Skip header and navigation

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Air ambulance trauma transport: a quality review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211636
Source
J Trauma. 1996 Jul;41(1):26-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
M. van Wijngaarden
J. Kortbeek
R. Lafreniere
R. Cunningham
E. Joughin
R. Yim
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
J Trauma. 1996 Jul;41(1):26-31
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Ambulances - standards
Alberta
Female
Humans
Male
Quality Control
Quality of Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Triage - utilization
Utilization Review
Wounds and Injuries
Abstract
Provincial air ambulance transports of injured patients were quality reviewed prospectively to determine utilization and appropriateness of care.
All trauma air ambulance transports over a 2-month span were reviewed prospectively. Revised Trauma Score, Injury Severity Score, probability of survival, prehospital time, distance of transport, procedures performed, and outcome were determined. Quality control questions were asked of the sending and receiving physicians.
The majority of air ambulance transports reviewed (N = 97) were indicated for mechanism and severity of injury. Economics and requirement for advanced medical care were indications in only 15%. Physicians tended to perform more advanced procedures, likely related to higher patient Injury Severity Score (23 vs. 15, p = NS). Four problems with air ambulance access were identified. The overtriage rate was 5%. Inappropriate patient care was documented in six (6%) cases; a physician was present for only one of these.
A low overtriage rate was documented, raising concerns that the undertriage rate may be too high. Injured patients air transported without physician accompaniment more often received inappropriate care, suggesting that physician accompaniment is beneficial.
PubMed ID
8676420 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canada: warnings with colour pictures required.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196448
Source
Tob Control. 2000 Dec;9(4):359
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
R. Cunningham
Source
Tob Control. 2000 Dec;9(4):359
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic
Canada
Humans
Plants, Toxic
Tobacco
PubMed ID
11106703 View in PubMed
Less detail

Injury patterns at US and Canadian overnight summer camps: first year of the Healthy Camp study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146966
Source
Inj Prev. 2009 Dec;15(6):413-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
E. Goldlust
E. Walton
R. Stanley
E. Yard
B. Garst
R D Comstock
L E Erceg
R. Cunningham
Author Affiliation
University of Michigan Medical School, Department of Emergency Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. eric_goldlust@brown.edu
Source
Inj Prev. 2009 Dec;15(6):413-7
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Camping - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Periodicity
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Trauma Severity Indices
United States - epidemiology
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe injury patterns at overnight summer camps in 2006, and identify risk factors for more significant injury.
Surveillance data obtained from Healthy Camp Study from 2006 were analyzed from 71 overnight camps, representing 437,541 camper-days and 206,031 staff-days.
Injuries were reported in 218 campers and 81 staff. 51.8% of injured campers were male versus 34.6% of staff. Among campers, 60.1% were evaluated off-site; 2.3% required hospital admission. 43.9% of injuries required >24 h activity restriction (deemed "significant injury"). Among campers, significant injury was associated with camp sessions > or =14 days (RR 1.48); among staff, with male sex (RR 1.85) and camper-to-staff ratio (RR 0.67). There were no associations with age, time of day, setting, or level of supervision.
Significant injuries are uncommon at overnight summer camps. Rates appear similar to those in comparable activities. Targeted interventions may further reduce injury risk.
PubMed ID
19959735 View in PubMed
Less detail