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Association between habitual dietary intake and lipoprotein subclass profile in healthy young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117107
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2013 Nov;23(11):1071-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
L H Bogl
K H Pietiläinen
A. Rissanen
A J Kangas
P. Soininen
R J Rose
M. Ala-Korpela
J. Kaprio
Author Affiliation
The Finnish Twin Cohort Study, Department of Public Health, Hjelt Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: leonie-helen.bogl@helsinki.fi.
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2013 Nov;23(11):1071-8
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Biological Markers - blood
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Docosahexaenoic Acids - blood
Fast Foods - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fishes
Food Habits
Health promotion
Humans
Lipoproteins - blood - chemistry
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Nutrition Policy
Particle Size
Patient compliance
Seafood
Young Adult
Abstract
Nutritional epidemiology is increasingly shifting its focus from studying single nutrients to the exploration of the whole diet utilizing dietary pattern analysis. We analyzed associations between habitual diet (including macronutrients, dietary patterns, biomarker of fish intake) and lipoprotein particle subclass profile in young adults.
Complete dietary data (food-frequency questionnaire) and lipoprotein subclass profile (via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy) were available for 663 subjects from the population-based FinnTwin12 study (57% women, age: 21-25 y). The serum docosahexaenoic to total fatty acid ratio was used as a biomarker of habitual fish consumption. Factor analysis identified 5 dietary patterns: "Fruit and vegetables", "Meat", "Sweets and desserts", "Junk food" and "Fish". After adjustment for sex, age, body mass index, waist circumference, physical activity, smoking status and alcohol intake, the "Junk food" pattern was positively related to serum triglycerides (r = 0.12, P = 0.002), a shift in the subclass distribution of VLDL toward larger particles (r = 0.12 for VLDL size, P
PubMed ID
23333726 View in PubMed
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Change in cohabitation and intrapair similarity of monozygotic (MZ) cotwins for alcohol use, extraversion, and neuroticism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229492
Source
Behav Genet. 1990 Mar;20(2):265-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
Author
J. Kaprio
M. Koskenvuo
R J Rose
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Behav Genet. 1990 Mar;20(2):265-76
Date
Mar-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Diseases in Twins
Extraversion (Psychology)
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Neurotic Disorders - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Residence Characteristics
Social Class
Social Environment
Twins - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - psychology
Abstract
We have reported cross-sectional evidence that behavioral similarities of adult monozygotic (MZ) cotwins are associated with their age at initial separation and the frequency of their subsequent social interaction (Kaprio et al., 1987; Rose et al., 1988; Rose and Kaprio, 1988). Twins who separated early and twins in infrequent interaction were less alike. Data for those reports came from a 1981 survey of the Finnish Twin Cohort. The Finnish cohort had been surveyed in 1975 with a similar questionnaire, and we now report a longitudinal analysis of the 1975-1981 surveys. All cohabiting MZ cotwins, ages 18-25 at the 1975 baseline, were followed up in 1981, and pairwise similarities at baseline and follow-up were compared for three groups: MZ pairs that remained cohabiting, separated pairs in which the cotwins retained regular contact with one another, and separated cotwins whose social interactions at follow-up were infrequent. For alcohol consumption and EPI Neuroticism scores, relative similarities of the MZ cotwins at follow-up paralleled the relative frequencies of their social contact; baseline differences in resemblance for Extraversion scores preceded follow-up differences in social interaction. These findings clarify the directional nature of associations found in our cross-sectional data and provide new, more compelling evidence of effects of shared experience on sibling resemblance for some dimensions of adult behavior.
PubMed ID
2353911 View in PubMed
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Chernobyl exposure as stressor during pregnancy and hormone levels in adolescent offspring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158128
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2008 Apr;62(4):e5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
A C Huizink
M. Bartels
R J Rose
L. Pulkkinen
C J P Eriksson
J. Kaprio
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. a.c.huizink@erasmusmc.nl
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2008 Apr;62(4):e5
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Female
Finland
Humans
Hydrocortisone - metabolism
Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Pituitary-Adrenal System - physiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology
Pregnancy Trimesters
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - psychology
Puberty - metabolism
Saliva - chemistry
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Testosterone - metabolism
Abstract
Animal research suggests a programming effect of prenatal stress in the fetal period, resulting in disruptions in behavioural and neuromotor development. Physiological changes that mediate these effects include alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and in testosterone levels. This human study focuses on changes related to these physiological systems after prenatal stress exposure.
We examined the potential effect of prenatal stress associated with the Chernobyl disaster in an ongoing genetic epidemiological study in Finland. One birth cohort of twins (n = 121 twin pairs) was exposed in utero to maternal stress, and their saliva cortisol and testosterone levels at age 14 were compared with twins (n = 157 twin pairs) born one year later.
Cortisol levels in both sexes and testosterone levels among females were significantly elevated after prenatal exposure to maternal stress from the second trimester onwards, compared to reference groups of non-exposed adolescents. Exposure explains 3% of variance (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
18365332 View in PubMed
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Common genetic influences on BMI and age at menarche.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214205
Source
Hum Biol. 1995 Oct;67(5):739-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
J. Kaprio
A. Rimpelä
T. Winter
R J Viken
M. Rimpelä
R J Rose
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Hum Biol. 1995 Oct;67(5):739-53
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Aging - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight
Child
Confidence Intervals
Female
Finland
Humans
Menarche - genetics - physiology
Reproducibility of Results
Twins - genetics
Abstract
Genetic influences on variability of body weight and onset of menarche are well known. To investigate the genetic and environmental contributions to the association of body weight with onset of menarche, we studied Finnish twins from consecutive birth cohorts (the FinnTwin16 study) ascertained from the national population registry, which identifies nearly 100% of all living twins. Baseline questionnaires were mailed to the twins within 60 days of their sixteenth birthday and later to older sibs of the twins. Pairwise response rates (approximately 85% across gender and zygosity) and 30 months of data collection yielded results from 1283 twin pairs. The questionnaires included a survey of health habits and attitudes, a symptom checklist, MMPI personality scales, and a survey of relationships with parents, peers, and the co-twin. Age at menarche was reported by 468 monozygotic (MZ) girls, 378 girls from like-sex dizygotic (FDZ) pairs, 434 girls from opposite-sex (OSDZ) pairs, and 141 older female sibs of the twins. The one-month test-retest reliability of age at menarche in an independent sample (N = 136) of 16-year-olds from a national survey was 0.96. Girls from OSDZ pairs had a significantly higher mean age at menarche (13.33 yr) than FDZ girls (13.13 yr) (difference, 0.20 yr; 95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.35). The MZ correlation for age at menarche was 0.75, the DZ correlation was 0.31, and the sib-twin correlation was 0.32. A bivariate twin analysis of age at menarche and body mass index (wt/ht2) indicated that 37% of the variance in age at menarche can be attributed to additive genetic effects, 37% to dominance effects, and 26% to unique environmental effects. The correlation between additive genetic effects on age at menarche and body mass index was 0.57, indicating a substantial proportion of genetic effects in common.
PubMed ID
8543288 View in PubMed
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Consistency and change in patterns of social drinking: a 6-year follow-up of the Finnish Twin Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224022
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1992 Apr;16(2):234-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
J. Kaprio
R. Viken
M. Koskenvuo
K. Romanov
R J Rose
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1992 Apr;16(2):234-40
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - genetics - psychology
Alcoholism - genetics - psychology
Cohort Studies
Diseases in Twins - genetics - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Individuality
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Models, Genetic
Phenotype
Risk factors
Social Environment
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics - psychology
Abstract
In 1975 and again in 1981, all adult twins in the population-based Finnish Twin Cohort were administered postal questionnaires yielding data on self-reported frequency and quantity of alcohol use. The longitudinal results provide information on the age-to-age stability of social drinking patterns among 13,404 (twin) individuals aged 18 to 43 at baseline; model-fitting the cross-temporal consistency of the twins' reported alcohol use yields unique estimates of the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to their individual age-to-age stabilities. Mean consumption levels did not change between 1975 and 1981. Patterns of social drinking were more stable in older (aged 24-43 at baseline) than younger (aged 18-23 at baseline) adult twins, and were more stable among men than women. Heritabilities were significant at both baseline and follow-up for all three alcohol measures in both genders and both age groups, with a median magnitude of 0.48. Both longitudinal genetic and environmental covariances were significant, and both were generally higher among older pairs. Genetic covariances (median magnitude = 0.68) were significantly higher than environmental covariances (median = 0.36). Analyses of absolute changes in alcohol use revealed heritable influences on the disposition to change. We conclude that genes contribute to both consistency and change in patterns of alcohol use from early to midadulthood.
PubMed ID
1590545 View in PubMed
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Design and sampling considerations, response rates, and representativeness in a Finnish Twin Family Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235778
Source
Acta Genet Med Gemellol (Roma). 1987;36(1):79-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
J. Kaprio
R J Rose
S. Sarna
H. Langinvainio
M. Koskenvuo
H. Rita
K. Heikkilä
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Genet Med Gemellol (Roma). 1987;36(1):79-93
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Family
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality
Questionnaires
Registries
Research Design
Smoking
Social Class
Twins
Abstract
Kinships composed of twin parents, their spouses and children, offer a robust and flexible sampling design for research in genetic epidemiology. Families-of-twins designs circumvent some of the sampling problems that arise when independent data sets are combined, and these designs provide unique evaluations of maternal influences, assortative mating and X-linkage. Unfortunately, empirical studies of families of twin parents have been limited by relatively small samples and by the self-selection biases intrinsic in ascertainment of families from volunteer twin registries. A large and representative cohort of monozygotic and dizygotic twin parents, drawn from a population-based twin registry, provides the optimal sampling frame for twin-family research. This paper reviews the sampling considerations underlying the initial family study based on the Finnish Twin Cohort and evaluates the representativeness of the sampled twins. Spouses and adult children (over 18 years) of 236 pairs of twins, about equally divided by gender and zygosity, were evaluated by a postal questionnaire. Individual response rates exceeded 86% and in 464 of the 472 nuclear families (98.3%), at last one member of the twin's family completed the questionnaire. The sampled twins, selected for fecundity to maximize statistical power of the obtained data, were broadly representative of non-selected twins drawn from the Cohort, with whom they were matched on age, gender, and zygosity. Such results suggest that the Finnish Cohort has excellent potential for extended twin-family research designs.
PubMed ID
3673480 View in PubMed
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Distribution and heritability of BMI in Finnish adolescents aged 16y and 17y: a study of 4884 twins and 2509 singletons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202883
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1999 Feb;23(2):107-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
K H Pietiläinen
J. Kaprio
A. Rissanen
T. Winter
A. Rimpelä
R J Viken
R J Rose
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1999 Feb;23(2):107-15
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Height - genetics
Body mass index
Body Weight - genetics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics
Prevalence
Sex Characteristics
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
1) To estimate the heritability of body mass index (BMI) in twins aged 16y and 17y, with a special emphasis on gender-specific genetic effects and 2) to compare heights, weights, BMIs, and prevalences of 'overweight' (BMI > or = 25 kg/m2) in these twins and in singletons aged 16.5y.
Cross-sectional and longitudinal epidemiological questionnaire study of twins at ages 16y and 17 y, and cross-sectional study of singletons at age 16.5y.
BMI (kg/m2) was calculated from self-reported heights (m) and weights (kg).
4884 twins (2299 boys, 2585 girls) at baseline (age 16 y), 4401 twins (2002 boys, 2399 girls) at age 17 y, and 2509 singletons (1147 boys, 1362 girls) at age 16.5 y. Both twin and singleton samples are nationally representative.
At the ages of 16y and 17y, genetic effects accounted for over 80% of the interindividual variation of BMI. The correlations for male-female pairs were smaller than for either male-male or female-female dizygotic pairs. The singletons, especially the boys, had a higher BMI than the twins. Nine percent of singleton boys, but only 4-6% of twin boys and twin and singleton girls were 'overweight' (BMI > or = 25 kg/m2).
Among adolescents, genetic factors play a significant role in the causes of variation in BMI. The genetic modelling suggested that the sets of genes explaining the variation of BMI may differ in males and females. At this age, the twin boys, but not girls, seem to be leaner than singletons. Further follow-up will indicate whether these small differences disappear, and if not, what implications it might have to the generalizability of twin studies.
PubMed ID
10078843 View in PubMed
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Diversity of leisure-time sport activities in adolescence as a predictor of leisure-time physical activity in adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290743
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2017 Dec; 27(12):1902-1912
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Date
Dec-2017
Author
S Mäkelä
S Aaltonen
T Korhonen
R J Rose
J Kaprio
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2017 Dec; 27(12):1902-1912
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Exercise
Female
Finland
Humans
Leisure Activities
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Sports
Young Adult
Abstract
Because sustained physical activity is important for a healthy life, this paper examined whether a greater diversity of sport activities during adolescence predicts higher levels of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) in adulthood. From sport activity participation reported by 17-year-old twins, we formed five groups: 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5+ different sport activities. At follow-up in their mid-thirties, twins were divided into four activity classes based on LTPA, including active commuting. Multinomial regression analyses, adjusted for several confounders, were conducted separately for male (N=1288) and female (N=1770) participants. Further, conditional logistic regression analysis included 23 twin pairs discordant for both diversity of sport activities in adolescence and LTPA in adulthood. The diversity of leisure-time sport activities in adolescence had a significant positive association with adulthood LTPA among females. Membership in the most active adult quartile, compared to the least active quartile, was predicted by participation in 2, 3, 4, and 5+ sport activities in adolescence with odds ratios: 1.52 (P=.11), 1.86 (P=.02), 1.29 (P=.39), and 3.12 (P=5.4e-05), respectively. Within-pair analyses, limited by the small sample of twins discordant for both adolescent activities and adult outcomes, did not replicate the association. A greater diversity of leisure-time sport activities in adolescence predicts higher levels of LTPA in adulthood in females, but the causal nature of this association remains unresolved.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28106293 View in PubMed
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Drinking or abstaining at age 14? A genetic epidemiological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192532
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2001 Nov;25(11):1594-604
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
R J Rose
D M Dick
R J Viken
L. Pulkkinen
J. Kaprio
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA. rose@indiana.edu
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2001 Nov;25(11):1594-604
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - genetics
Alcoholism - epidemiology - genetics
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Questionnaires
Abstract
Regular drinking by age 14 years is a significant risk factor for alcoholism, and genetically informative data suggest that whether a young adolescent abstains or drinks is largely attributable to familial (or other shared) environmental factors.
Three consecutive birth cohorts of Finnish twins, enrolled into a longitudinal study at age 11 to 12 years, completed a follow-up questionnaire within 3 months of their 14th birthdays. The sample included 1380 twin sisters and 1330 twin brothers at age 14, and at that age, 35.4% reported using alcohol. Genetic analyses (model-fitting of twin pair data) and epidemiological analyses (logistical regressions of data from individual twins) were conducted to examine predictive factors of drinking versus abstinence at age 14.
Polychoric correlations were substantial across all same-sex twin pairs but were lower for brother-sister twins, suggesting significant influences of common environments, with some sex-specific effects. Common environmental effects were equivalent in male and female adolescents and accounted for 76% of the total variation in abstinence/drinking. Logistical regression analyses among 2206 individual twins with complete data on risk-relevant measures at both baseline and follow-up identified significant predictors of drinking or abstaining at age 14, including female sex, twin sibling of the opposite sex, accelerated pubertal development, and the twins' assessments, made at age 12, of reduced parental monitoring and a less supportive home atmosphere; drinking at age 14 was also predicted by behaviors rated by the twins' classroom teachers 2 years earlier, increasing with rated behavioral problems but decreasing with rated emotional problems.
Our results show that environmental factors shared by twin siblings account for most of the variance in abstaining or drinking at age 14. We identify predictors of drinking in the adolescent twins' home environments and in their dispositional behaviors, sibling interactions, and pubertal timing.
PubMed ID
11707634 View in PubMed
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Eating styles, overweight and obesity in young adult twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165476
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jul;61(7):822-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
A. Keski-Rahkonen
C M Bulik
K H Pietiläinen
R J Rose
J. Kaprio
A. Rissanen
Author Affiliation
Mailman School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. anna.keski-rahkonen@helsinki.fi
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jul;61(7):822-9
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Eating - physiology - psychology
Feeding Behavior - physiology - psychology
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Humans
Male
Obesity - etiology - genetics - psychology
Overweight
Prospective Studies
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
To explore the association of eating styles with overweight and obesity in young adults, controlling for identical genetic background in monozygotic twins.
Prospective twin cohort study.
Finland, 1991-2002.
Two-hundred and thirty-three women and 2060 men from the FinnTwin16 study, aged 16 years at baseline (T1), and ranging from 22 to 27 years at the time of the nutritional assessment (T4).
Eating styles (Restrictive/overeating, health-conscious, snacking, emotional and externally induced), self-reported at T4, were contrasted with body mass indices (BMIs) at T1 and T4.
At T4, obesity (BMI>or=30Kg/m(2)) was significantly cross-sectionally associated with restrictive eating, frequent snacks, eating in the evening, avoiding fatty foods and failure to maintain healthy eating patterns. These associations were independent of BMI at T1. Obese women self-reported more vulnerability to external eating cues and comfort eating than normal-weight women. However, in a multivariable model, only restrictive/overeating and health-conscious eating styles were significant correlates of obesity at T4, independent of gender and BMI at T1. When we controlled for genetic background restricting the analysis to the 39 female and 45 male monozygotic twin pairs discordant for obesity or overweight (BMI>or=25Kg/m(2)), restrictive/overeating eating style was still statistically significantly associated with excess weight.
The eating styles of obese young adults differ from their normal-weight counterparts: restrictive eating, overeating and fewer healthy food choices are associated with obesity. Different eating styles may partially explain weight differences in individuals with identical genetic background.
PubMed ID
17251930 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.