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An analysis of the Ontario Health Survey from a cardiovascular perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219521
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 1994;5(3):7-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
R. Kirk-Gardner
D. Steven
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 1994;5(3):7-14
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Abstract
The Ontario Health Survey was conducted in 1990 by the Ontario Ministry of Health to assess the health status of the province's population. Self reports of health status and problems, treatment, and risk factor profiles were collected by interviewer and self-completed questionnaires. The present report addresses the prevalence and distribution patterns of cardiovascular disease and selected risk factors and is based on data from 44,000 residents of Ontario aged 18 years and older. Data collected from the survey demonstrate that the incidence of circulatory disease was 3% and heart disease was 4% in the population of Ontario. As well, the prevalence rates for selected cardiovascular risk factors were: high blood pressure (10%), diabetes (3%), smoking (31%), obesity (25%), and inactivity (72%) and are reported as a function of age category and sex. These findings are compared with the prevalence of risk factors in other regions of Canada. This information provides a basis for the development, implementation, and evaluation of comprehensive programs that are aimed at reducing cardiovascular risk factors and mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease.
PubMed ID
7741974 View in PubMed
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Cardiac risk factors of smoking, hypertension, obesity and family history: a review of the literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226623
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 1991 Apr;2(1):9-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author
R. Kirk-Gardner
J. Crossman
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 1991 Apr;2(1):9-14
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Female
Humans
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology
Male
Meta-Analysis as Topic
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
This review of the literature focuses on risk factors of smoking, hypertension, obesity, and family history that are associated with the development of coronary heart disease. The prevalence of these cardiac risk factors are incorporated from several Canadian health surveys. Health professionals in cardiovascular settings can use the information to develop cardiac teaching programs to promote awareness and healthy cardiac practices in the Canadian population.
PubMed ID
1829893 View in PubMed
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A community survey of cardiac emergency skills: symptom recognition and CPR.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224170
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 1992 Mar;2(4):3-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
R. Kirk-Gardner
J. Crossman
D. Steven
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 1992 Mar;2(4):3-8
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - standards
Consumer Participation
Emergency Medical Services - standards
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - therapy
Ontario
Questionnaires
Abstract
This descriptive study assessed recognition of symptoms of myocardial infarction (MI) by community members and their ability to respond to emergency situations with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills. One thousand questionnaires were randomly mailed to residents with a response rate of 48.1%. Results indicated that residents have limited awareness of symptoms of MI other than demonstrated chest pain and that 20.6% of the respondents had taken a CPR course. CPR courses were taken by 9.6% of respondents who had one or more relatives diagnosed with heart disease. The lack of awareness of symptoms of MI and limited ability to perform CPR skills in emergency situations by community residents may contribute to the high mortality rates due to heart disease. Results of the study suggest that educational campaigns be instituted in the community under study to promote recognition of and response to cardiac emergencies.
PubMed ID
1637493 View in PubMed
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A descriptive survey of cardiac rehabilitation programs in Thunder Bay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227118
Source
Can J Public Health. 1991 Jan-Feb;82(1):63-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Kirk-Gardner
J. Crossman
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1991 Jan-Feb;82(1):63-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - rehabilitation
PubMed ID
2009490 View in PubMed
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Modifiable cardiac risk factors of obesity, inactivity, and stress: a community survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223230
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 1992 Sep-Dec;3(2-3):25-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Kirk-Gardner
J. Crossman
K. Eyjolfsson
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 1992 Sep-Dec;3(2-3):25-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - mortality
Exercise
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
In this descriptive study the perceptions and practices of community residents concerning three risk factors associated with coronary heart disease (obesity, inactivity, and stress) and their prevalence were assessed. One thousand questionnaires were randomly mailed to residents of Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada with a response rate of 48.1%. The results suggest that all three risk factors under study could be contributing to the significantly higher mortality rates in Thunder Bay due to coronary heart disease (when compared to provincial norms). Programs should be developed in the community under study to promote awareness of cardiac risk factors and strategies developed to reduce these risk factors.
PubMed ID
1301077 View in PubMed
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Modifiable cardiac risk factors of smoking, elevated serum cholesterol and hypertension: a community survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222848
Source
Can J Public Health. 1992 Nov-Dec;83(6):437-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Crossman
R. Kirk-Gardner
K. Eyjolfsson
Author Affiliation
Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1992 Nov-Dec;83(6):437-40
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Diet Surveys
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
This descriptive study assessed the prevalence, perceptions and practices of community residents concerning three risk factors most commonly associated with coronary heart disease: smoking behaviour, hypertension and elevated blood cholesterol/dietary factors. One thousand questionnaires were randomly mailed to residents with a response rate of 48.1%. Results indicated that residents identify smoking and dietary factors as major risks for the development of heart disease. Although the prevalence of hypertension and the frequency of blood pressure screening was similar to other provincial and community surveys that investigated cardiac behaviours, differences were found with the prevalence of smoking behaviour, the frequency of blood cholesterol screening, and knowledge and practices of dietary behaviour. As a result of the study, target groups have been identified and programs have been recommended to meet community needs.
PubMed ID
1286446 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.