico analyses. Generally, clade 2 isolates had larger genomes, which included a functional tricarballylate utilization locus, while clade 3 isolates contained different genes involved in oxidative stress as well as putative virulence factors. The Swedish water isolates of clade 2 formed large, blurry bacterial colonies on agar, whereas clade 3 colonies were smaller. All Swedish isolates were motile, but clade 3 isolates formed larger motility zones on soft agar, and none of these isolates produced biofilm. Although water survival varied between the analyzed isolates, there were hardly any clade-specific significant differences. Our results highlight the diversity of C. coli in general, and show differences in metabolic capabilities and ways to handle oxidative stress between clade 2 and 3 water isolates.
PubMed ID
29424055 View in PubMed
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Genomic and phenotypic characteristics of Swedish C. jejuni water isolates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287925
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(12):e0189222
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Anna Nilsson
Cecilia Johansson
Astrid Skarp
René Kaden
Lars Engstrand
Hilpi Rautelin
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(12):e0189222
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Campylobacter jejuni - genetics - pathogenicity
Genes, Bacterial
Phenotype
Sweden
Virulence
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis. Major reservoirs are warm-blooded animals, poultry in particular, but Campylobacter can also be transmitted via water. In this paper, we have taken a closer look at the biology and potential virulence of C. jejuni water isolates. Seven C. jejuni isolates from incoming surface water at water plants in Sweden were characterized with whole genome sequencing and phenotypical testing. Multi locus sequence typing analysis revealed that these isolates belonged to groups known to include both common (ST48CC) and uncommon (ST1275CC, ST683, ST793 and ST8853) human pathogens. Further genomic characterization revealed that these isolates had potential for arsenic resistance (due to presence of arsB gene in all isolates), an anaerobic dimethyl sulfoxide oxidoreductase (in three isolates) and lacked the MarR-type transcriptional regulator gene rrpB (in all but one isolate) earlier shown to be involved in better survival under oxidative and aerobic stress. As putative virulence factors were concerned, there were differences between the water isolates in the presence of genes coding for cytolethal distending toxin (cdtABC), Type VI secretion system and sialylated LOS, as well as in biofilm formation. However, all isolates were motile and could adhere to and invade the human HT-29 colon cancer cell line in vitro and induce IL-8 secretion suggesting potential to infect humans. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first study where C. jejuni water isolates have been characterized using whole genome sequencing and phenotypical assays. We found differences and shared traits among the isolates but also potential to infect humans.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29216271 View in PubMed
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