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Advancing paternal age and offspring violent offending: a sibling-comparison study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122731
Source
Dev Psychopathol. 2012 Aug;24(3):739-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Ralf Kuja-Halkola
Yudi Pawitan
Brian M D'Onofrio
Niklas Långström
Paul Lichtenstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, P.O. Box 281, Stockholm 171 77, Sweden. ralf.kuja-halkola@ki.se
Source
Dev Psychopathol. 2012 Aug;24(3):739-53
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - genetics
Crime - psychology
Criminals - psychology
Fathers
Humans
Male
Paternal Age
Registries
Risk
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - genetics
Siblings - psychology
Sweden
Violence - psychology
Abstract
Children born to older fathers are at higher risk to develop severe psychopathology (e.g., schizophrenia and bipolar disorder), possibly because of increased de novo mutations during spermatogenesis with older paternal age. Because severe psychopathology is correlated with antisocial behavior, we examined possible associations between advancing paternal age and offspring violent offending. Interlinked Swedish national registers provided information on fathers' age at childbirth and violent criminal convictions in all offspring born from 1958 to 1979 (N = 2,359,921). We used ever committing a violent crime and number of violent crimes as indices of violent offending. The data included information on multiple levels; we compared differentially exposed siblings in within-family analyses to rigorously test causal influences. In the entire population, advancing paternal age predicted offspring violent crime according to both indices. Congruent with a causal effect, this association remained for rates of violent crime in within-family analyses. However, in within-family analyses, we found no association with ever committing a violent crime, suggesting that factors shared by siblings (genes and environment) confounded this association. Life-course persistent criminality has been proposed to have a partly biological etiology; our results agree with a stronger biological effect (i.e., de novo mutations) on persistent violent offending.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22781852 View in PubMed
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Association between deliberate self-harm and violent criminality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283453
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2017 Jun 01;74(6):615-621
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-01-2017
Author
Hanna Sahlin
Ralf Kuja-Halkola
Johan Bjureberg
Paul Lichtenstein
Yasmina Molero
Mina Rydell
Erik Hedman
Bo Runeson
Jussi Jokinen
Brjánn Ljótsson
Clara Hellner
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2017 Jun 01;74(6):615-621
Date
Jun-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age of Onset
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Crime - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics as Topic
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Individuals who self-harm may have an increased risk of aggression toward others, but this association has been insufficiently investigated. More conclusive evidence may affect assessment, treatment interventions, and clinical guidelines.
To investigate the association between nonfatal self-harm and violent crime.
This population-based longitudinal cohort study, conducted from January 1, 1997, through December 31, 2013, studied all Swedish citizens born between 1982 and 1998 who were 15 years and older (N?=?1?850?252). Individuals who emigrated from Sweden before the age of 15 years (n?=?104?051) or immigrated to Sweden after the age of 13 years (ie,
PubMed ID
28384711 View in PubMed
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Association of height and violent criminality: results from a Swedish total population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260529
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2014 Jun;43(3):835-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Amber L Beckley
Ralf Kuja-Halkola
Lena Lundholm
Niklas Långström
Thomas Frisell
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2014 Jun;43(3):835-42
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Height
Body mass index
Criminals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Intelligence
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Violent criminality is at least moderately heritable, but the mechanisms behind this remain largely unexplained. Height, a highly heritable trait, may be involved but no study has estimated the effect of height on crime while simultaneously accounting for important demographic, biological and other heritable confounders.
We linked nationwide, longitudinal registers for 760 000 men who underwent mandatory military conscription from 1980 through 1992 in Sweden, to assess the association between height and being convicted of a violent crime. We used Cox proportional hazard modelling and controlled for three types of potential confounders: physical characteristics, childhood demographics and general cognitive ability (intelligence).
In unadjusted analyses, height had a moderate negative relationship to violent crime; the shortest of men were twice as likely to be convicted of a violent crime as the tallest. However, when simultaneously controlling for all measured confounders, height was weakly and positively related to violent crime. Intelligence had the individually strongest mitigating effect on the height-crime relationship.
Although shorter stature was associated with increased risk of violent offending, our analyses strongly suggested that this relationship was explained by intelligence and other confounding factors. Hence, it is unlikely that height, a highly heritable physical characteristic, accounts for much of the unexplained heritability of violent criminality.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Epidemiol. 2014 Jun;43(3):639-4425050434
PubMed ID
24453240 View in PubMed
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Association of Perinatal Risk Factors With Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Population-Based Birth Cohort, Sibling Control Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282263
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2016 Nov 01;73(11):1135-1144
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-01-2016
Author
Gustaf Brander
Mina Rydell
Ralf Kuja-Halkola
Lorena Fernández de la Cruz
Paul Lichtenstein
Eva Serlachius
Christian Rück
Catarina Almqvist
Brian M D'Onofrio
Henrik Larsson
David Mataix-Cols
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2016 Nov 01;73(11):1135-1144
Date
Nov-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Apgar score
Birth weight
Breech Presentation
Case-Control Studies
Cesarean Section
Cohort Studies
Epigenesis, Genetic
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature, Diseases - epidemiology - genetics
Male
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Perinatal care
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Siblings
Sweden
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Perinatal complications may increase the risk of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Previous reports were based on small, retrospective, specialist clinic-based studies that were unable to rigorously control for unmeasured environmental and genetic confounding.
To prospectively investigate a wide range of potential perinatal risk factors for OCD, controlling for unmeasured factors shared between siblings in the analyses.
This population-based birth cohort study included all 2?421?284 children from singleton births in Sweden from January 1, 1973, to December 31, 1996, who were followed up through December 31, 2013. From the 1?403?651 families in the cohort, differentially exposed siblings from the 743?885 families with siblings were evaluated; of these, 11?592 families included clusters of full siblings that were discordant for OCD. Analysis of the data was conducted from January, 26, 2015, to September, 5, 2016.
Perinatal data were collected from the Swedish Medical Birth Register and included maternal smoking during pregnancy, labor presentation, obstetric delivery, gestational age (for preterm birth), birth weight, birth weight in relation to gestational age, 5-minute Apgar score, and head circumference.
Previously validated OCD codes (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Health Related Problems, Tenth Revision, code F42) in the Swedish National Patient Register.
Of 2?421?284 individuals included in the cohort, 17?305 persons were diagnosed with OCD. Of these, 7111 were men (41.1%). The mean (SD) age of individuals at first diagnosis of OCD was 23.4 (6.5) years. An increased risk for OCD remained after controlling for shared familial confounders and measured covariates (including sex, year of birth, maternal and paternal age at birth, and parity), for smoking 10 or more cigarettes per day during pregnancy (hazard ratio [HR], 1.27; 95% CI, 1.02-1.58), breech presentation (HR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.06-1.71), delivery by cesarean section (HR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.01-1.34), preterm birth (HR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.07-1.43), birth weight 1501 to 2500 g (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.05-1.62) and 2501 to 3500 g (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01-1.16), being large for gestational age (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.05-1.45), and Apgar distress scores at 5 minutes (HR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.07-2.09). Gestational age and birth weight followed inverse dose-response associations, whereby an increasingly higher risk for OCD was noted in children with a shorter gestational age and lower birth weight. We also observed a dose-response association between the number of perinatal events and increased OCD risk, with HRs ranging from 1.11 (95% CI, 1.07-1.15) for 1 event to 1.51 (95% CI, 1.18-1.94) for 5 or more events.
A range of perinatal risk factors is associated with a higher risk for OCD independent of shared familial confounders, suggesting that perinatal risk factors may be in the causal pathway to OCD.
PubMed ID
27706475 View in PubMed
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Association of Resting Heart Rate and Blood Pressure in Late Adolescence With Subsequent Mental Disorders: A Longitudinal Population Study of More Than 1 Million Men in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282464
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2016 Dec 01;73(12):1268-1275
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2016
Author
Antti Latvala
Ralf Kuja-Halkola
Christian Rück
Brian M D'Onofrio
Tomas Jernberg
Catarina Almqvist
David Mataix-Cols
Henrik Larsson
Paul Lichtenstein
Source
JAMA Psychiatry. 2016 Dec 01;73(12):1268-1275
Date
Dec-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Autonomic Nervous System - physiopathology
Biomarkers
Blood Pressure - physiology
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - physiopathology
Military Personnel
Prodromal Symptoms
Statistics as Topic
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Differences in cardiovascular autonomic activity between individuals with psychiatric disorders and healthy controls have been observed, but whether cardiovascular autonomic abnormalities are associated with subsequent psychiatric disorders is unknown.
To investigate whether differences in cardiac autonomic function as indexed by resting heart rate and blood pressure are associated with psychiatric disorders during the lifetime of men in Sweden.
We conducted a longitudinal register-based study of Swedish men whose resting heart rate (n?=?1?039?443) and blood pressure (n?=?1?555?979) were measured at military conscription at a mean (SD) age of 18.3 (0.6) years during the period from 1969 to 2010, with register-based follow-up data available until the end of 2013. Analyses were performed from November 18, 2015, to June 9, 2016.
Dates of inpatient/outpatient diagnoses of anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, depressive disorders, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and substance use disorders and convictions for violent crimes, between 1973 and 2013, were obtained from nationwide registers. Adjustments were made for height, weight, body mass index, cardiorespiratory fitness, cognitive ability, and socioeconomic covariates.
After adjustment for covariates, Cox regression models with up to 45 years of follow-up data showed that men (mean [SD] age of 18.3 [0.6] years at conscription) with resting heart rates above 82 beats per minute had a 69% (95% CI, 46%-94%) increased risk for obsessive-compulsive disorder, a 21% (95% CI, 11%-33%) increased risk for schizophrenia, and an 18% (95% CI, 13%-22%) increased risk for anxiety disorders compared with men with resting heart rates below 62 beats per minute. Similar associations were observed with systolic/diastolic blood pressure. In contrast, lower resting heart rate and lower systolic blood pressure were associated with substance use disorders and violent criminality.
Our results suggest that for men, differences in heart rate and blood pressure in late adolescence are associated with lifetime major psychiatric disorders, with higher levels associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, and anxiety disorders and lower levels associated with substance use disorders and violent behavior. Differences in autonomic nervous system functioning may predate or represent an early marker of psychiatric disorders.
PubMed ID
27784035 View in PubMed
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Bipolar disorder and its relation to major psychiatric disorders: a family-based study in the Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272133
Source
Bipolar Disord. 2015 Mar;17(2):184-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Jie Song
Sarah E Bergen
Ralf Kuja-Halkola
Henrik Larsson
Mikael Landén
Paul Lichtenstein
Source
Bipolar Disord. 2015 Mar;17(2):184-93
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - genetics
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - genetics
Autism Spectrum Disorder - epidemiology - genetics
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - genetics
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - genetics
Family
Female
Humans
Male
Personality Disorders - epidemiology - genetics
Registries
Risk
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - genetics
Siblings
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - genetics
Sweden - epidemiology
Twins - genetics
Abstract
Bipolar disorder (BPD) shares genetic components with other psychiatric disorders; however, uncertainty remains about where in the psychiatric spectra BPD falls. To understand the etiology of BPD, we studied the familial aggregation of BPD and co-aggregation between BPD and schizophrenia, depression, anxiety disorders, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, drug abuse, personality disorders, and autism spectrum disorders.
A population-based cohort was created by linking several Swedish national registers. A total of 54,723 individuals with BPD were identified among 8,141,033 offspring from 4,149,748 nuclear families. The relative risk of BPD in relatives and the co-occurrence of other psychiatric disorders in patients with BPD and their relatives were compared to those of matched-population controls. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate the heritability and tetrachoric correlation.
The familial risks for relatives of BPD probands were 5.8-7.9 in first-degree relatives, and decreased with genetic distance. Co-occurrence risks for other psychiatric disorders were 9.7-22.9 in individuals with BPD and 1.7-2.8 in full siblings of BPD probands. Heritability for BPD was estimated at 58%. The correlations between BPD and other psychiatric disorders were considerable (0.37-0.62) and primarily due to genetic effects. The correlation with depression was the highest (0.62), and was 0.44 for schizophrenia.
The high familial risks provide evidence that genetic factors play an important role in the etiology of BPD, and the shared genetic determinants suggest pleiotropic effects across different psychiatric disorders. Results also indicate that BPD is in both the mood and psychotic spectra, but possibly more closely related to mood disorders.
PubMed ID
25118125 View in PubMed
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Codevelopment of ADHD and externalizing behavior from childhood to adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270292
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2015 Jun;56(6):640-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Ralf Kuja-Halkola
Paul Lichtenstein
Brian M D'Onofrio
Henrik Larsson
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2015 Jun;56(6):640-7
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology
Child
Comorbidity
Conduct Disorder - epidemiology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) frequently co-occurs with externalizing disorders, but a clear understanding of the etiologic underpinnings is hampered by the limited understanding of the codevelopment of the traits from childhood into early adulthood.
Using a birth cohort of 2600 twins, the Swedish Twin study of Child and Adolescent Development study, assessed at ages 8-9, 13-14, 16-17, and 19-20, we investigated the codevelopment of ADHD and externalizing behavior from childhood to adulthood. The analyses examined ADHD-like and externalizing traits, as rated by twins and their parents using the Attention Problems scale and Externalizing scale of the Child Behavior Checklist, and estimated cross-lagged effects (one trait at one time-point predicting the other at the next). The covariation between the traits were decomposed into stable (effects carried over from the prior time-points) and innovative (new effects for each time-point) sources; each source was further decomposed into additive genetics, shared and nonshared environment.
The analysis suggested that externalizing traits in middle childhood (age 8-9) predicted ADHD-like traits in early adolescence (age 13-14), whereas the reverse association was nonsignificant. In contrast, ADHD-like traits in lateadolescence (age 16-17) predicted externalizing traits in early adulthood (age 19-20). The correlation between ADHD-like and externalizing traits increased over time. At all time-points, innovative sources contributed substantially to maintained comorbidity. Genetic effects explained 67% of the covariation at each time-point; importantly, nearly 50% of these effects were innovative.
This study challenges the belief that ADHD generally precedes externalizing behaviors; rather, change in the etiologic factors across the development is the rule. The effects were due to both new genetic and environmental factors emerging up to young adulthood. Clinicians and researchers needs to consider complex etiologic and developmental models for the comorbidity between ADHD and externalizing behaviors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25303006 View in PubMed
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Cognitive ability and risk for substance misuse in men: genetic and environmental correlations in a longitudinal nation-wide family study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288334
Source
Addiction. 2016 Oct;111(10):1814-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Antti Latvala
Ralf Kuja-Halkola
Brian M D'Onofrio
Henrik Larsson
Paul Lichtenstein
Source
Addiction. 2016 Oct;111(10):1814-22
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cognition Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Gene-Environment Interaction
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Pedigree
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
To investigate the association in males between cognitive ability in late adolescence and subsequent substance misuse-related events, and to study the underlying genetic and environmental correlations.
A population-based longitudinal study with three different family-based designs. Cox proportional hazards models were conducted to investigate the association at the individual level. Bivariate quantitative genetic modelling in (1) full brothers and maternal half-brothers, (2) full brothers reared together and apart and (3) monozygotic and dizygotic twin brothers was used to estimate genetic and environmental correlations.
Register-based study in Sweden.
The full sample included 1 402 333 Swedish men born 1958-91 and conscripted at mean age 18.2 [standard deviation (SD)?=?0.5] years. A total of 1 361 066 men who had no substance misuse events before cognitive assessment at mandatory military conscription were included in the Cox regression models, with a follow-up time of up to 35.6?years.
Cognitive ability was assessed at conscription with the Swedish Enlistment Battery. Substance misuse events included alcohol- and drug-related court convictions, medical treatments and deaths, available from governmental registries.
Lower cognitive ability in late adolescence predicted an increased risk for substance misuse events [hazard ratio (HR) for a 1-stanine unit decrease in cognitive ability: 1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI)?=?1.29-1.30]. The association was somewhat attenuated within clusters of full brothers (HR?=?1.21, 95% CI?=?1.20-1.23). Quantitative genetic analyses indicated that the association was due primarily to genetic influences; the genetic correlations ranged between -0.39 (95% CI?=?-0.45, -0.34) and -0.52 (95% CI -0.55, -0.48) in the three different designs.
Shared genetic influences appear to underlie the association between low cognitive ability and subsequent risk for substance misuse events among Swedish men.
PubMed ID
27106532 View in PubMed
Less detail

Estimating Heritability of Prostate Cancer-Specific Survival Using Population-Based Registers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285070
Source
Prostate. 2017 Jun;77(8):900-907
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Robert Szulkin
Mark S Clements
Patrik K E Magnusson
Fredrik E Wiklund
Ralf Kuja-Halkola
Source
Prostate. 2017 Jun;77(8):900-907
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Disease Progression
Disease Susceptibility - epidemiology
Family
Gene-Environment Interaction
Humans
Incidence
Inheritance Patterns
Likelihood Functions
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatic Neoplasms - genetics - mortality
Registries
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
There is a strong genetic component in prostate cancer development with an estimated heritability of 58%. In addition, recent epidemiological assessments show a familial component in prostate cancer-specific survival, which could be due to either common genetics or environment. In this study we sought to estimate the heritability of prostate cancer-specific survival by studying brothers and father-son pairs in Sweden.
We used linkage records from three Swedish national registers: the Multi-Generation Register, the Cancer Register, and the Cause of Death Register. One thousand seven hundred twenty-eight brother pairs and 6,444 father-son pairs, where both family members were diagnosed with prostate cancer, were followed for prostate cancer mortality. By assuming that (i) brothers on average share 50% of their segregating alleles and 100% environment and (ii) fathers and sons share 50% of their segregating alleles and no environment, we implemented a model including influences of additive genetics (heritability), shared environment and non-shared environment for survival data. A conditional likelihood estimation procedure was developed to fit the model. Data simulation was applied to validate model assumptions.
In a model that adjusted for age at diagnosis and calendar period, the estimated heritability of prostate cancer-specific survival was 0.10 (95% CI?=?0.00-0.20) that was borderline significantly different from zero (P?=?0.057). The shared environment component was not significantly different from zero with a point estimate of 0.00 (95% CI?=?0.00-0.13). Simulation studies and sensitivity analysis revealed that the estimated heritability component was robust, whereas the shared environmental component may be underestimated.
Heritability of prostate cancer-specific survival is considerably lower than for prostate cancer incidence. This supports a hypothesis that susceptibility of disease and progression of disease are separate mechanisms that involve different genes. Further assessment of the genetic basis of prostate cancer-specific survival is warranted. Prostate 77:900-907, 2017. ? 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
PubMed ID
28247425 View in PubMed
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Familial aggregation of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286162
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2017 Mar;58(3):231-239
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Qi Chen
Isabell Brikell
Paul Lichtenstein
Eva Serlachius
Ralf Kuja-Halkola
Sven Sandin
Henrik Larsson
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2017 Mar;58(3):231-239
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Family
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Siblings
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) aggregates in families. To date, the strength, pattern, and characteristics of the familial aggregation have not been thoroughly assessed in a population-based family sample.
In this cohort study, we identified relative pairs of twins, full and half-siblings, and full and half cousins from 1,656,943 unique individuals born in Sweden between 1985 and 2006. The relatives of index persons were followed from their third birthday to 31 December 2009 for ADHD diagnosis. Birth year adjusted hazard ratio (HR), that is, the rate of ADHD in relatives of ADHD-affected index persons compared with the rate of ADHD in relatives of unaffected index persons, was estimated in the different types of relatives using Cox proportional hazards model.
During the follow-up, 31,865 individuals were diagnosed with ADHD (male to female ratio was 3.7). The birth year adjusted HRs were as follows: 70.45 for monozygotic twins; 8.44 for dizygotic twins; 8.27 for full siblings; 2.86 for maternal half-siblings; 2.31 for paternal half-siblings; 2.24 for full cousins; 1.47 for half cousins. Maternal half-siblings had significantly higher HR than in paternal half-siblings. The HR did not seem to be affected by index person's sex. Full siblings of index persons with ADHD diagnosis present at age 18 or older had a higher rate of ADHD (HR: 11.49) than full siblings of index persons with ADHD diagnosis only before age 18 (HR: 4.68).
Familial aggregation of ADHD increases with increasing genetic relatedness. The familial aggregation is driven by not only genetic factors but also a small amount of shared environmental factors. Persistence of ADHD into adulthood indexes stronger familial aggregation of ADHD.
PubMed ID
27545745 View in PubMed
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