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51 records – page 1 of 6.

14-year outcome in early schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248211
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1978 Oct;58(4):327-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1978
Author
R C Bland
H. Orn
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1978 Oct;58(4):327-38
Date
Oct-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Canada
Female
Fertility
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Marriage
Prognosis
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - mortality
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Of 45 first admission schizophrenics from 1963, an incidence by first admission group for northern Alberta, 43 were followed-up 14 years later. Based on these figures the expectancy was found to be 0.49%. The proportion of patients who were married was less than expected in comparison with the general population, but amongst the married, fertility was probably comparable to the population's. At follow-up about half the patients were managing well with little or no disability, one quarter had moderate to marked disability and the remainder were socially, psychiatrically and occupationally disabled. From the time of first admission, patients had spent an average of 15% of their time in hospital and lost 28% of the total time due to psychiatric disability.
PubMed ID
717003 View in PubMed
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Age and remission of psychiatric disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207575
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1997 Sep;42(7):722-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
R C Bland
S C Newman
H. Orn
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1997 Sep;42(7):722-9
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alberta - epidemiology
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Personality Assessment
Sex Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To examine the relationship between remission of psychiatric disorders and age.
We interviewed 3258 randomly selected adult residents of Edmonton using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS), which yielded DIS/DSM-III diagnoses. Remission was defined as being free of symptoms of the index lifetime disorder in the year preceding the interview, this being the difference between the lifetime and one-year prevalence. For each age group, the proportion of cases with and without symptoms in the preceding year was calculated. Numbers and proportions of cases were estimated after adjusting to the census population and weighting for household size. Only the more common disorders were examined; any comorbidities were ignored.
Drug abuse or dependence, antisocial personality disorder (in both sexes), and alcohol abuse or dependence (in men) all showed remission rates that increased with age. Panic disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) showed a decreased likelihood of remission with increasing age. Major depression and phobias showed little tendency to remission with age. Considering all disorders together, the one-year remission rate for all ages combined was only 33.2%, with a tendency for lower remission rates to be found in those aged 55 to 64.
As may be expected, antisocial personality, drug abuse or dependence, and alcohol abuse or dependence tend to show increased remission rates with increasing age. In OCD and panic disorder, the low rates of remission found in all age groups indicate that these disorders produce significant long-term morbidity. For depression, which had an overall remission rate of less than 50%, the stable low rate of remission probably indicates not only the difficulties of treatment but also the low rates at which cases get treated.
PubMed ID
9307832 View in PubMed
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Age of onset of psychiatric disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234069
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1988;338:43-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
R C Bland
S C Newman
H. Orn
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1988;338:43-9
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alberta
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - psychology
Phobic Disorders - psychology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Abstract
Age of onset of psychiatric disorders was determined from a random sample of 3,258 household residents who were administered the DIS by trained lay interviewers. Onset was determined by the subject's recall of the age of the first symptom in those who met lifetime criteria for a diagnosis (DSM III without exclusions). The peak age of risk for most disorders was from the teens to 30 years, however a number of schizophrenics showed first symptoms before age 10. Few cases of any disorder had an onset in old age. The ages of onset are generally lower than those usually given from series of treated or hospitalized cases.
PubMed ID
3165594 View in PubMed
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Alcoholism--North America and Asia. A comparison of population surveys with the Diagnostic Interview Schedule.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229351
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1990 Apr;47(4):313-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
J E Helzer
G J Canino
E K Yeh
R C Bland
C K Lee
H G Hwu
S. Newman
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110.
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1990 Apr;47(4):313-9
Date
Apr-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alberta
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Catchment Area (Health)
Child
Comorbidity
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Korea
Male
Middle Aged
Missouri
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Puerto Rico
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Taiwan
Abstract
The Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS) is a highly structured instrument that enables lay examiners to gather the clinical information necessary to generate psychiatric disorders according to the DSM-III, Feighner, and Research Diagnostic Criteria. It was developed originally as the diagnostic interview for the Epidemiologic Catchment Area (ECA) survey. Because it adheres to DSM-III and can be used by lay interviewers, thus making it practical for studies involving large samples, it has been used for other population surveys in North and South America, Europe, and Asia. This investigation compares the epidemiology of DSM-III-defined alcohol abuse and addiction in DIS-based population surveys cross-nationally (in St Louis, Mo; Edmonton, Canada; Puerto Rico; Taipei City, Taiwan; and South Korea). We found considerable variation in the lifetime prevalence of alcoholism but a similarity in the age of onset, the symptomatic expression, and the associated risk factors. We also found an inverse correlation between the prevalence of alcoholism and the strength of the association of the risk factors we examined. The work described herein demonstrates the utility of consistent definition and method in cross-cultural psychiatric research. The substantive findings have implications for the definition of alcoholism and for a better understanding of genetic and environmental interactions in its etiology.
PubMed ID
2322082 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Dec;29(8):687-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1984
Author
R C Bland
H. Orn
B. Sinha
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Dec;29(8):687-92
Date
Dec-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alberta
Female
Health status
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Social Change
Social Environment
Social Mobility
Social Problems
Abstract
Population surveys were conducted, examining nonpsychotic psychiatric symptoms, life events, and problems in community living in Primrose, a community experiencing rapid growth in anticipation of the construction of a heavy oil extraction plant, and in Wolf Creek, a stable rural town. Psychiatric symptom levels were lower in the boom town than in Wolf Creek, but the Primrose symptom levels were comparable to those in Saskatchewan. More life events were experienced by Primrose residents who, despite lower symptom levels, had seen their physician more often for minor illnesses. The complaints about living in the town of Primrose matched those of boom town residents from elsewhere. There was no evidence to support the popular view that living in a boom town creates more nonpsychotic psychiatric symptomatology. The higher proportion of the boom town population using physician services for minor illnesses, the higher level of life events reported, and the high frequency of reported problems for families living in the boom town support suggestions that stress is associated with these conditions.
PubMed ID
6518443 View in PubMed
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Canadian trends in mortality from mental disorders, 1965-1983.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235003
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1987 Jul;76(1):1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1987
Author
S C Newman
R C Bland
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1987 Jul;76(1):1-7
Date
Jul-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcoholism - mortality
Canada
Dementia - mortality
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - mortality
Middle Aged
Psychoses, Alcoholic - mortality
Abstract
This report describes trends in the death rate for all mental disorders, presenile and senile dementia, and alcoholic psychoses and alcohol abuse/dependence in Canada for the period 1965-1983. It is demonstrated that overall there has been an increase in the death rate for each of these causes of mortality, both for males and females, and that in the case of presenile and senile dementia the increase has been particularly rapid. The older age groups appear to be contributing most to the observed changes. Conjectures are made as to the underlying reasons for the observed trends.
PubMed ID
3630745 View in PubMed
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Demographic aspects of functional psychoses in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249946
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1977 May;55(5):369-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1977
Author
R C Bland
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1977 May;55(5):369-80
Date
May-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affective Disorders, Psychotic - epidemiology
Age Factors
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Demography
Female
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Marriage
Middle Aged
Paranoid Disorders - epidemiology
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Sex ratio
Abstract
Canadian national data for functional psychoses (classified as schizophrenia, effective psychoses, paranoid states and reactive psychoses) are analyzed for age, sex, marital status, expectancy for first admissions and length of stay for discharges. Differences are found such that each psychosis can be distinguished from the others, thus providing indirect evidence supporting the use of the different diagnoses. The demographic characteristics of reactive psychoses from North American data have not been previously described, and are found to be similar to Scandinavian descriptions. Sex ratios for subgroup diagnoses whow similarities between catatonic schizophrenics, manic (bipolar) affectives, and reactive psychoses. Schizoaffective psychoses resemble affectives more than schizophrenia, and paraphrenia is similar to affectives. Total expectancies for functional psychosis (4.4% for males, 5.5% for females) are similar to Scandinavian figures, but the distribution by diagnosis differs, perhaps representing different diagnostic practices, but generally similar sex ratios and high rates in single persons are found.
PubMed ID
868568 View in PubMed
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Design and field methods of the Edmonton survey of psychiatric disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234072
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1988;338:17-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
H. Orn
S C Newman
R C Bland
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1988;338:17-23
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Data Collection - methods
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Research Design
Abstract
This paper describes aspects of the study design and field methods used in a survey of psychiatric disorders carried out in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Between January 1983 and May 1986, information was gathered on 3,258 community residents using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule and the General Health Questionnaire - 30 item version. The survey had a response rate of 71.6%. The nature of the sampling strategy used, features of the study instruments chosen, the selection and training of interviewers, and the approach to data analysis are briefly described.
PubMed ID
3165591 View in PubMed
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The efficiency of two-phase designs in prevalence surveys of mental disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103235
Source
Psychol Med. 1990 Feb;20(1):183-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1990
Author
S C Newman
P E Shrout
R C Bland
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Psychol Med. 1990 Feb;20(1):183-93
Date
Feb-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Models, Statistical
Personality Tests
Sampling Studies
Abstract
A two-phase survey of mental disorders uses a screening test to identify possible cases, thereby reducing the resources devoted to interviewing those not having the condition of interest. It is demonstrated using a mathematical model that in situations likely to be encountered in practice a two-phase design may lead to an increase in the efficiency of prevalence rate estimation, and also to an improvement in the efficiency of case detection. However, in certain applications the modest gain in efficiency may not warrant the additional complexity of a two-phase approach to data collection. Data from a survey of mental disorders in Edmonton, Canada, which collected information on 3258 community residents using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule and the General Health Questionnaire, are used to demonstrate how two-phase methods would have changed the efficiency of an actual survey.
Notes
Erratum In: Psychol Med 1990 Aug;20(3):following 745
PubMed ID
2242109 View in PubMed
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Electroconvulsive therapy in a major teaching hospital: diagnoses and indications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238722
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1985 Jun;30(4):288-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1985
Author
R C Bland
S. Brintnell
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1985 Jun;30(4):288-92
Date
Jun-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Electroconvulsive Therapy - standards
Female
Hospitals, University - standards
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - standards
Abstract
The use of ECT over an eleven year period in the University of Alberta Hospitals is reviewed. Five percent of patients received ECT, the mean number of treatments per course was 5.2, and the most frequent type of treatment was bilateral ECT. Discharge diagnoses showed that three-quarters of the patients had affective psychoses and one-fifth were schizophrenic. All patients had had a mandatory consultation before treatment and the most frequent reasons for choosing ECT were given as: failed antidepressant treatment, previous good response to ECT, failure to respond to other treatment, uncontrollable delusions or psychotic behavior, acute suicidal risk requiring a rapid response, and adverse reaction to medication. The mandatory consultation process has worked well and has helped to clarify the situations where ECT may be used with benefit. It is hoped that this may assist those who may be responsible for defining guidelines for the use of ECT.
PubMed ID
4016666 View in PubMed
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51 records – page 1 of 6.