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Senile systemic amyloidosis, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and dementia in a very old Finnish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166902
Source
Amyloid. 2006 Sep;13(3):164-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Maarit Tanskanen
Sari Kiuru-Enari
Pentti Tienari
Tuomo Polvikoski
Auli Verkkoniemi
Sari Rastas
Raimo Sulkava
Anders Paetau
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. maarit.tanskanen@helsinki.fi
Source
Amyloid. 2006 Sep;13(3):164-9
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Amyloidosis - epidemiology - pathology - physiopathology
Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy - epidemiology - pathology - physiopathology
Dementia - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Abstract
Senile systemic amyloidosis (SSA) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) are amyloid disorders, which typically manifest with old age. The aim of our study was to examine the possible association of these disorders in very old Finns. We performed a prospective, population-based post mortem study and used histological and immunohistochemical staining methods to verify the presence of these types of amyloid. All 63 subjects (59% of the 107 individuals 95 years of age or more, who died during the 10-year follow-up study), 53 women and 10 men), had been neurologically examined. The prevalence of SSA and its association with CAA, dementia, and neuropathologically verified AD was analyzed. Overall SSA occurred in 23 (37%) and CAA in 28 (44%) of the 63 subjects. At clinical examination 41 individuals (65%) were demented; 24 (38%) had Alzheimer's disease. SSA showed no association with the presence of CAA (P = 0.45), clinical dementia (P = 0.09), or Alzheimer's disease (P = 0.21), or sex (P = 0.53). Our prospective population based study shows that SSA and CAA are frequent in very old Finns, but they do not associate.
PubMed ID
17062383 View in PubMed
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Associations of instrumental activities of daily living and handgrip strength with oral self-care among home-dwelling elderly 75+.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128053
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e135-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Kaija Komulainen
Pekka Ylöstalo
Anna-Maija Syrjälä
Piia Ruoppi
Matti Knuuttila
Raimo Sulkava
Sirpa Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, Unit of Clinical Pharmacology and Geriatric Pharmacotherapy, School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. kaija.komulainen@uef.fi
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e135-42
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Plaque Index
Dentition
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Independent living
Male
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Toothpastes - therapeutic use
Xerostomia - classification
Abstract
To study the associations of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and the handgrip strength with oral self-care among dentate home-dwelling elderly people in Finland.
The study analysed data for 168 dentate participants (mean age 80.6 years) in the population-based Geriatric Multidisciplinary Strategy for Good Care of the Elderly (GeMS) study. Each participant received a clinical oral examination and structured interview in 2004-2005. Functional status was assessed using the IADL scale and handgrip strength was measured using handheld dynamometry.
Study participants with high IADL (scores 7-8) had odds ratios (ORs) for brushing their teeth at least twice a day of 2.7 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.1-6.8], for using toothpaste at least twice a day of 2.0 (CI 0.8-5.2) and for having good oral hygiene of 2.8 (CI 1.0-8.3) when compared with participants with low IADL (scores =6). Participants in the upper tertiles of the handgrip strength had ORs for brushing the teeth at least twice a day of 0.9 (CI 0.4-1.9), for using the toothpaste at least twice a day of 0.9 (CI 0.4-1.8) and for good oral hygiene of 1.1 (CI 0.5-2.4) in comparison with the study subjects in the lowest tertile of handgrip strength.
The results of this study suggest that the functional status, measured by means of the IADL scale, but not handgrip strength, is an important determinant of oral self-care among the home-dwelling elderly.
PubMed ID
22239745 View in PubMed
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The non-use of hearing aids in people aged 75 years and over in the city of Kuopio in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180198
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2005 Mar;262(3):165-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Taina A Lupsakko
Hannu J Kautiainen
Raimo Sulkava
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatrics, Social and Welfare Health Center of Aanekoski, Terveyskatu 10, 44100 Aanekoski, Finland. taina.lupsakko@fimnet.fi
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2005 Mar;262(3):165-9
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition
Counseling
Demography
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing Aids - utilization
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Presbycusis - epidemiology - therapy
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Treatment Refusal - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic conditions affecting the health of the aged. It is typically medically non-treatable, and hearing aid (HA) use remains the treatment of choice. However, only 15-30% of older adults with hearing impairment possess an HA. Many of them never use it. The purpose of our study was to investigate the use of provided HAs and reasons for the non-use of HAs. This population-based survey was set in the city of Kuopio in eastern Finland. A total of 601 people aged 75 years or older participated in this study. A geriatrician and a trained nurse examined the subjects. Their functional and cognitive capacity was evaluated. A questionnaire about participants' socioeconomic characteristics and the use of HAs were included in the study protocol. The subjects who had an HA were assigned to three groups on the basis of HA use: full-time users, part-time users and non-users. Inquiries were made about the subjective reasons for the non-use of HAs. An HA had been prescribed earlier to 16.6% of the study group. Fourteen percent of the females and 23% of the males had been provided with an HA. The HA owners were older than persons who had not been provided with an HA. Twenty-five percent of the HA owners were non-users, and 55% were full-time users. A decline in cognitive or functional capacity and low income explained the non-use of HAs. The most common subjective reasons for the non-use of HAs were that the use did not help at all (10/24), the HA was broken (4/24) or it was too complicated to use (5/24). The non-use of HAs is still common among the aged. Elderly people who have been provided with an HA and who have a cognitive or functional decline are at risk to be a non-user of an HA. Therefore, they need special attention in counseling.
PubMed ID
15133689 View in PubMed
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Dementia and oral health among subjects aged 75 years or older.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96464
Source
Gerodontology. 2010 Jun 30;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-2010
Author
Anna-Maija Hannele Syrjälä
Pekka Ylöstalo
Piia Ruoppi
Kaija Komulainen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Raimo Sulkava
Matti Knuuttila
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Gerodontology. 2010 Jun 30;
Date
Jun-30-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Gerodontology 2010; Dementia and oral health among subjects aged 75 years or older Objective: To study the association between diagnosed dementia and oral health, focusing on the type of dementia, among an elderly population aged 75 years or older. Background: Elderly people with dementia are at risk from oral diseases, but to date, only a few studies have analysed the association between type of dementia and oral health, and their results are inconclusive. Materials and methods: This cross-sectional study is based on the Geriatric multi-disciplinary strategy (Gems) study that included 76 demented and 278 non-demented subjects. The data were collected by means of an interview and an oral clinical examination. The type of dementia was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria. Poisson's and logistic regression models were used to determine relative risks (RR), odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence limits (CI). Results: Our results showed that patients with Alzheimer's disease and those with other types of dementia had an increased likelihood of having carious teeth, teeth with deep periodontal pockets, and poor oral and denture hygiene, compared with non-demented persons. The results showed that the type of dementia does not seem to be an essential determinant of oral health. Conclusions: Among the elderly aged 75 years or older, patients with Alzheimer's disease or other types of dementia are at increased risk of poor oral health and poor oral hygiene.
PubMed ID
20604811 View in PubMed
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Depressive symptoms and cardiovascular burden-related mortality among the aged.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258945
Source
Eur J Clin Invest. 2014 May;44(5):486-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Matti Hiltunen
Tuomo Nieminen
Raimo Kettunen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Raimo Sulkava
Olli Vuolteenaho
Tuomas Kerola
Source
Eur J Clin Invest. 2014 May;44(5):486-92
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - mortality - psychology
Cost of Illness
Depression - blood - mortality
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - metabolism
Abstract
Depressive symptoms have been linked to increased cardiovascular mortality among the elderly. This study was aimed to test the independent and additive predictive value of depressive symptoms and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), a marker of direct cardiovascular stress and a strong predictor of mortality, together with traditional cardiovascular risk markers on total and cardiovascular mortalities in a general elderly population.
A total of 508 subjects aged 75 or older participated in the study. The prognostic capacity of depressive symptoms and BNP in regard to total and cardiovascular mortalities was assessed with Cox regression analyses. Depressive symptoms were handled as a dichotomous variable based on the Zung self-rated depression scale score with a cut-off point of 40.
The median follow-up time was 84?months with an interquartile range of 36-99?months. Depressive symptoms reflected susceptibility to all-cause (HR 1?60; 95% CI 1?26-2?04) and cardiovascular mortalities (HR 1?81; 95% CI 1?30-2?52) only in univariable analyses. When cardiovascular illnesses and risk markers were taken into account, depressive symptoms lost their significance as an independent predictor of mortality. BNP as a continuous variable was a significant predictor of both all-cause (HR 1?44; 95% CI 1?22-1?69) and cardiovascular mortalities (HR 1?79; 95% CI 1?44-2?22) in fully adjusted models including depressive symptoms as a covariate.
The prognostic capacity of depressive symptoms is closely linked to cardiovascular morbidity and has no independent power in an elderly general population. BNP remains a strong harbinger of death regardless of depressive symptoms status.
PubMed ID
24621379 View in PubMed
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Drug Burden Index associated with function in community-dwelling older people in Finland: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135253
Source
Ann Med. 2012 Aug;44(5):458-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Danijela Gnjidic
J Simon Bell
Sarah N Hilmer
Eija Lönnroos
Raimo Sulkava
Sirpa Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
Departments of Clinical Pharmacology and Aged Care, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales, Australia. dgnjidic@med.usyd.edu.au
Source
Ann Med. 2012 Aug;44(5):458-67
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Cholinergic Antagonists - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - adverse effects
Male
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the relationship between exposure to anticholinergic and sedative medications, measured with the Drug Burden Index (DBI), and functional outcomes in community-dwelling older people living in Finland.
The study population consisted of community-dwelling older people (n = 700) enrolled in the Geriatric Multidisciplinary Strategy for the Good Care of the Elderly (GeMS) study. Outcomes included walking speed, chair stands test, grip strength, timed up and go (TUG) test, instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), and Barthel Index.
Exposure to DBI drugs was identified in 37% of participants: 24% had a DBI range between >0
PubMed ID
21495785 View in PubMed
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B-type natriuretic peptide as a predictor of declining cognitive function and dementia--a cohort study of an elderly general population with a 5-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144288
Source
Ann Med. 2010 Apr;42(3):207-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Tuomas Kerola
Tuomo Nieminen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Raimo Sulkava
Olli Vuolteenaho
Raimo Kettunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Päijät-Häme Central Hospital, Lahti, Finland. tuomas.kerola@phsotey.fi
Source
Ann Med. 2010 Apr;42(3):207-15
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition
Cognition Disorders - blood - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Dementia - blood - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - complications
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Abstract
Several traditional cardiovascular risk factors assessed in the middle-aged are associated with the risk of dementia, but they are known to lose much of their prognostic value when measured in the elderly. The aim of the study was to compare B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) with previously known risk markers for dementia in their association with cognitive decline and dementia during a follow-up.
A total of 464 subjects free of dementia aged 75 years or more were examined and followed up for 5 years in a prospective population-based stratified cohort study. The association of clinical variables to base-line Mini Mental State Examination score (MMSE), the decline of MMSE, and onset of dementia during the follow-up were examined.
The only variable to significantly associate with the decline of MMSE was BNP (beta 0.140; P = 0.019). A total of 59 new cases of dementia were diagnosed after the follow-up. Significant predictors of the occurrence of dementia over the study period were BNP (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.53; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-2.16; P = 0.013), length of education (OR 0.50; 95% CI 0.33-0.77; P = 0.001), and diagnosis of hypertension (OR 0.53; 95% CI 0.27-0.95; P = 0.036). BNP remained as a significant predictor of dementia and the decline of MMSE even after adjustment to the base-line MMSE.
BNP is an independent harbinger of the cognitive decline and incidence of new onset of dementia in an elderly general population. This is a ground for testing the impact of antihypertensive treatment in the prevention of cognitive impairment in those with elevated BNP.
PubMed ID
20384435 View in PubMed
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Validity of the Finnish Prescription Register for measuring psychotropic drug exposures among elderly finns: a population-based intervention study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144539
Source
Drugs Aging. 2010 Apr 1;27(4):337-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2010
Author
Maria Rikala
Sirpa Hartikainen
Raimo Sulkava
Maarit Jaana Korhonen
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. maria.rikala@uef.fi
Source
Drugs Aging. 2010 Apr 1;27(4):337-49
Date
Apr-1-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Antipsychotic Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Benzodiazepines - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Data Collection
Databases, Factual
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Polypharmacy
Reproducibility of Results
Self Disclosure
Abstract
Pharmacoepidemiological studies assessing the associations between psychotropic drug use and adverse events in the elderly frequently employ automated pharmacy databases as the source of exposure data. However, information on the validity of these databases for estimating psychotropic drug exposures in elderly people is scarce.
This study evaluated the validity of the Finnish Prescription Register for estimating current exposures to psychotropic drugs in elderly people. Furthermore, the potential change in the validity over time was determined.
This was a population-based intervention study (GeMS; Geriatric Multidisciplinary Strategy for the Good Care of the Elderly) conducted between 2004 and 2007. Initially, 1000 randomly selected persons aged >or=75 years living in the City of Kuopio, Finland, in November 2003 were invited to participate in the study. Of these, 716 agreed to participate at baseline (2004) and 570 were still available for 3-year follow-up (2007). The validity of the Prescription Register was assessed by comparing it with the self-reported information collected by interviews in 2004 and in 2007 in the GeMS study. Using the self-reported data as a reference standard, sensitivity, specificity and Cohen's kappa statistic (measure of inter-rater agreement for qualitative [categorical] items) with 95% confidence intervals were computed for different categories and subcategories of psychotropic drugs, applying fixed-time windows of 4, 6 and 12 months.
In 2007, the sensitivity varied between psychotropic categories and subcategories, being generally highest with the 12-month time window (0.57-0.96). The specificity was highest with the 4-month time window (0.94-0.99), showing a slight tendency to decrease with an extended time window. The sensitivity and specificity were highest for antidepressants and antipsychotics, followed by benzodiazepines. The agreement was almost perfect (kappa = 0.81-1.00) or substantial (kappa = 0.61-0.80) for all categories and subcategories of psychotropic drugs. Few differences in validity were observed between the two years.
Using self-reported data as a reference standard, the Prescription Register provides valid information on current exposures to antidepressants and antipsychotics in elderly people if the time window is selected with adequate consideration. However, the validity is lower for benzodiazepines, suggesting that other sources of information should be considered when performing pharmacoepidemiological studies.
PubMed ID
20359263 View in PubMed
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Association between blood pressure and survival over 9 years in a general population aged 85 and older.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168803
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2006 Jun;54(6):912-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Sari Rastas
Tuula Pirttilä
Petteri Viramo
Auli Verkkoniemi
Pirjo Halonen
Kati Juva
Leena Niinistö
Kimmo Mattila
Esko Länsimies
Raimo Sulkava
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Lohja Hospital, Lohja, Finland.
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2006 Jun;54(6):912-8
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Survival Rate - trends
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To investigate the association between blood pressure and mortality in people aged 85 and older.
Population-based prospective study with 9-year follow-up.
Department of Neuroscience and Neurology and Department of Public Health and General Practice, University of Kuopio, and Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Helsinki University Hospital.
Of all 601 people living in the city of Vantaa born before April 1, 1906, whether living at home or in institutions and alive on April 1, 1991, 521 were clinically examined and underwent blood pressure measurement.
Blood pressure was measured using a standardized method in the right arm of the subject after resting for at least 5 minutes. Information on medical history for each participant was verified from a computerized database containing all primary care health records. Death certificates were obtained from the National Register; the collection of death certificates was complete.
After adjusting for age, sex, functional status, and coexisting diseases (earlier-diagnosed myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, dementia, cancer, stroke, or hypertension), low systolic blood pressure (BP) was associated with risk of death.
Low systolic BP may be partially related to poor general health and poor vitality, but the very old may represent a select group of individuals, and the use of BP-lowering medications needs to be evaluated in this group.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2007 Jan;55(1):136-7; author reply 13717233706
PubMed ID
16776785 View in PubMed
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Preference for dentist's home visits among older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101291
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2011 Aug 6;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-6-2011
Author
Kaija Komulainen
Pekka Ylöstalo
Anna-Maija Syrjälä
Piia Ruoppi
Matti Knuuttila
Raimo Sulkava
Sirpa Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
Research Centre of Geriatric Care, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland Faculty of Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology and Geriatric Pharmacotherapy Unit, School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland Social and Health Centre of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland Department of Periodontology, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland Oulu Health Centre, Oulu, Finland Oral and Maxillofacial Department, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland Faculty of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatrics, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland Leppävirta Health Centre, Leppävirta, Finland.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2011 Aug 6;
Date
Aug-6-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Komulainen K, Ylöstalo P, Syrjälä A-M, Ruoppi P, Knuuttila M, Sulkava R, Hartikainen S. Preference for dentist's home visits among older people. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 2011. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S Abstract - Objectives: To investigate factors associated with older people's preference for a dentist's home visit. Methods: This is a report on 321 home-dwelling participants (mean age 81.6) in the population-based Geriatric Multidisciplinary Strategy for Good Care of the Elderly (GeMS) study, conducted in 2004-2005 in the city of Kuopio in eastern Finland. The information about sociodemographic and general health-related factors and the use of social and health services was collected by two study nurses using a structured interview. Each study subject was given a clinical oral examination and an interview about oral health and the use of dental health care services by one of two dentists. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Of the study subjects, 25.9% preferred a dentist's home visit. The preference for choosing a dentist's home visit was associated with a low score (=24) in the Mini-Mental State Examination, OR 6.1 (CI: 2.9-13.6), and a low score (
PubMed ID
21819439 View in PubMed
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47 records – page 1 of 5.