Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Feasibility and validity of three computer-assisted neurobehavioral tests in 7-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34725
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 1996 Jul-Aug;18(4):413-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Dahl
R F White
P. Weihe
N. Sørensen
R. Letz
H K Hudnell
D A Otto
P. Grandjean
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Health, Odense University, Denmark.
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 1996 Jul-Aug;18(4):413-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Denmark
Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted - instrumentation - methods
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Humans
Male
Mercury - blood - toxicity
Neuropsychological Tests - standards
Neurotoxins - toxicity
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Psychomotor Performance - physiology
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Visual Acuity - physiology
Visual Perception - physiology
Abstract
Three tests from the computerized Neurobehavioral Examination System (NES) were administered to a group of 917 Faroese children at approximately 7 years of age. The NES Continuous Performance Test (CPT) was modified to use animal silhouettes as stimuli instead of letters. Almost all children completed Finger Tapping (FT), the modified CPT, and Hand-Eye Coordination (HE). However, 18% of the children missed at least 25% of the stimuli on the CPT (full test period), and 37% of the children did not improve their HE performance by at least 10%, as compared to the first trial. Boys obtained better results than girls, and older children performed better than younger ones. However, both factors were confounded by acquaintance with computer games. Children who used glasses, who had strabismus, or who had decreased contrast sensitivity obtained less satisfactory scores, especially on CPT and HE. The NES performance was significantly associated with functional neurological performance, including catching a ball, diadochokinesia, and finger agnosia. Slight, though statistically significant, decrements were seen with increased levels of prenatal exposure to neurotoxicants, as indicated by the mercury concentrations in cord blood obtained at the time of birth. In conclusion, the tests were feasible in this age group after slight modifications, and the test results showed meaningful associations with major predictors, thus supporting the validity of the data.
PubMed ID
8866532 View in PubMed
Less detail

Reliability of some tremor measurement outcome variables in field testing situations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196291
Source
Neurotoxicology. 2000 Oct;21(5):737-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
R. Letz
F. Gerr
Author Affiliation
Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA. rletz@sph.emory.edu
Source
Neurotoxicology. 2000 Oct;21(5):737-42
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arsenic - toxicity
Continental Population Groups
Demography
Denmark
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Male
Mercury - toxicity
Middle Aged
Neurologic Examination - instrumentation - methods
Neurotoxicity Syndromes - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Observer Variation
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Occupational Exposure
Reproducibility of Results
Tremor - diagnosis - etiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Many summary measures of data obtained from tremor measurement procedures are commonly reported. The reliability of many of these summary measures of tremor measurements made in field testing situations is unknown. The purpose of the present investigation was to assess the reliability of a number of summary measures produced by the software of a widely used, commercially available tremor measurement instrument using data collected in three field epidemiologic studies.
Tremor data were obtained from 689 participants in 3 previously conducted studies of groups exposed to elemental mercury or arsenic. A widely used, commercially available tremor measurement instrument was used. Two-axis accelerometer measurements were obtained on 2 or more trials from each hand for each participant. Estimates of trial-to-trial and internal consistency reliability were calculated for 5 summary measures calculated by instrument manufacturer's software and 5 additional summary measures calculated from data output by the software.
An RMS acceleration measure had the highest reliability in all 3 studies. The average over 4 trials of RMS acceleration and its logarithm had high reliability (>0.9). Recalculation of a tremor summary index and a harmonicity index as suggested by Edwards and Beuter (1999) resulted in measures with higher reliability and better distributional shape than the corresponding measures provided by the instrument manufacturer's software. The results in all three studies were similar.
For the tremor measurement instrument and testing procedure that we employed, we recommend using the common logarithm of the RMS accelerations and recalculated tremor index as summary measures. We also recommend employing multiple trials of each type (e.g., with each hand) and averaging summary measures from those trials to derive outcome measures of tremor for use in epidemiologic studies. We recommend at least 2 trials for RMS acceleration measures and more for less reliable measures, particularly for designs employing repeated measurements of individuals. Summary measures averaged over at least 4 trials for mean frequency, dispersion of frequency, and power in the 3-6.5 and 6.6-10 Hz frequency ranges have sufficiently high reliability for use in epidemiologic studies.
PubMed ID
11130277 View in PubMed
Less detail