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[A regional center for reporting adverse drug reactions in UmeƄ. Prompt handling results in quick feedback].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215986
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Jan 18;92(3):148-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-18-1995
Author
M. Bäckström
R. Dahlqvist
T. Mjörndal
O. Spigset
K. Hedenmalm
K. Granberg
U. Oqvist
B E Wiholm
Author Affiliation
Avdelningen för klinisk farmakologi, Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeå.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Jan 18;92(3):148-50
Date
Jan-18-1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - statistics & numerical data
Drug Information Services
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Humans
Sweden
Time Factors
PubMed ID
7837847 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes to reporting adverse drug reactions in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72003
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2000 Dec;56(9-10):729-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
M. Bäckström
T. Mjörndal
R. Dahlqvist
T. Nordkvist-Olsson
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Norrland University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2000 Dec;56(9-10):729-32
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Attitude of Health Personnel
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to investigate attitudes of general practitioners (GPs) and hospital physicians in Sweden towards spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). METHOD: Two areas in the northern region of Sweden were selected for the study. A knowledge and attitude questionnaire followed by a reminder letter 2 weeks later was addressed to all GPs and hospital physicians in the study areas. RESULT: The total response rate from the study areas was 748 of the 1274 questionnaires sent out (58.7%). Of those who responded, 236 were GPs, 433 were hospital physicians and 79 had other positions. Of the responders, 252 stated that they had never reported any ADR and 488 that they had reported at least once in their career. Issues that came out as important in the decision to report or not to report were whether the reaction was considered well-known or not, the severity of the reaction, hesitance to report only on suspicion, lack of knowledge of existing rules, giving priority to other matters and lack of time to report ADRs. Only minor differences in these regards were observed between male and female physicians. CONCLUSION: Our investigation shows that the physicians in northern Sweden have a fairly good knowledge about the existing rules for reporting ADRs in Sweden. However, the attitudes leave room for considerable under-reporting due to matters related mainly to the medical impact of the reaction and of reporting it, but also to the scientific "paradox" of reporting only on suspicion and of course due to lack of time in the health care setting.
PubMed ID
11214784 View in PubMed
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Bf and C3 complement types in rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14641
Source
Hum Hered. 1985;35(4):240-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
S R Dahlqvist
G. Beckman
L. Beckman
Source
Hum Hered. 1985;35(4):240-5
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - genetics - immunology
Complement C3 - genetics
Complement Factor B - genetics
Enzyme Precursors - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Humans
Male
Abstract
Bf and C3 complement types were studied in 100 male and 100 females patients from northern Sweden with erosive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and compared with population controls. A significantly decreased frequency of the Bf FS phenotype was found particularly in males and in patients with a family history of polyarthritis. Significant Bf associations were also found with a more severe form of RA (functional classes III and IV) and with high titers of the rheumatoid factor. No significant difference with respect to C3 phenotype and gene frequencies was found between RA patients and controls. Thus, the association between RA and C3F found in some previous investigations was not confirmed.
PubMed ID
3849467 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis in Northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14262
Source
J Rheumatol. 1997 Mar;24(3):445-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
S. Wallberg-Jonsson
M L Ohman
S R Dahlqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital, Umea, Sweden.
Source
J Rheumatol. 1997 Mar;24(3):445-51
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - blood - mortality
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the overall and the cardiovascular mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Northern Sweden. To analyze the effect of traditional risk factors and factors associated with rheumatoid disease and its treatment on the progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and on mortality by all causes. METHODS: A cohort of 606 patients with seropositive RA were followed from 1979 to the end of 1994 or to the death of the patient. Standardized mortality ratio and survival curves were estimated with the population of Vasterbotten as reference. Sex, age at disease onset, treatment with corticosteroids, use of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) and hormone replacement therapy (HRT), hypertension, diabetes mellitus, HLA types, and cause of death were recorded from disease onset. Cox's proportional hazards regression was used to identify important predictors for death and cardiovascular event during followup. RESULTS: The standardized mortality ratio in both sexes was significantly higher (1.57) for all underlying causes together, for CVD (1.46) and for ischemic heart disease (IHD) (1.54) compared to the reference population. The death rate increased over time. In multiple Cox regression analyses, male sex, higher age at disease onset, and former cardiovascular event increased the death rate. Male sex, high age at disease onset, and hypertension increased the risk of cardiovascular event. Diabetes mellitus, treatment with corticosteroids, DMARD, or HRT did not influence the risks of death or first cardiovascular event. CONCLUSION: The overall mortality and death due to CVD and IHD were in both sexes increased in seropositive RA. Male sex and high age at disease onset predicted death and cardiovascular event. Except for hypertension, which increased the risk for cardiovascular event, neither of these traditional cardiovascular risk factors nor corticosteroid treatment influenced mortality by all causes or by cardiovascular event.
Notes
Comment In: J Rheumatol. 1997 Mar;24(3):415-69058641
PubMed ID
9058647 View in PubMed
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Comparison of the 1987 ACR and 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis in clinical practice: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114555
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2013;42(5):362-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
E. Berglin
S R Dahlqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology, Umeå University , Sweden.
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2013;42(5):362-8
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - classification - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Early Diagnosis
Female
Foot Joints - pathology - radiography
Hand Joints - pathology - radiography
Humans
Male
Methotrexate - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prospective Studies
Rheumatology - methods
Sensitivity and specificity
Symptom Assessment - methods
Synovitis - diagnosis
Abstract
To compare application of the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and 2010 ACR/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) classification criteria for diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical practice.
The medical records of patients with early arthritis attending the Rheumatology Department, Umeå University Hospital (n = 1026) were analysed. Patients with synovitis in at least one joint, no diagnosis other than RA being better for explaining the synovitis, and duration of symptoms less than 1 year at first visit, and at least 1 year of follow-up were included consecutively. Fulfilment of the 1987 and 2010 criteria at baseline was evaluated. Sensitivity and specificity for each criterion set, where estimated by using the outcome measures: initiation of methotrexate (MTX) therapy during the first year, and a clinical diagnosis of RA at the 1-year follow-up. Radiographs of hands and feet were evaluated using the Larsen score.
The study included 313 patients, of whom 56% fulfilled the 1987 ACR criteria, 74% the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria, and 53% both sets of criteria at baseline. The sensitivity/specificity for the 1987 and 2010 criteria with MTX within the first year as the outcome measure was 0.68/0.79 and 0.84/0.54, respectively, and with a diagnosis of RA at follow-up 0.72/0.83 and 0.91/0.65, respectively. Older patients (i.e. = 60 years) more often fulfilled the 2010 criteria. Patients who fulfilled the 2010 ACR/EULAR but not the 1987 ACR criteria had a lower Larsen score at inclusion and after 2 years.
Compared with the 1987 ACR criteria, the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria have higher sensitivity but lower specificity, especially in patients aged = 60 years. The 1987 ACR criteria are suggested to predict a more erosive disease.
PubMed ID
23607599 View in PubMed
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HLA B27 in the population of northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14693
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 1982;11(1):23-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
A. Bjelle
B. Cedergren
S R Dahlqvist
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 1982;11(1):23-6
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - immunology
Comparative Study
HLA Antigens - analysis
HLA-B27 Antigen
Humans
Reiter Disease - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spondylitis, Ankylosing - immunology
Sweden
Abstract
The frequency of HLA B27 in blood donors born in northern Sweden was found to be 16.6%. This was significantly higher than in southern Sweden or in caucasians generally, with the exception of Finland. A close genetic relationship has been found between the population of northern Sweden and the Finnish. The higher frequency of HLA B27 is particularly interesting in view of the finding of a higher incidence of rheumatic diseases in northern than in southern Sweden. We also found a surprisingly large number of patients with reactive arthritides and ankylosing spondylitis in the patient registers of the rheumatology department, which further indicated a genetic influence on rheumatic disorders in northern Sweden.
PubMed ID
6977838 View in PubMed
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HLA genotypes in two three-generation families with rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14624
Source
Hum Immunol. 1985 Aug;13(4):243-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1985
Author
H. Ström
S R Dahlqvist
A. Bjelle
E. Möller
Source
Hum Immunol. 1985 Aug;13(4):243-51
Date
Aug-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - genetics - immunology
Cells, Cultured
Female
Genes, MHC Class II
Genotype
HLA Antigens - genetics
HLA-A Antigens
HLA-B Antigens
HLA-C Antigens
HLA-DR Antigens
Histocompatibility Antigens Class II - analysis
Humans
Lymphocytes - cytology - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Pedigree
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Two three-generation families from Northern Sweden with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were clinically examined. Tissue typing was performed for HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DR antigens. No disease-associated haplotype could be defined within these families. Six of nine members with RA were HLA-DR4 positive. Both families had a HLA-DR4 containing haplotype in the first generation and second-generation members married DR4 positive individuals, which probably increased the risk to develop RA in the third-generation members.
PubMed ID
3928542 View in PubMed
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[How important is following the physician's instructions? Demands on patients vary among different individual groups]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36121
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Sep 15;90(37):3092-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1993

Incorrect use and limited weight reduction of orlistat (Xenical) in clinical practice. A cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193317
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Jul;57(4):309-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
B. Beermann
H. Melander
J. Säwe
C. Ulleryd
R. Dahlqvist
Author Affiliation
Medical Products Agency, Uppsala, Sweden. bjorn.beermann@mpa.se
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Jul;57(4):309-11
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Drug Prescriptions - standards
Female
Humans
Lactones - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Sweden
Treatment Refusal
Weight Loss
Abstract
To study the prescribing of the antiobesity drug orlistat in relation to the approved indication and its weight-reducing effect in clinical practice during the first 3 months of treatment.
Anonymous postal questionnaire survey to prescribers of orlistat concerning a random sample of 1000 of 20,000 prescriptions.
Useful information was obtained for 789 patients.
Primary and secondary care in Sweden.
Beginning and continued treatment according to the approved indication. Dropout from treatment. Weight loss during treatment.
Four percent of the patients were prescribed orlistat despite having a body mass index (BMI) less than 28 kg/m2. Only 24% of the patients had a diet period with a weight loss of 2.5 kg or greater before the start of therapy. Half of the patients with a weight loss of less than 5% after 3 months continued the treatment. Ten percent gained weight or had no weight loss at all while 43% lost less than 5% in weight. At least one-quarter of the patients stopped the treatment within the observation period.
Orlistat was not prescribed according to the approved indication in the majority of cases. The dropout rate was high and most patients had minor gain from the treatment.
PubMed ID
11549209 View in PubMed
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