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The 2007 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: part 1- blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163301
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):529-38
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
May-15-2007
Author
Raj S Padwal
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Finlay A McAlister
Donald W McKay
Steven Grover
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Ellen Burgess
Peter Bolli
Michael Hill
Jeff Mahon
Martin G Myers
Carl Abbott
Ernest L Schiffrin
George Honos
Karen Mann
Guy Tremblay
Alain Milot
Lyne Cloutier
Arun Chockalingam
Nadia A Khan
Simon W Rabkin
Martin Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta. rpadwal@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):529-38
Date
May-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Blood Pressure Determination
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Canada
Health promotion
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - physiopathology - prevention & control
Patient Education as Topic
Risk factors
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with hypertension.
The diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on the appropriate measurement of blood pressure, the timely assessment of serially elevated readings, the degree of blood pressure elevation, the method of measurement (office, ambulatory, home) and any associated comorbidities. The presence of cardiovascular risk factors and target organ damage should be ascertained to assess global cardiovascular risk, and to determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment required.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2005 to October 2006 with the aid of a medical librarian. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of authors and subgroup members were used to identify additional studies. Content and methodological experts assessed studies using prespecified, standardized evidence-based algorithms. Recommendations were based on evidence from peer-reviewed, full-text articles only.
Recommendations for blood pressure measurement, criteria for hypertension diagnosis and follow-up, assessment of global cardiovascular risk, diagnostic testing, diagnosis of renovascular and endocrine causes of hypertension, home and ambulatory monitoring, and the use of echocardiography in hypertensive individuals are outlined. Key messages in 2007 include continued emphasis on the expedited, accurate diagnosis of hypertension, the importance of assessing the risk of cerebrovascular events as part of global risk assessment, the need for ongoing reassessment of patients with high normal blood pressure, and reviews of recent studies involving laboratory testing and home monitoring.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and were voted on by the 57 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here received at least 70% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 2001 Nov 17;358(9294):1682-611728544
Cites: Clin Sci (Lond). 2001 Dec;101(6):671-911724655
Cites: J Hypertens. 2002 Apr;20(4):579-8111910284
Cites: Stroke. 2002 Jul;33(7):1776-8112105351
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2002 Jun;18(6):604-2412107419
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2002 Jun;18(6):625-4112107420
Cites: Blood Press Monit. 2002 Dec;7(6):293-30012488648
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Dec 14;360(9349):1903-1312493255
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2003 Jun;24(11):987-100312788299
Cites: Hypertension. 2004 Jan;43(1):10-714638619
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):31-4014968141
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):41-5414968142
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Mar 17;291(11):1342-915026401
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Sep 11-17;364(9438):937-5215364185
Cites: Circulation. 1991 Jan;83(1):356-621984895
Cites: JAMA. 1996 May 22-29;275(20):1571-68622248
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1996 Jul 8;156(13):1414-208678709
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1998 Mar 23;158(6):655-629521231
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Dec 1;160(11):1122-3115561992
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):645-5616003448
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):657-7216003449
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2005 Jul 11;165(13):1541-616009871
Cites: Kidney Int. 2006 Jan;69(2):406-1116408134
Cites: J Hypertens. 2006 Apr;24(4):775-8116531808
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Apr 20;354(16):1685-9716537662
Cites: Hypertension. 2006 May;47(5):846-5316567588
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):559-6416755310
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):573-8116755312
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):583-9316755313
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):606-1316755316
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Oct 15;164(8):725-716936069
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Nov 29;362(9398):1776-714654312
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2001 Dec;17(12):1249-6311773936
Cites: Am Heart J. 2000 Feb;139(2 Pt 1):272-8110650300
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2000 Mar 13;160(5):685-9310724055
Cites: Clin Radiol. 2000 May;55(5):346-5310816399
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2000 Sep;16(9):1094-10211021953
Cites: BMJ. 2001 Apr 21;322(7292):977-8011312234
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2001 May;17(5):543-5911381277
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Jul 11;286(2):180-711448281
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 Nov 1;345(18):1291-711794147
Comment In: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):603-417593584
PubMed ID
17534459 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2008 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part 1 - blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156767
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):455-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Raj S Padwal
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Nadia A Khan
Steven Grover
Finlay A McAlister
Donald W McKay
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Ellen Burgess
Peter Bolli
Michael D Hill
Jeff Mahon
Martin G Myers
Carl Abbott
Ernesto L Schiffrin
George Honos
Karen Mann
Guy Tremblay
Alain Milot
Lyne Cloutier
Arun Chockalingam
Simon W Rabkin
Martin Dawes Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Chaim Bell
Kevin D Burns
Marcel Ruzicka
Norman R C Campbell
Marcel Lebel
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. rpadwal@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):455-63
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Canada
Clinical Competence
Diagnosis, Differential
Education, Medical, Continuing - standards
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Program Evaluation - trends
Risk Assessment - methods
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with hypertension.
The diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on appropriate blood pressure measurement, the timely assessment of serially elevated readings, degree of blood pressure elevation, method of measurement (office, ambulatory, home) and associated comorbidities. The presence of cardiovascular risk factors and target organ damage should be ascertained to assess global cardiovascular risk and determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment required.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2006 to October 2007 with the aid of a medical librarian. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of authors and subgroup members were used to identify additional studies. Content and methodological experts assessed studies using prespecified, standardized evidence-based algorithms. Recommendations were based on evidence from peer-reviewed, full-text articles only.
Recommendations for blood pressure measurement, criteria for hypertension diagnosis and follow-up, assessment of global cardiovascular risk, diagnostic testing, diagnosis of renovascular and endocrine causes of hypertension, home and ambulatory monitoring, and the use of echocardiography in hypertensive individuals are outlined. Key messages in 2008 include continued emphasis on the expedited, accurate diagnosis of hypertension, the importance of global risk assessment and the need for ongoing monitoring of hypertensive patients to identify incident type 2 diabetes.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 57 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here received at least 70% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
Cites: Am Heart J. 2000 Feb;139(2 Pt 1):272-8110650300
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2007 Nov 26;167(21):2296-30318039987
Cites: Clin Radiol. 2000 May;55(5):346-5310816399
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2000 Sep;16(9):1094-10211021953
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Jul 11;286(2):180-711448281
Cites: Clin Sci (Lond). 2001 Dec;101(6):671-911724655
Cites: Stroke. 2002 Jul;33(7):1776-8112105351
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Dec 14;360(9349):1903-1312493255
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Apr 5;361(9364):1149-5812686036
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2003 Jun;24(11):987-100312788299
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Nov 29;362(9398):1776-714654312
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2004 Jan;27(1):247-5514693997
Cites: Hypertension. 2004 Jan;43(1):10-714638619
Cites: Hypertension. 2004 May;43(5):963-915037557
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Sep 11-17;364(9438):937-5215364185
Cites: Circulation. 1991 Jan;83(1):356-621984895
Cites: JAMA. 1996 May 22-29;275(20):1571-68622248
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1996 Jul 8;156(13):1414-208678709
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1998 Mar 23;158(6):655-629521231
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2005 Jan 1;95(1):29-3515619390
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):645-5616003448
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):559-6416755310
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):573-8116755312
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):606-1316755316
Cites: Hypertension. 2006 Aug;48(2):219-2416801488
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Oct 12;355(15):1551-6216980380
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2006 Nov 13;166(20):2191-20117101936
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Jan 20;369(9557):201-717240286
Cites: AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2007 Mar;188(3):798-81117312071
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):529-3817534459
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):539-5017534460
Cites: J Hypertens. 2007 Jun;25(6):1311-717563546
Cites: Kidney Int. 2007 Aug;72(3):260-417507905
Cites: Hypertension. 2007 Sep;50(3):467-7317679652
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 Mar 30;342(13):905-1210738048
PubMed ID
18548142 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2009 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part 1--blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151165
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):279-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Raj S Padwal
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Nadia A Khan
Steven Grover
Donald W McKay
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Ellen Burgess
Finlay A McAlister
Peter Bolli
Machael D Hill
Jeff Mahon
Martin G Myers
Carl Abbott
Ernesto L Schiffrin
George Honos
Karen Mann
Guy Tremblay
Alain Milot
Lyne Cloutier
Arun Chockalingam
Simon W Rabkin
Martin Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Chaim Bell
Kevin D Burns
Marcel Ruzicka
Norman R C Campbell
Michel Vallée
Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. rpadwal@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):279-86
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Canada
Clinical Competence
Combined Modality Therapy
Education, Medical, Continuing - standards
Female
Guideline Adherence
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - therapy
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk Management
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with hypertension.
The diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on appropriate blood pressure measurement, the timely assessment of serially elevated readings, the degree of blood pressure elevation, the method of measurement (office, ambulatory, home) and associated comorbidities. The presence of cardiovascular risk factors and target organ damage should be ascertained to assess global cardiovascular risk and determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment required.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2007 to October 2008 with the aid of a medical librarian. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of authors and subgroup members were used to identify additional studies. Content and methodological experts assessed studies using prespecified, standardized evidence-based algorithms. Recommendations were based on evidence from peer-reviewed full-text articles only.
Recommendations for blood pressure measurement, criteria for hypertension diagnosis and follow-up, assessment of global cardiovascular risk, diagnostic testing, diagnosis of renovascular and endocrine causes of hypertension, home and ambulatory monitoring, and the use of echocardiography in hypertensive individuals are outlined. Key messages include continued emphasis on the expedited, accurate diagnosis of hypertension, the importance of global risk assessment and the need for ongoing monitoring of hypertensive patients to identify incident type 2 diabetes.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 57 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations were required to be supported by at least 70% of task force members. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2004 Jan;27(1):247-5514693997
Cites: JAMA. 2008 Jul 9;300(2):197-20818612117
Cites: Hypertension. 2004 May;43(5):963-915037557
Cites: Pediatrics. 2004 Aug;114(2 Suppl 4th Report):555-7615286277
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Sep 11-17;364(9438):937-5215364185
Cites: Circulation. 1991 Jan;83(1):356-621984895
Cites: JAMA. 1996 May 22-29;275(20):1571-68622248
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1996 Jul 8;156(13):1414-208678709
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1998 Mar 23;158(6):655-629521231
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2005 Jan 1;95(1):29-3515619390
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):645-5616003448
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):559-6416755310
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):573-8116755312
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):606-1316755316
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Oct 12;355(15):1551-6216980380
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2006 Nov 13;166(20):2191-20117101936
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Jan 20;369(9557):201-717240286
Cites: AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2007 Mar;188(3):798-81117312071
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):529-3817534459
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):539-5017534460
Cites: J Hypertens. 2007 Jun;25(6):1311-717563546
Cites: Kidney Int. 2007 Aug;72(3):260-417507905
Cites: Hypertension. 2007 Sep;50(3):467-7317679652
Cites: Am Heart J. 2000 Feb;139(2 Pt 1):272-8110650300
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 Mar 30;342(13):905-1210738048
Cites: Clin Radiol. 2000 May;55(5):346-5310816399
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2000 Sep;16(9):1094-10211021953
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Jul 11;286(2):180-711448281
Cites: Clin Sci (Lond). 2001 Dec;101(6):671-911724655
Cites: Stroke. 2002 Jul;33(7):1776-8112105351
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Dec 14;360(9349):1903-1312493255
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Apr 5;361(9364):1149-5812686036
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2003 Jun;24(11):987-100312788299
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Nov 29;362(9398):1776-714654312
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2007 Nov 26;167(21):2296-30318039987
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):455-6318548142
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):465-7518548143
Cites: Hypertension. 2004 Jan;43(1):10-714638619
PubMed ID
19417858 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2010 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: part I - blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143445
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 May;26(5):241-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Robert R Quinn
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Raj S Padwal
Martin G Myers
Lyne Cloutier
Peter Bolli
Donald W McKay
Nadia A Khan
Michael D Hill
Jeff Mahon
Daniel G Hackam
Steven Grover
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Ellen Burgess
Finlay A McAlister
Maxime Lamarre-Cliche
Donna McLean
Ernesto L Schiffrin
George Honos
Karen Mann
Guy Tremblay
Alain Milot
Arun Chockalingam
Simon W Rabkin
Martin Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Kevin D Burns
Marcel Ruzicka
Norman R C Campbell
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, Alberta. rob.quinn@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 May;26(5):241-8
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - standards
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Quality of Health Care
Risk assessment
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with hypertension.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2008 to October 2009 with the aid of a medical librarian. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of authors and subgroup members were used to identify additional studies. Content and methodological experts assessed studies using prespecified, standardized evidence-based algorithms. Recommendations were based on evidence from peer-reviewed full-text articles only.
Recommendations for blood pressure measurement, criteria for hypertension diagnosis and follow-up, assessment of global cardiovascular risk, diagnostic testing, diagnosis of renovascular and endocrine causes of hypertension, home and ambulatory monitoring, and the use of echocardiography in hypertensive individuals are outlined. Changes to the recommendations for 2010 relate to automated office blood pressure measurements. Automated office blood pressure measurements can be used in the assessment of office blood pressure. When used under proper conditions, an automated office systolic blood pressure of 135 mmHg or higher or diastolic blood pressure of 85 mmHg or higher should be considered analogous to a mean awake ambulatory systolic blood pressure of 135 mmHg or higher and diastolic blood pressure of 85 mmHg or higher, respectively.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 63 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. To be approved, all recommendations were required to be supported by at least 70% of task force members. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
Cites: Pediatrics. 2004 Aug;114(2 Suppl 4th Report):555-7615286277
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):529-3817534459
Cites: Circulation. 1991 Jan;83(1):356-621984895
Cites: JAMA. 1996 May 22-29;275(20):1571-68622248
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1996 Jul 8;156(13):1414-208678709
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1998 Mar 23;158(6):655-629521231
Cites: BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2005;5(1):1815985180
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):645-5616003448
Cites: Blood Press Monit. 2005 Oct;10(5):257-6216205444
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):539-5017534460
Cites: J Hum Hypertens. 2007 Jul;21(7):588-9017377600
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2007 Nov 26;167(21):2296-30318039987
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2008 Mar;21(3):280-318219304
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):455-6318548142
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):465-7518548143
Cites: JAMA. 2008 Jul 9;300(2):197-20818612117
Cites: Blood Press Monit. 2008 Oct;13(5):299-30318799957
Cites: Int J Clin Pract. 2008 Oct;62(10):1484-9818691228
Cites: J Hypertens. 2009 Feb;27(2):280-619155785
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):279-8619417858
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):287-9819417859
Cites: Blood Press Monit. 2009 Jun;14(3):108-1119417634
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Sep 29;54(14):1209-2719778661
Cites: Am Heart J. 2000 Feb;139(2 Pt 1):272-8110650300
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2000 Sep;16(9):1094-10211021953
Cites: Blood Press Monit. 2001 Apr;6(2):107-1011433132
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Jul 11;286(2):180-711448281
Cites: Blood Press Monit. 2001 Jun;6(3):161-511518840
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Dec 14;360(9349):1903-1312493255
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2003 Jun;24(11):987-100312788299
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Nov 29;362(9398):1776-714654312
Cites: Hypertension. 2004 Jan;43(1):10-714638619
Cites: Blood Press Monit. 2006 Apr;11(2):59-6216534406
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):559-6416755310
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):573-8116755312
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):606-1316755316
Cites: J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2007 Apr;9(4):267-7017396069
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Sep 11-17;364(9438):937-5215364185
PubMed ID
20485688 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2011 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, and therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132607
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jul-Aug;27(4):415-433.e1-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
Doreen M Rabi
Stella S Daskalopoulou
Raj S Padwal
Nadia A Khan
Steven A Grover
Daniel G Hackam
Martin G Myers
Donald W McKay
Robert R Quinn
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Lyne Cloutier
Peter Bolli
Michael D Hill
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Ellen Burgess
Maxime Lamarre-Cliché
Donna McLean
Ernesto L Schiffrin
George Honos
Karen Mann
Guy Tremblay
Alain Milot
Arun Chockalingam
Simon W Rabkin
Martin Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Kevin D Burns
Marcel Ruzicka
Norman R C Campbell
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Tavis S Campbell
M Patrice Lindsay
Robert J Herman
Pierre Larochelle
Ross D Feldman
J Malcolm O Arnold
Gordon W Moe
Jonathan G Howlett
Luc Trudeau
Simon L Bacon
Robert J Petrella
Richard Lewanczuk
James A Stone
Denis Drouin
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Mukul Sharma
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George K Dresser
S George Carruthers
George Pylypchuk
Richard E Gilbert
Lawrence A Leiter
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Vincent Woo
Philip A McFarlane
Robert A Hegele
Luc Poirier
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. doreen.rabi@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jul-Aug;27(4):415-433.e1-2
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination
Canada
Health education
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy
Risk assessment
Abstract
We updated the evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in adults for 2011. The major guideline changes this year are: (1) a recommendation was made for using comparative risk analogies when communicating a patient's cardiovascular risk; (2) diagnostic testing issues for renal artery stenosis were discussed; (3) recommendations were added for the management of hypertension during the acute phase of stroke; (4) people with hypertension and diabetes are now considered high risk for cardiovascular events if they have elevated urinary albumin excretion, overt kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, or the presence of other cardiovascular risk factors; (5) the combination of an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor and a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker (CCB) is preferred over the combination of an ACE inhibitor and a thiazide diuretic in persons with diabetes and hypertension; and (6) a recommendation was made to coordinate with pharmacists to improve antihypertensive medication adherence. We also discussed the recent analyses that examined the association between angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) and cancer.
PubMed ID
21801975 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2012 Canadian hypertension education program recommendations for the management of hypertension: blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, and therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124290
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2012 May;28(3):270-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Stella S Daskalopoulou
Nadia A Khan
Robert R Quinn
Marcel Ruzicka
Donald W McKay
Daniel G Hackam
Simon W Rabkin
Doreen M Rabi
Richard E Gilbert
Raj S Padwal
Martin Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Tavis S Campbell
Lyne Cloutier
Steven Grover
George Honos
Robert J Herman
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Peter Bolli
Thomas Wilson
Ross D Feldman
M Patrice Lindsay
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Michael D Hill
Mark Gelfer
Kevin D Burns
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Donna McLean
J Malcolm O Arnold
Gordon W Moe
Jonathan G Howlett
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Pierre Larochelle
Lawrence A Leiter
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Vincent Woo
Janusz Kaczorowski
Luc Trudeau
Simon L Bacon
Robert J Petrella
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Denis Drouin
Maxime Lamarre-Cliché
Marshall Godwin
Guy Tremblay
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
S George Carruthers
George Pylypchuk
Ellen Burgess
Richard Lewanczuk
George K Dresser
Brian Penner
Robert A Hegele
Philip A McFarlane
Mukul Sharma
Norman R C Campbell
Debra Reid
Luc Poirier
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, Canada. stella.daskalopoulou@mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2012 May;28(3):270-87
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination - methods
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Education, Medical, Continuing - standards
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Female
Health Education - standards
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We updated the evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in adults for 2012. The new recommendations are: (1) use of home blood pressure monitoring to confirm a diagnosis of white coat syndrome; (2) mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists may be used in selected patients with hypertension and systolic heart failure; (3) a history of atrial fibrillation in patients with hypertension should not be a factor in deciding to prescribe an angiotensin-receptor blocker for the treatment of hypertension; and (4) the blood pressure target for patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease has now been changed to
PubMed ID
22595447 View in PubMed
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The 2013 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, prevention, and treatment of hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115112
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 May;29(5):528-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Daniel G Hackam
Robert R Quinn
Pietro Ravani
Doreen M Rabi
Kaberi Dasgupta
Stella S Daskalopoulou
Nadia A Khan
Robert J Herman
Simon L Bacon
Lyne Cloutier
Martin Dawes
Simon W Rabkin
Richard E Gilbert
Marcel Ruzicka
Donald W McKay
Tavis S Campbell
Steven Grover
George Honos
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Peter Bolli
Thomas W Wilson
Ross D Feldman
Patrice Lindsay
Michael D Hill
Mark Gelfer
Kevin D Burns
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Donna McLean
J Malcolm O Arnold
Gordon W Moe
Jonathan G Howlett
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Pierre Larochelle
Lawrence A Leiter
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Vincent Woo
Janusz Kaczorowski
Luc Trudeau
Robert J Petrella
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Denis Drouin
Kim L Lavoie
Maxime Lamarre-Cliche
Marshall Godwin
Guy Tremblay
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
S George Carruthers
George B Pylypchuk
Ellen Burgess
Richard Lewanczuk
George K Dresser
S Brian Penner
Robert A Hegele
Philip A McFarlane
Mukul Sharma
Debra J Reid
Sheldon W Tobe
Luc Poirier
Raj S Padwal
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medicine, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. dhackam@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 May;29(5):528-42
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - physiology
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Determination
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Exercise - physiology
Health education
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy
Risk assessment
Abstract
We updated the evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in adults for 2013. This year's update includes 2 new recommendations. First, among nonhypertensive or stage 1 hypertensive individuals, the use of resistance or weight training exercise does not adversely influence blood pressure (BP) (Grade D). Thus, such patients need not avoid this type of exercise for fear of increasing BP. Second, and separately, for very elderly patients with isolated systolic hypertension (age 80 years or older), the target for systolic BP should be
PubMed ID
23541660 View in PubMed
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The 2014 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, prevention, and treatment of hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104360
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 May;30(5):485-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Kaberi Dasgupta
Robert R Quinn
Kelly B Zarnke
Doreen M Rabi
Pietro Ravani
Stella S Daskalopoulou
Simon W Rabkin
Luc Trudeau
Ross D Feldman
Lyne Cloutier
Ally Prebtani
Robert J Herman
Simon L Bacon
Richard E Gilbert
Marcel Ruzicka
Donald W McKay
Tavis S Campbell
Steven Grover
George Honos
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Peter Bolli
Thomas W Wilson
Patrice Lindsay
Michael D Hill
Shelagh B Coutts
Gord Gubitz
Mark Gelfer
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Donna McLean
J Malcolm O Arnold
Gordon W Moe
Jonathan G Howlett
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Pierre Larochelle
Lawrence A Leiter
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Vincent Woo
Janusz Kaczorowski
Kevin D Burns
Robert J Petrella
Swapnil Hiremath
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Denis Drouin
Kim L Lavoie
Maxime Lamarre-Cliche
Guy Tremblay
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
S George Carruthers
George B Pylypchuk
Ellen Burgess
Richard Lewanczuk
George K Dresser
S Brian Penner
Robert A Hegele
Philip A McFarlane
Milan Khara
Andrew Pipe
Paul Oh
Peter Selby
Mukul Sharma
Debra J Reid
Sheldon W Tobe
Raj S Padwal
Luc Poirier
Author Affiliation
Divisions of General Internal Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology and Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, McGill University, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Québec, Canada. Electronic address: kaberi.dasgupta@mcgill.ca.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 May;30(5):485-501
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Canada
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - prevention & control
Life Style
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prognosis
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Herein, updated evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in Canadian adults are detailed. For 2014, 3 existing recommendations were modified and 2 new recommendations were added. The following recommendations were modified: (1) the recommended sodium intake threshold was changed from = 1500 mg (3.75 g of salt) to approximately 2000 mg (5 g of salt) per day; (2) a pharmacotherapy treatment initiation systolic blood pressure threshold of = 160 mm Hg was added in very elderly (age = 80 years) patients who do not have diabetes or target organ damage (systolic blood pressure target in this population remains at
PubMed ID
24786438 View in PubMed
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The Alberta population-based prospective evaluation of the quality of life outcomes and economic impact of bariatric surgery (APPLES) study: background, design and rationale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140191
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2010;10:284
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Raj S Padwal
Sumit R Majumdar
Scott Klarenbach
Dan W Birch
Shahzeer Karmali
Linda McCargar
Konrad Fassbender
Arya M Sharma
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. rpadwal@ualberta.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2010;10:284
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Alberta
Bariatric Surgery - economics - methods - psychology
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Cost of Illness
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity, Morbid - diagnosis - surgery
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Patient Selection
Postoperative Care - methods
Postoperative Complications - physiopathology
Preoperative Care - methods
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Risk assessment
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Waiting Lists
Weight Loss
Abstract
Extreme obesity affects nearly 8% of Canadians, and is debilitating, costly and ultimately lethal. Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment available; is associated with reductions in morbidity/mortality, improvements in quality of life; and appears cost-effective. However, current demand for surgery in Canada outstrips capacity by at least 1000-fold, causing exponential increases in already protracted, multi-year wait-times. The objectives and hypotheses of this study were as follows: 1. To serially assess the clinical, economic and humanistic outcomes in patients wait-listed for bariatric care over a 2-year period. We hypothesize deterioration in these outcomes over time; 2. To determine the clinical effectiveness and changes in quality of life associated with modern bariatric procedures compared with medically treated and wait-listed controls over 2 years. We hypothesize that surgery will markedly reduce weight, decrease the need for unplanned medical care, and increase quality of life; 3. To conduct a 3-year (1 year retrospective and 2 year prospective) economic assessment of bariatric surgery compared to medical and wait-listed controls from the societal, public payor, and health-care payor perspectives. We hypothesize that lower indirect, out of pocket and productivity costs will offset increased direct health-care costs resulting in lower total costs for bariatric surgery.
Population-based prospective cohort study of 500 consecutive, consenting adults, including 150 surgically treated patients, 200 medically treated patients and 150 wait-listed patients. Subjects will be enrolled from the Edmonton Weight Wise Regional Obesity Program (Edmonton, Alberta, Canada), with prospective bi-annual follow-up for 2 years. Mixed methods data collection, linking primary data to provincial administrative databases will be employed. Major outcomes include generic, obesity-specific and preference-based quality of life assessment, patient satisfaction, patient utilities, anthropometric indices, cardiovascular risk factors, health care utilization and direct and indirect costs.
The results will identify the spectrum of potential risks associated with protracted wait times for bariatric care and will quantify the economic, humanistic and clinical impact of surgery from the Canadian perspective. Such information is urgently needed by health-service providers and policy makers to better allocate use of finite resources. Furthermore, our findings should be widely-applicable to other publically-funded jurisdictions providing similar care to the extremely obese.
Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00850356.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20932316 View in PubMed
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Association between direct measures of body composition and prognostic factors in chronic heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142495
Source
Mayo Clin Proc. 2010 Jul;85(7):609-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Antigone Oreopoulos
Justin A Ezekowitz
Finlay A McAlister
Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh
Gregg C Fonarow
Colleen M Norris
Jeffery A Johnson
Raj S Padwal
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Mayo Clin Proc. 2010 Jul;85(7):609-17
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - methods
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Bias (epidemiology)
Biological Markers - blood
Body Composition
Body mass index
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Hand Strength
Heart Failure - blood - etiology - mortality
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood
Nutritional Status
Obesity - classification - complications - diagnosis
Peptide Fragments - blood
Prealbumin - metabolism
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Abstract
To explore the covariate-adjusted associations between body composition (percent body fat and lean body mass) and prognostic factors for mortality in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) (nutritional status, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide [NT-proBNP], quality of life, exercise capacity, and C-reactive protein).
Between June 2008 and July 2009, we directly measured body composition using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in 140 patients with systolic and/or diastolic heart failure. We compared body composition and CHF prognostic factors across body fat reference ranges and body mass index (BMI) categories. Multiple linear regression models were created to examine the independent associations between body composition and CHF prognostic factors; we contrasted these with models that used BMI.
Use of BMI misclassified body fat status in 51 patients (41%). Body mass index was correlated with both lean body mass (r=0.72) and percent body fat (r=0.67). Lean body mass significantly increased with increasing BMI but not with percent body fat. Body mass index was significantly associated with lower NT-proBNP and lower exercise capacity. In contrast, higher percent body fat was associated with a higher serum prealbumin level, lower exercise capacity, and increased C-reactive protein level; lean body mass was inversely associated with NT-proBNP and positively associated with hand-grip strength.
When BMI is divided into fat and lean mass components, a higher lean body mass and/or lower fat mass is independently associated with factors that are prognostically advantageous in CHF. Body mass index may not be a good indicator of adiposity and may in fact be a better surrogate for lean body mass in this population.
Notes
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Comment In: Mayo Clin Proc. 2010 Jul;85(7):605-820592168
Comment In: Mayo Clin Proc. 2011 Jun;86(6):584; author reply 584-521628621
PubMed ID
20592169 View in PubMed
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