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Depression and cardiovascular diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219289
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1994;377:77-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
A. Aromaa
R. Raitasalo
A. Reunanen
O. Impivaara
M. Heliövaara
P. Knekt
V. Lehtinen
M. Joukamaa
J. Maatela
Author Affiliation
Social Insurance Institution, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1994;377:77-82
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - mortality - psychology
Causality
Cause of Death
Comorbidity
Coronary Disease - mortality - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - complications - mortality - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
We first review the associations between depression and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Then we examine them in the nationally representative Mini-Finland Health Survey, which covers 8,000 persons. Chronic somatic diseases and mental disorders were diagnosed using standardized methods. Cross-sectionally, CVDs and neurotic depression were associated both before and after adjustment for covariates. The strongest associations were observed in the case of severe CVDs. During a 6.6 year follow-up, the risk of CVD death and coronary death was elevated in depressed persons both with and without CVDs at entry. Much of the cross-sectional association is probably due to depression caused by CVDs. The outcome of CVD may be poorer in depressed persons. The hypothesis that depression is a cause of CVDs requires further study.
PubMed ID
8053372 View in PubMed
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Depression and disability pension in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209162
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1997 Mar;95(3):242-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
J K Salminen
S. Saarijärvi
R. Raitasalo
Author Affiliation
Social Insurance Institution, Research and Development Unit, Turku, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1997 Mar;95(3):242-3
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Depressive Disorder - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Disability Evaluation
Eligibility Determination
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Rehabilitation, Vocational - psychology
Abstract
During the period 1987-1994 there has been a threefold increase in disability pensions granted to individuals with affective disorders in Finland. Possible reasons for this development include a deep economic recession, changes in the diagnostic system, and better recognition of affective disorders. Against this background, it seems relevant to ask why, over the same period, the functional capacity of depressive patients has markedly deteriorated, causing an increase in disability pensions, despite the fact that many new drugs and other treatments have become available.
PubMed ID
9111858 View in PubMed
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Elevated lung cancer risk among persons with depressed mood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210350
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1996 Dec 15;144(12):1096-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-1996
Author
P. Knekt
R. Raitasalo
M. Heliövaara
V. Lehtinen
E. Pukkala
L. Teppo
J. Maatela
A. Aromaa
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1996 Dec 15;144(12):1096-103
Date
Dec-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Depressive Disorder - complications - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Lung Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Registries
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Although it has been hypothesized that depressive persons have an excess risk of cancer, few prospective data are available. The association between depressiveness and subsequent incidence of lung cancer was studied in the nationally representative Mini-Finland Health Survey. The study population comprised 7,018 adult men and women, free from cancer at the baseline, carried out in 1978-1980. During a 14-year follow-up, 605 cancer cases occurred, of which 70 were male lung cancer patients. Mental problems and disorders were assessed at the baseline examination using standard interview techniques (General Health Questionnaire and Present State Examination). The relative risk of lung cancer between depressive persons and individuals with a normal depressiveness score was 3.32 (95% confidence interval 1.53-7.20). Neither adjustment for the potential confounding factors of age, education, geographic area, smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index, serum cholesterol, leisure-time exercise, general health, and use of antidepressant medication nor exclusion of cancer cases occurring during the first 4 years of follow-up notably altered the results. There was a strong interaction between depressiveness and smoking. The relative risks of lung cancer between smokers and nonsmokers were 3.38 (95% confidence interval 1.09-10.52) at normal depressiveness score levels and 19.67 (95% confidence interval 2.57-150.7) at strongly elevated levels, respectively. It is possible that depressiveness modifies the effect of smoking on lung cancer risk either by biologic mechanisms or by affecting smoking behavior.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 1996 Dec 15;144(12):1104-68956622
PubMed ID
8956621 View in PubMed
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A feasibility study of organizing occupational health services for farmers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243678
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1982;8 Suppl 1:26-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
I J Vohlonen
K. Husman
E. Kalimo
J. Nuutinen
R. Raitasalo
K. Tupi
R. Virolainen
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1982;8 Suppl 1:26-9
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Finland
Humans
Occupational Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Risk
Abstract
In Finland the Occupational Health Care Act of 1979 provides farmers the possibility of purchasing occupational health services. The main objective of the present study is to develop national model for the organization of occupational health services for farmers. The problems of providing and specifying occupational health services for farmers can be described by two parameters. The first is the type of farm production. The occupational health services to be provided are though to depend on the occupational health risks. The risks vary with the type of farm production, which in turn depends on the geographic location of the farm. The second parameter represents the supply of occupational services to be provided by the municipal health center. The supply has been characterized as occupational health inspections of farms, health examinations, and health education. For the optimization of the supply and the demand, the experiment consists of three models to be tested in respect to two matrices of risk. The feasibility of the models in the 2-a experiment will be evaluated by pre- and postexperimental surveys.
PubMed ID
7100852 View in PubMed
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From the quantitative needs for rehabilitation in Finland in the light of an interview survey and clinical examinations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109685
Source
Acta Sociomed Scand. 1970;2(2):135-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
1970

Health care development in Finland, 1960 to 2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224870
Source
World Health Forum. 1992;13(4):336-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
E. Kalimo
T. Klaukka
R. Lehtonen
K. Nyman
R. Raitasalo
Author Affiliation
Research and Development Unit, Social Insurance Institution, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
World Health Forum. 1992;13(4):336-42
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland
Forecasting
Health Policy - trends
Health Services - trends - utilization
Health Status Indicators
Humans
PubMed ID
1466732 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mental disorders and cause-specific mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46062
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2001 Dec;179:498-502
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
M. Joukamaa
M. Heliövaara
P. Knekt
A. Aromaa
R. Raitasalo
V. Lehtinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. matti.joukamaa@oulu.fi
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2001 Dec;179:498-502
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - mortality
Cause of Death
Depressive Disorder - complications - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - complications - mortality
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration Disorders - complications - mortality
Schizophrenia - complications - mortality
Sex Factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The impact of clinically diagnosed mental disorders on mortality in the general population has not been established. Aims To examine mental disorders for their prediction of cause-specific mortality. METHOD: Mental disorders were determined using the 36-item version of the General Health Questionnaire and the Present State Examination in a nationally representative sample of 8000 adult Finns. RESULTS: During the 17-year follow-up period 1597 deaths occurred. The presence of a mental disorder detected at baseline was associated with an elevated mortality rate. The relative risk in men was 1.6(95% confidence interval 1.3-1.8) and in women, 1.4 (95% Cl 1.2-1.6). In men and women with schizophrenia the relative risks of death during the follow-up period were 3.3 (95% Cl 2.3-4.9) and 2.3 (95% Cl 1.3-3.8) respectively, compared with the rest of the sample. In both men and women with schizophrenia the risk of dying of respiratory disease was increased, but the risk of dying of cardiovascular disease was increased only in men with neurotic depression. CONCLUSIONS: Schizophrenia and depression are associated with an elevated risk of natural and unnatural deaths.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Psychiatry. 2001 Dec;179:477-811731346
Comment In: Evid Based Ment Health. 2002 Aug;5(3):9312180460
PubMed ID
11731351 View in PubMed
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Need for mental health services of the adult population in Finland: results from the Mini Finland Health Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229144
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 May;81(5):426-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1990
Author
V. Lehtinen
M. Joukamaa
E. Jyrkinen
K. Lahtela
R. Raitasalo
J. Maatela
A. Aromaa
Author Affiliation
Rehabilitation Research Centre, Turku, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 May;81(5):426-31
Date
May-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Community Mental Health Services - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Health services research - trends
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Neurotic Disorders - epidemiology
Phobic Disorders - epidemiology
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology
Referral and Consultation - utilization
Abstract
This article presents results on the self-perceived and clinically assessed met and unmet need for mental health care as indicated by the Mini Finland Health Survey, an extensive epidemiological study of the Finnish population aged 30 years or over. The prevalence of self-perceived definite or probable need for care was 6.4% in the men and 8.2% in the women. The corresponding clinical assessments were 14.5% in the men and 19.6% in the women. The need for specialist care was 7.5% in the men and 9.6% in the women. The need was greatest in the middle-aged groups. About 60% of persons in need of care were not receiving any treatment. Half of the treatment received was assessed as inadequate. The treatment situation was much better for psychoses than for neuroses, but it varied little between the different parts of the country.
PubMed ID
2356765 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of mental disorders among adults in Finland: basic results from the Mini Finland Health Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229145
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 May;81(5):418-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1990
Author
V. Lehtinen
M. Joukamaa
K. Lahtela
R. Raitasalo
E. Jyrkinen
J. Maatela
A. Aromaa
Author Affiliation
Rehabilitation Research Centre, Turku, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 May;81(5):418-25
Date
May-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Neurotic Disorders - epidemiology
Personality Tests
Phobic Disorders - epidemiology
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Abstract
The Mini Finland Health Survey was an extensive epidemiological study of the Finnish population aged 30 or over; the prevalence of mental disorders was one aspect studied. Prevalence of symptoms in the General Health Questionnaire as well as the prevalence of self-perceived and clinically assessed mental disorders was studied. The total prevalence of clinically assessed mental disorders was 17.4%, 14.8% in the men and 19.5% in the women. A definite disorder was observed for 11.7% of the subjects. About half of the subjects suffering from a mental disorder according to clinical assessment also reported a self-perceived disorder. Of various diagnoses, the most common were phobic and anxiety neurosis (6.2%) and neurotic depression (4.6%). The prevalence of schizophrenia was 1.3%. The highest prevalence was found in the ages 50 to 64 years. The prevalence of psychoses was highest in northern and eastern Finland, and that of neuroses in southern Finland.
PubMed ID
2356764 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of severe dementia in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238612
Source
Neurology. 1985 Jul;35(7):1025-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1985
Author
R. Sulkava
J. Wikström
A. Aromaa
R. Raitasalo
V. Lehtinen
K. Lahtela
J. Palo
Source
Neurology. 1985 Jul;35(7):1025-9
Date
Jul-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Dementia - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Research Design
Abstract
A sample of 8,000 subjects to represent the population of Finland aged 30 years and over was used to identify patients with severe dementia; 141 cases were found. The prevalence of all types of severe dementia was 1.8% in the whole study population and 6.7% in the population aged 65 years and over. The prevalence increased with advancing age to 17.3% in the age group 85 years and over. Primary degenerative dementia constituted 50% of all cases; multi-infarct and combined dementia, 39%; and secondary dementia, 11%. Fifty-seven percent of the patients lived in institutions.
PubMed ID
4010941 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.