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1,3-Butadiene: exposure estimation, hazard characterization, and exposure-response analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186649
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2003 Jan-Feb;6(1):55-83
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Hughes
M E Meek
M. Walker
R. Beauchamp
Author Affiliation
Existing Substances Division, Environmental Health Directorate, Health Canada, Environmental Health Centre, Tunney's Pasture PL0802B1, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0L2.
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2003 Jan-Feb;6(1):55-83
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Butadienes - metabolism - toxicity
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinogens, Environmental - toxicity
Environmental Exposure
Hazardous Substances - toxicity
Humans
Mutagens - toxicity
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Abstract
1,3-Butadiene has been assessed as a Priority Substance under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. The general population in Canada is exposed to 1,3-butadiene primarily through ambient air. Inhaled 1,3-butadiene is carcinogenic in both mice and rats, inducing tumors at multiple sites at all concentrations tested in all identified studies. In addition, 1,3-butadiene is genotoxic in both somatic and germ cells of rodents. It also induces adverse effects in the reproductive organs of female mice at relatively low concentrations. The greater sensitivity in mice than in rats to induction of these effects by 1,3-butadiene is likely related to species differences in metabolism to active epoxide metabolites. Exposure to 1,3-butadiene in the occupational environment has been associated with the induction of leukemia; there is also some limited evidence that 1,3-butadiene is genotoxic in exposed workers. Therefore, in view of the weight of evidence of available epidemiological and toxicological data, 1,3-butadiene is considered highly likely to be carcinogenic, and likely to be genotoxic, in humans. Estimates of the potency of butadiene to induce cancer have been derived on the basis of both epidemiological investigation and bioassays in mice and rats. Potencies to induce ovarian effects have been estimated on the basis of studies in mice. Uncertainties have been delineated, and, while there are clear species differences in metabolism, estimates of potency to induce effects are considered justifiably conservative in view of the likely variability in metabolism across the population related to genetic polymorphism for enzymes for the critical metabolic pathway.
PubMed ID
12587254 View in PubMed
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Age-related macular degeneration: economic burden and value-based medicine analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174359
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2005 Jun;40(3):277-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Melissa M Brown
Gary C Brown
Joshua D Stein
Zachary Roth
Joseph Campanella
George R Beauchamp
Author Affiliation
Center for Value-Based Medicine, Flourtown 19031, and the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, USA. mbrown@valuebasedmedicine.com
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2005 Jun;40(3):277-87
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Evidence-Based Medicine - economics
Health Care Costs - trends
Humans
Incidence
Macular Degeneration - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
It can be estimated that 17,100 new cases of neovascular (wet) AMD and 180,000 new cases of geographic-atrophy (dry) AMD occur in Canada annually. In addition to having a devastating effect on patients' lives, the condition causes significant adverse consequences for the economy. The deleterious effect of AMD on quality of life is markedly underestimated by ophthalmologists who treat patients with AMD, by non-ophthalmic physicians and by the public. In fact, patients with different degrees of severity of AMD have a perceived impairment of their quality of life that is 96% to 750% greater than the impairment estimated by treating ophthalmologists. Mild AMD causes a 17% decrease in the quality of life of the average patient, a decrease similar to that encountered with symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus infection or moderate cardiac angina. Moderate AMD produces a 40% decrease in quality of life, a decrease similar to that associated with permanent renal dialysis or severe cardiac angina. Very severe AMD causes a 63% decrement in quality of life, a decrease similar to that encountered with advanced prostatic cancer with uncontrollable pain or a severe stroke that leaves a person bedridden, incontinent and requiring constant nursing care. The adverse economic consequences of AMD include an annual $2.6 billion negative impact on Canada's gross domestic product. The return on investment is high for both current AMD therapies and research into new treatment modalities.
PubMed ID
15947797 View in PubMed
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The application of transformational leadership theory to parenting: questionnaire development and implications for adolescent self-regulatory efficacy and life satisfaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130615
Source
J Sport Exerc Psychol. 2011 Oct;33(5):688-709
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Katie L Morton
Julian Barling
Ryan E Rhodes
Louise C Mâsse
Bruno D Zumbo
Mark R Beauchamp
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology, University of British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Sport Exerc Psychol. 2011 Oct;33(5):688-709
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
British Columbia
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Leadership
Male
Parenting - psychology
Parents - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
Psychological Theory
Questionnaires - standards
Self Efficacy
Abstract
We draw upon transformational leadership theory to develop an instrument to measure transformational parenting for use with adolescents. First, potential items were generated that were developmentally appropriate and evidence for content validity was provided through the use of focus groups with parents and adolescents. We subsequently provide evidence for several aspects of construct validity of measures derived from the Transformational Parenting Questionnaire (TPQ). Data were collected from 857 adolescents (M(age) = 14.70 years), who rated the behaviors of their mothers and fathers. The results provided support for a second-order measurement model of transformational parenting. In addition, positive relationships between mothers' and fathers' transformational parenting behaviors, adolescents' self-regulatory efficacy for physical activity and healthy eating, and life satisfaction were found. The results of this research support the application of transformational leadership theory to parenting behaviors, as well as the construct validity of measures derived from the TPQ.
PubMed ID
21984642 View in PubMed
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Botulinum toxin-A use in paediatric hypertonia: Canadian practice patterns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123148
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2012 Jul;39(4):508-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
D. Fehlings
U. Narayanan
J. Andersen
R. Beauchamp
J W Gorter
A. Kawamura
G. Kiefer
M. Mason
A. McCormick
R. Mesterman
L. Switzer
J. Watt
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. dfehlings@hollandbloorview.ca
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2012 Jul;39(4):508-15
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Botulinum Toxins, Type A - therapeutic use
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Electromyography
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Muscle Hypertonia - drug therapy - physiopathology
Neuromuscular Agents - therapeutic use
Pain Measurement
Pediatrics
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aims to assess current practices of Canadian physicians providing botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A) treatments for children with hypertonia and to contrast these with international "best practice" recommendations, in order to identify practice variability and opportunities for knowledge translation.
Thirteen Canadian physicians assembled to develop and analyze results of a cross-sectional electronic survey, sent to 50 physicians across Canada.
Seventy-eight percent (39/50) of physicians completed the survey. The most frequently identified assessment tools were Gross Motor Function Classification System, Modified Tardieu Scale and neurological examination. Goal-setting tools were infrequently utilized. Common indications for BoNT-A injections and the muscles injected were identified. Significant variability was identified in using BoNT-A for hip displacement associated with hypertonia. The most frequent adverse event reported was localized weakness; 54% reporting this "occasionally" and 15% "frequently". Generalized weakness, fatigue, ptosis, diplopia, dysphagia, aspiration, respiratory distress, dysphonia and urinary incontinence were reported rarely or never. For dosage, 52% identified 16 Units/kg body weight of Botox® as maximum. A majority (64%) reported a maximum 400 Units for injection at one time. For localization, electrical stimulation and ultrasound were used infrequently (38% and 19% respectively). Distraction was the most frequently used pain-management technique (64%).
Canadian physicians generally adhere to international best practices when using BoNT-A to treat paediatric hypertonia. Two knowledge-translation opportunities were identified: use of individualized goal setting prior to BoNT-A and enhancing localization techniques. Physicians reported a good safety profile of BoNT-A in children.
PubMed ID
22728860 View in PubMed
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Chloroform: exposure estimation, hazard characterization, and exposure-response analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189119
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2002 Jul-Sep;5(3):283-334
Publication Type
Article
Author
M E Meek
R. Beauchamp
G. Long
D. Moir
L. Turner
M. Walker
Author Affiliation
Existing Substances Division, Environmental Health Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2002 Jul-Sep;5(3):283-334
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis
Animals
Baths - adverse effects
Canada
Chloroform - adverse effects - analysis
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Humans
Neoplasms - chemically induced
Risk assessment
Water Pollutants, Chemical - adverse effects - analysis
Abstract
Chloroform has been assessed as a Priority Substance under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. The general population in Canada is exposed to chloroform principally through inhalation of indoor air, particularly during showering, and through ingestion of tap water. Data on concentrations of chloroform in various media were sufficient to serve as the basis for development of deterministic and probabilistic estimates of exposure for the general population in Canada. On the basis of data acquired principally in studies in experimental animals, chloroform causes hepatic and renal tumors in mice and renal tumors in rats. The weight of evidence indicates that chloroform is likely carcinogenic only at concentrations that induce the obligatory precursor lesions of cytotoxicity and proliferative regenerative response. Since this cytotoxicity is primarily related to rates of formation of reactive, oxidative metabolites, dose response has been characterized in the context of rates of formation of reactive metabolites in the target tissue. Results presented here are from a "hybrid" physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) animal model that was revised to permit its extension to humans. The relevant measure of exposure response, namely, the mean rate of metabolism in humans associated with a 5% increase in tumor risk (TC05), was estimated on the basis of this PBPK model and compared with tissue dose measures resulting from 24-h multimedia exposure scenarios for Canadians based on midpoint and 95th percentiles for concentrations in outdoor air, indoor air, air in the shower compartment, air in the bathroom after showering, tap water, and food. Nonneoplastic effects observed most consistently at lowest concentrations or doses following repeated exposures of rats and mice to chloroform are cytotoxicity and regenerative proliferation. As for cancer, target organs are the liver and kidney. In addition, chloroform has induced nasal lesions in rats and mice exposed by both inhalation and ingestion at lowest concentrations or doses. The mean rate of metabolism associated with a 5% increase in fatty cysts estimated on the basis of the PBPK model was compared with tissue dose measures resulting from the scenarios already described, and lowest concentrations reported to induce cellular proliferation in the nasal cavities of rats and mice were compared directly with midpoint and 95th percentile estimates of concentrations of chloroform in indoor air in Canada. The degree of confidence in the underlying database and uncertainties in estimates of exposure and in characterization of hazard and dose response are delineated.
PubMed ID
12162870 View in PubMed
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Development and psychometric properties of the transformational teaching questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143124
Source
J Health Psychol. 2010 Nov;15(8):1123-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Mark R Beauchamp
Julian Barling
Zhen Li
Katie L Morton
Sharon E Keith
Bruno D Zumbo
Author Affiliation
School of Human Kinetics, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. mark.beauchamp@ubc.ca
Source
J Health Psychol. 2010 Nov;15(8):1123-34
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Behavioral Medicine
British Columbia
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Faculty
Female
Humans
Leadership
Male
Physical Education and Training
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Students - psychology
Abstract
We draw from transformational leadership theory (Bass & Riggio, 2006) to develop a reliable and valid measure of transformational teaching, for use within school-based physical education contexts. In Phase 1, we utilized established instrument development procedures, involving teachers, students, and experts in transformational leadership theory to ensure that items exhibited sound content validity, and were developmentally appropriate. In Phase 2, multilevel confirmatory factor analytic procedures with 2761 adolescents supported the factorial validity of the Transformational Teaching Questionnaire. In Phase 3, concurrent validity of the TTQ was supported by positive relationships between transformational teaching and adolescent self-determined motivation and positive affect.
PubMed ID
20522503 View in PubMed
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Pre-competition imagery, self-efficacy and performance in collegiate golfers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188764
Source
J Sports Sci. 2002 Sep;20(9):697-705
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Mark R Beauchamp
Steven R Bray
John G Albinson
Author Affiliation
School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.
Source
J Sports Sci. 2002 Sep;20(9):697-705
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Female
Golf - psychology
Humans
Imagination
Male
Motivation
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Self Efficacy
Abstract
In this study, we examined the relationships between self-efficacy, pre-competition imagery use and performance. A modified version of the Sport Imagery Questionnaire was used to assess both the motivational and cognitive functions of imagery used by 51 varsity golfers during the hour before a Provincial University Golf Championship. In line with Martin and co-workers' model of imagery use in sport, we hypothesized that self-efficacy would be positively related to motivational general-mastery imagery use and motivational general-mastery imagery use would be predictive of golf performance. Also, consistent with theorizing by Bandura, we hypothesized that self-efficacy would predict golf performance, but that the relationship between self-efficacy and performance would be mediated by imagery use. The results of hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that pre-competition motivational general-mastery imagery accounted for significant variance in both self-efficacy (adjusted R2 = 0.26, P
PubMed ID
12200921 View in PubMed
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The relationship between intra-group age similarity and exercise adherence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128695
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2012 Jan;42(1):53-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
William L Dunlop
Mark R Beauchamp
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. wdunlop@psych.ubc.ca
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2012 Jan;42(1):53-5
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Canada
Data Collection
Exercise - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - psychology
Prospective Studies
Abstract
Research within social and organizational psychology is replete with evidence for a positive relationship between intra-group demographic similarity and group-based attraction/involvement. This relationship, however, remains largely unexplored within applied health settings.
The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which intra-group age similarity relates to individual adherence behaviors within group-based exercise programs.
A prospective observational design was used in which participants' (N=123) age similarity was assessed in relation to program adherence over a period of several months. Data were collected from within a large city in Western Canada during the winter of 2011. Analyses were performed using a multilevel framework shortly after data collection.
A positive relationship was observed between age similarity and program adherence (ß=0.19, SE=0.09, p=0.04).
The findings are consistent with the notion that program adherence may be enhanced if age similarity is maximized.
PubMed ID
22176846 View in PubMed
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Testing the effects of an expectancy-based intervention among adolescents: Can placebos be used to enhance physical health?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133027
Source
Psychol Health Med. 2011 Aug;16(4):405-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Mark R Beauchamp
Ryan E Rhodes
Silvia Hua
Katie L Morton
Christiane Kreutzer
Jennifer A Liang
Kevin Y K Khou
Paolo B Dominelli
Deana M Daoud
Megan F B Sherman
William L Dunlop
Andrew W Sheel
Author Affiliation
School of Human Kinetics, University of British Columbia, BC, Canada. mark.beauchamp@ubc.ca
Source
Psychol Health Med. 2011 Aug;16(4):405-17
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
British Columbia - epidemiology
Exercise - psychology
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Placebo Effect
Self Report
Abstract
It has been suggested that the well-known health benefits associated with exercise can be explained by a placebo effect, and that greater effort should be given to convince people that their current behaviors have desirable health consequences. The overall purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of this "mind-set matters" hypothesis through the use of an expectancy-based intervention with adolescents. The study involved a four week randomized controlled trial with 348 Grade 9 adolescents (M (age) = 14.07 yrs, SD = 0.30), from four high schools, taking part in either a placebo-intervention condition (n = 188) or a control condition (n = 160). Participants in the placebo-intervention condition were informed that what they are already doing in school physical education lessons fulfills current recommendations for an active lifestyle. Participants in the control condition were not given this information. Four weeks after the intervention, adolescents in the placebo-intervention condition did not demonstrate significant changes in physiological health-related measures (diet, weight, body mass index, percentage body fat, heart rate, mean arterial pressure). The findings question the external validity of the "mind-set matters" hypothesis with adolescents, and suggest that simply encouraging adolescents to believe that they are healthy may not enable them to respond with improved indicators of physical health.
PubMed ID
21749238 View in PubMed
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Transformational teaching and adolescent physical activity: multilevel and mediational effects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256588
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2014 Jun;21(3):537-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
M R Beauchamp
Y. Liu
K L Morton
L J Martin
A H Wilson
A J Wilson
B D Sylvester
B D Zumbo
J. Barling
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology, The University of British Columbia, 122-6081 University Boulevard, Vancouver, V6T 1Z1, Canada, mark.beauchamp@ubc.ca.
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2014 Jun;21(3):537-46
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
British Columbia
Faculty
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Leadership
Leisure Activities
Male
Models, Statistical
Motor Activity
Physical Education and Training
Prospective Studies
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Regular physical activity is associated with a range of physical and psychological health benefits. In North America the majority of adolescents are insufficiently active.
The purpose of this study was to examine the prospective relationship between adolescents' perceptions of transformational leadership displayed by their school physical education teachers and their own physical activity behaviors, both with respect to within-class physical activity (WCPA) and also leisure time physical activity (LTPA).
The study used a prospective observational design. Using multilevel structural equation modeling (MSEM), we examined the extent to which adolescents' affective attitudes mediated the effects of teachers' behaviors on adolescents' physical activity responses. Two thousand nine hundred and forty-eight adolescents (M age = 14.33, SD = 1.00, N female = 1,641, 55.7 %) from 133 Grade 8-10 classes in British Columbia (Canada) provided ratings of their physical education teachers' behaviors midway through the school year. Two months later, students completed measures of affective attitudes, WCPA, and LTPA.
The results indicated that adolescents' perceptions of transformational teaching explained significant variance in both WCPA and LTPA, and these effects were fully mediated by adolescents' affective attitudes (total indirect effect: b = 0.581, p
PubMed ID
23760732 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.