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Amount and type of alcohol consumption and missing teeth among community-dwelling older adults: findings from the Copenhagen Oral Health Senior study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127155
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Karen Heegaard
Kirsten Avlund
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Ulla A Hvidtfeldt
Allan Bardow
Morten Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. karen.heegaard@mail.tele.dk
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - classification - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Population Surveillance
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To study if an association between total weekly intake of alcohol, type-specific weekly alcohol intake, alcoholic beverage preference, and the number of teeth among older people exists.
A cross-sectional study including a total of 783 community-dwelling men and women aged 65-95 years who were interviewed about alcohol drinking habits and underwent a clinical oral and dental examination. Multiple regression analyses were applied for studying the association between total weekly alcohol consumption, beverage-specific alcohol consumption, beverage preference (defined as the highest intake of one beverage type compared with two other types), and the number of remaining teeth (= 20 versus >20 remaining teeth).
The odds ratio (OR) of having a low number of teeth decreased with the total intake of alcohol in women, with ORs for a low number of teeth of 0.40 [95 percent confidence interval (CI) 0.22-0.76] in women drinking 1-14 drinks per week and 0.34 (95 percent CI 0.16-0.74) in women with an intake of more than 14 drinks per week compared with abstainers. Similar relations could also be obtained for type-specific alcohol intake of wine and for wine and spirits preference among women. Men who preferred beer showed a decreased risk for a low number of teeth compared with men with other alcohol preferences.
In this study, alcohol consumption, wine drinking, and wine and spirits preference among women were associated with a higher number of teeth compared with abstainers. Among men, those who preferred beer also had a higher number of teeth.
PubMed ID
22320290 View in PubMed
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Findings from the oral health study of the Danish Health Examination Survey 2007-2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114308
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 Nov;71(6):1560-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Johanne Kongstad
Kim Ekstrand
Vibeke Qvist
Lisa Bøge Christensen
Birthe Cortsen
Morten Grønbaek
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Palle Holmstrup
Allan Bardow
Svante Twetman
Nils-Erik Fiehn
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen , Copenhagen N , Denmark.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 Nov;71(6):1560-9
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Young Adult
Abstract
The aims of the oral part of the Danish Health Examination Survey (DANHES 2007-2008) were (1) to establish an oral health database for adult Danes and (2) to explore the influence of general diseases and lifestyle on oral health. This paper presents the study population, examination methods, questionnaire and baseline results.
The study population comprised 4402 subjects, aged 18-96, consecutively enrolled from 18 065 DANHES participants from 13 municipalities in Denmark. The oral part consisted of a validated questionnaire and a clinical examination, carried out in mobile units by three trained and calibrated dental hygienists. The data were processed with descriptive statistics and mono- and bivariate analyses.
The mean age was 54.1 years and 60% were women. The mean number of natural teeth was 26.6; the mean DMFT/DMFS values were 18.9 and 61.0, and varied with age (DMFT 8.7-24.3). A higher proportion of females suffered from dental erosion in the younger age groups. Forty per cent of all subjects had a mean clinical attachment loss = 3 mm, varying from 4% among those aged 18-34 to 80% in those over 75. A sub-optimal saliva secretion rate was more common among females than males (17.7% vs 10.4%) and this was reflected by the reported frequency of dry mouth.
This extensive cross-sectional study provides a platform for obtaining future knowledge of the impact of health- and lifestyle-related factors on oral diseases. The validated questionnaire and the clinical characteristics enable robust analyses, although the conclusions may be hampered by limited external validity.
PubMed ID
23627881 View in PubMed
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Intakes of calcium, vitamin D, and dairy servings and dental plaque in older Danish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261485
Source
Nutr J. 2013;12:61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Amanda Ra Adegboye
Lisa B Christensen
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Kirsten Avlund
Barbara J Boucher
Berit L Heitmann
Source
Nutr J. 2013;12:61
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dairy Products
Denmark - epidemiology
Dental Plaque - diagnosis - epidemiology
Dietary Supplements
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Questionnaires
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
To investigate whether intakes of calcium and dairy-servings within-recommendations were associated with plaque score when allowing for vitamin D intakes.
In this cross-sectional study, including 606 older Danish adults, total dietary calcium intake (mg/day) was classified as below vs. within-recommendations and dairy intake as
Notes
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PubMed ID
23680488 View in PubMed
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Midlife Cognitive Ability, Education, and Tooth Loss in Older Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283951
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2017 Jan;65(1):194-199
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Kristine Harrsen Bachkati
Erik Lykke Mortensen
Henrik Brønnum-Hansen
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2017 Jan;65(1):194-199
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cognition
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - epidemiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine the possible influence of cognitive ability and education at age 50 or 60 on number of teeth at age 70.
Community-dwelling population in Copenhagen, Denmark.
Men and women born in 1914 (N = 302).
Cognitive ability was assessed using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale at age 50 or 60. A global cognitive ability measure was used as a continuous measure and according to tertile. Information on education was gathered using a questionnaire at age 50 or 60. A clinical oral examination took place at age 70, and oral health was measured according to number of teeth (
PubMed ID
28111753 View in PubMed
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Smoking and drinking as risk indicators for tooth loss in middle-aged Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104851
Source
J Aging Health. 2014 Feb;26(1):54-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Douglas E Morse
Kirsten Avlund
Lisa Bøge Christensen
Nils-Erik Fiehn
Drude Molbo
Palle Holmstrup
Johanne Kongstad
Erik Lykke Mortensen
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Author Affiliation
University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Aging Health. 2014 Feb;26(1):54-71
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
To investigate tobacco and alcohol consumption as risk indicators for missing teeth in late middle-aged Danes.
In all, 1,517 Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank (CAMB) participants received a clinical oral examination that included number of teeth. Information on smoking, drinking, and various covariates was obtained using self-administered, structured questionnaires. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression (dependent variable: 6+ vs. 15 tobacco units/day, and persons who had smoked for 27+ years had elevated mean scores of missing teeth and associated odds ratios (OR) compared with never smokers. Relative to nondrinkers, alcohol consumption was associated with reduced odds of missing 6+ teeth.
Our findings suggest that smoking is positively associated, while alcoholic beverage consumption is inversely related to tooth loss in middle-aged Danes.
PubMed ID
24584260 View in PubMed
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Social position and health in old age: the relevance of different indicators of social position.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62793
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(2):126-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Kirsten Avlund
Bjørn E Holstein
Merete Osler
Mogens T Damsgaard
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Niels K Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3, 2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark. K.Avlund@socmed.ku.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(2):126-36
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Status Indicators
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews
Male
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Oral Health
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
AIMS: An analysis was undertaken to investigate social inequalities in health among old men and women in relation to five indicators of social position. METHODS: The study is based on a population-based cross-sectional survey among 748 75-year-old men and women, which was performed as clinical examinations and interviews in 1989 in Glostrup, a suburban area west of Copenhagen. Social position was measured by vocational education, occupation, social class, income, and housing tenure. Health was measured by number of chronic diseases, tiredness in relation to mobility, need of help in relation to mobility, oral health (number of teeth), and well-being (the CES-D Scale). The statistical analysis included bivariate contingency tables and logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Two material wealth variables (income and tenure) were consistently related to nearly all health measures while the relationships between the other social position variables and health showed no consistent patterns. Multiple logistic regression analyses with tenure and income as independent variables and each of the health variables as dependent variables and control for education and occupation showed different patterns for men and women. In men the odds ratios of housing tenure on four health variables were strong and unaffected by education and occupation while in women the odds ratios of income on three health variables were strong and unaffected by education and occupation. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates strong, consistent associations between variables of material wealth indicators and various measures of health among 75-year-old men and women.
PubMed ID
12745763 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.