Skip header and navigation

Refine By

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Association between blood pressure and survival over 9 years in a general population aged 85 and older.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168803
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2006 Jun;54(6):912-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Sari Rastas
Tuula Pirttilä
Petteri Viramo
Auli Verkkoniemi
Pirjo Halonen
Kati Juva
Leena Niinistö
Kimmo Mattila
Esko Länsimies
Raimo Sulkava
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Lohja Hospital, Lohja, Finland.
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2006 Jun;54(6):912-8
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Survival Rate - trends
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To investigate the association between blood pressure and mortality in people aged 85 and older.
Population-based prospective study with 9-year follow-up.
Department of Neuroscience and Neurology and Department of Public Health and General Practice, University of Kuopio, and Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Helsinki University Hospital.
Of all 601 people living in the city of Vantaa born before April 1, 1906, whether living at home or in institutions and alive on April 1, 1991, 521 were clinically examined and underwent blood pressure measurement.
Blood pressure was measured using a standardized method in the right arm of the subject after resting for at least 5 minutes. Information on medical history for each participant was verified from a computerized database containing all primary care health records. Death certificates were obtained from the National Register; the collection of death certificates was complete.
After adjusting for age, sex, functional status, and coexisting diseases (earlier-diagnosed myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, dementia, cancer, stroke, or hypertension), low systolic blood pressure (BP) was associated with risk of death.
Low systolic BP may be partially related to poor general health and poor vitality, but the very old may represent a select group of individuals, and the use of BP-lowering medications needs to be evaluated in this group.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2007 Jan;55(1):136-7; author reply 13717233706
PubMed ID
16776785 View in PubMed
Less detail

The effects of medication assessment on psychotropic drug use in the community-dwelling elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140866
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2011 Apr;23(3):473-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Maria Rikala
Maarit Jaana Korhonen
Raimo Sulkava
Sirpa Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. maria.rikala@uef.fi
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2011 Apr;23(3):473-84
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged - statistics & numerical data
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inappropriate Prescribing - statistics & numerical data
Interviews as Topic
Male
Psychotropic Drugs - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Questionnaires
Abstract
The study evaluated the effects of an annual medication assessment conducted as part of a Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) on the prevalence of psychotropic drug use in community-dwelling elderly people.
Randomly selected persons (n = 1000) aged =75 years living in the city of Kuopio, Finland were randomized to intervention and control groups. The intervention group underwent an annual (2004-2006) medication assessment as part of a CGA by physicians. Data on drug use were gathered by interviews at baseline (2004) and in three following years (2005-2007). Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were applied to explore whether the prevalence of psychotropic drug use differed between the community-dwelling participants of the intervention (n = 361) and control groups (n = 339) over time.
At baseline, nearly 40% of the participants used psychotropic drugs in each group. In the intervention group, the study physicians implemented 126 psychotropic drug-related changes, 39% of which were persistent after one year. The prevalence of use of psychotropic drugs, antipsychotics and anxiolytic/hypnotics did not differ between the groups over time. The prevalence of antidepressant use remained constant in the intervention group, but increased in the control group (p-value for interaction = 0.039). The prevalence of concomitant use of psychotropic drugs decreased non-significantly in the intervention group, but increased in the control group (p-value for interaction = 0.009).
Conducting an annual medication assessment outside the usual primary health care system does not appear to reduce the prevalence of psychotropic drug use in community-dwelling elderly people. However, it may prevent concomitant use of psychotropic drugs.
PubMed ID
20836913 View in PubMed
Less detail

The non-use of hearing aids in people aged 75 years and over in the city of Kuopio in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180198
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2005 Mar;262(3):165-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Taina A Lupsakko
Hannu J Kautiainen
Raimo Sulkava
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatrics, Social and Welfare Health Center of Aanekoski, Terveyskatu 10, 44100 Aanekoski, Finland. taina.lupsakko@fimnet.fi
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2005 Mar;262(3):165-9
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition
Counseling
Demography
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing Aids - utilization
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Presbycusis - epidemiology - therapy
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Treatment Refusal - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic conditions affecting the health of the aged. It is typically medically non-treatable, and hearing aid (HA) use remains the treatment of choice. However, only 15-30% of older adults with hearing impairment possess an HA. Many of them never use it. The purpose of our study was to investigate the use of provided HAs and reasons for the non-use of HAs. This population-based survey was set in the city of Kuopio in eastern Finland. A total of 601 people aged 75 years or older participated in this study. A geriatrician and a trained nurse examined the subjects. Their functional and cognitive capacity was evaluated. A questionnaire about participants' socioeconomic characteristics and the use of HAs were included in the study protocol. The subjects who had an HA were assigned to three groups on the basis of HA use: full-time users, part-time users and non-users. Inquiries were made about the subjective reasons for the non-use of HAs. An HA had been prescribed earlier to 16.6% of the study group. Fourteen percent of the females and 23% of the males had been provided with an HA. The HA owners were older than persons who had not been provided with an HA. Twenty-five percent of the HA owners were non-users, and 55% were full-time users. A decline in cognitive or functional capacity and low income explained the non-use of HAs. The most common subjective reasons for the non-use of HAs were that the use did not help at all (10/24), the HA was broken (4/24) or it was too complicated to use (5/24). The non-use of HAs is still common among the aged. Elderly people who have been provided with an HA and who have a cognitive or functional decline are at risk to be a non-user of an HA. Therefore, they need special attention in counseling.
PubMed ID
15133689 View in PubMed
Less detail

Self-reported sleep duration and cognitive functioning in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148705
Source
J Sleep Res. 2009 Dec;18(4):436-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Erkki Kronholm
Mikael Sallinen
Timo Suutama
Raimo Sulkava
Pertti Era
Timo Partonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Turku, Finland. erkki.kronholm@thl.fi
Source
J Sleep Res. 2009 Dec;18(4):436-46
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disorders of Excessive Somnolence - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Fatigue - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Judgment
Male
Memory Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Self Disclosure
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sleep Deprivation - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
This study investigated the relationship between self-reported sleep factors (sleep duration, insomnia, use of sleeping medicine, probable sleep apnoea and feelings of fatigue and tiredness) with cognitive functioning in 5177 people aged 30 years or older from a cross-sectional representative sample of the adult population in Finland (The Finnish Health 2000 Survey). Previous studies have indicated a U-shaped association between increased health risks and sleep duration; we hypothesized a U-shaped association between sleep duration and cognitive functioning. Objective cognitive functioning was assessed with tasks derived from the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease test battery (verbal fluency, encoding and retaining verbal material). Subjective cognitive functioning and sleep-related factors were assessed with questionnaires. Health status was assessed during a health interview. Depressive and alcohol use disorders were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Medication was recorded during the health examination. Short and long sleep duration, tiredness and fatigue were found to be associated with both objectively assessed and self-reported decreased cognitive functioning. The association was stronger between sleep factors and subjective cognitive function than with objective cognitive tests. These data suggest that self-reported habitual short and long sleep duration reflect both realization of homeostatic sleep need and symptom formation in the context of the individual's health status.
Notes
Comment In: J Sleep Res. 2009 Dec;18(4):385-619941591
PubMed ID
19732318 View in PubMed
Less detail

Spouse caregivers' perceptions of influence of dementia on marriage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189510
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2002 Mar;14(1):47-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Ulla Eloniemi-Sulkava
Irma-Leena Notkola
Kaija Hämäläinen
Terhi Rahkonen
Petteri Viramo
Maija Hentinen
Sirkka-Liisa Kivelä
Raimo Sulkava
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, University of Kuopio, Finland. ulla.eloniemi@uku.fi
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2002 Mar;14(1):47-58
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - psychology
Cost of Illness
Dementia - psychology
Family Relations
Female
Finland
Happiness
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Marriage - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
To investigate what kind of changes spouse caregivers of demented patients experience after the onset of dementia (a) in the general atmosphere, happiness, and relations of marriage and (b) in the sexual side of marriage.
Semistructured telephone interviews of spouse caregivers of demented patients.
Community-living demented patients and their spouse caregivers in eastern Finland.
The spouse caregivers of 42 demented patients recruited from a previous intervention study.
The questionnaire covered different areas of marriage from the time before and after the onset of dementia.
A statistically significant decline had occurred in extent of happiness (p = .012), in equal relations (p = .001), and in patients' expressions of sexual needs (p
PubMed ID
12094907 View in PubMed
Less detail