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Amount and type of alcohol consumption and missing teeth among community-dwelling older adults: findings from the Copenhagen Oral Health Senior study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127155
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Karen Heegaard
Kirsten Avlund
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Ulla A Hvidtfeldt
Allan Bardow
Morten Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. karen.heegaard@mail.tele.dk
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - classification - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Population Surveillance
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To study if an association between total weekly intake of alcohol, type-specific weekly alcohol intake, alcoholic beverage preference, and the number of teeth among older people exists.
A cross-sectional study including a total of 783 community-dwelling men and women aged 65-95 years who were interviewed about alcohol drinking habits and underwent a clinical oral and dental examination. Multiple regression analyses were applied for studying the association between total weekly alcohol consumption, beverage-specific alcohol consumption, beverage preference (defined as the highest intake of one beverage type compared with two other types), and the number of remaining teeth (= 20 versus >20 remaining teeth).
The odds ratio (OR) of having a low number of teeth decreased with the total intake of alcohol in women, with ORs for a low number of teeth of 0.40 [95 percent confidence interval (CI) 0.22-0.76] in women drinking 1-14 drinks per week and 0.34 (95 percent CI 0.16-0.74) in women with an intake of more than 14 drinks per week compared with abstainers. Similar relations could also be obtained for type-specific alcohol intake of wine and for wine and spirits preference among women. Men who preferred beer showed a decreased risk for a low number of teeth compared with men with other alcohol preferences.
In this study, alcohol consumption, wine drinking, and wine and spirits preference among women were associated with a higher number of teeth compared with abstainers. Among men, those who preferred beer also had a higher number of teeth.
PubMed ID
22320290 View in PubMed
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Assessing caries increments in elderly patients with and without dementia: a one-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147589
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2009 Nov;140(11):1392-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Birita Ellefsen
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Douglas E Morse
Marianne Schroll
Birgitte Bo Andersen
Gunhild Waldemar
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Center, School of Dentistry, University of Copenhagen, Norre Allé 20, Copenhagen DK-2200 CPH N, Denmark. bel@odont.ku.dk
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2009 Nov;140(11):1392-400
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - complications
Case-Control Studies
DMF Index
Dementia - complications
Denmark
Dental Caries - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
The authors conducted a study to determine one-year coronal and root caries increments in patients newly diagnosed as having Alzheimer disease (AD), other dementia (OD) or no dementia.
The authors recruited patients from two hospital memory clinics in Copenhagen. The oral examination included an assessment of dental status and dental caries. The authors used a structured questionnaire to obtain information regarding demographic, social and functional variables.
In the baseline study, 106 dentate patients participated. Of these, 77 completed the follow-up study. The participants' mean age was 81.9 years at baseline and 82.5 years at follow-up. At baseline, 87 (82 percent) of 106 participants had dementia and at follow-up, 64 (83 percent) of 77 participants had dementia. The mean number of decayed tooth surfaces was significantly higher at follow-up than at baseline for all participants, and the number was highest for the OD group. The one-year adjusted caries and filling increments (ADJCIs) were high for participants with and without dementia but were highest for participants in the AD and OD groups. Baseline risk factors for developing elevated coronal and root ADJCIs included having caries, having many teeth and being older than 80 years.
Elderly people referred to a memory clinic were at an elevated risk of developing high levels of coronal and root-surface caries during the first year after referral, and those with a dementia diagnosis other than AD appeared to be at a particularly high risk of developing multiple carious lesions during the first year after diagnosis.
These findings underscore the importance of addressing the oral health needs of elderly people suspected of having experienced cognitive decline.
PubMed ID
19884398 View in PubMed
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The Copenhagen Oral Health Senior Cohort: design, population and dental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138774
Source
Gerodontology. 2011 Sep;28(3):165-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Karen M Heegaard
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Allan Bardow
Ulla A Hvidtfeldt
Morten Grønbaek
Kirsten Avlund
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Centre, School of Dentistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Gerodontology. 2011 Sep;28(3):165-76
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cuspid - pathology
Denmark
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Incisor - pathology
Income - statistics & numerical data
Male
Marital status
Motor Activity
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Oral Health
Polypharmacy
Refusal to Participate - statistics & numerical data
Root Caries - epidemiology
Saliva - secretion
Secretory Rate - physiology
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Tooth Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
In order to study the way old age influence oral health, the Copenhagen Oral Health Senior Cohort (COHS) has been established.
To describe the design, measurement procedures, and baseline values for COHS including spatial distribution of restorations and dental caries as well as reasons for non-participation.
Seven hundred and eighty-three individuals aged 65 years or older, from a total of 1918 invited elderly people, underwent an interview regarding oral health-related behaviour and a clinical oral examination including measurement of unstimulated whole saliva flow rate.
Twelve percent of the COHS was edentulous. The number of dental restorations was higher for women compared to men; however, men had more caries than women. Coronal caries was most frequent on mesial and distal surfaces and on the maxillary incisors and canines; root caries was most frequent on labial surfaces and evenly distributed within the dentition. Only 41% of all invited elderly people accepted the invitation, with old age and poor health being the primary reasons for non-participation.
The baseline values for COHS show that a substantial proportion of the participants had retained a natural dentition and that dental caries was prevalent with the anterior maxillary teeth being most affected.
PubMed ID
21138466 View in PubMed
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Dental care for aging populations in Denmark, Sweden, Norway, United kingdom, and Germany.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62755
Source
J Dent Educ. 2005 Sep;69(9):987-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Merete Vigild
Ina Nitschke
Douglas B Berkey
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Center, School of Dentistry, University of Copenhagen, Norre Alle 20, DK-2200, Copenhagen N, Denmark. php@odont.ku.dk
Source
J Dent Educ. 2005 Sep;69(9):987-97
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Dental Care for Aged - economics - psychology - utilization
Dental Health Services - utilization
Geriatric Dentistry - education
Germany
Great Britain
Health Services Accessibility
Health status
Humans
Scandinavia
Social Environment
United States
Abstract
This article reviews access to and financing of dental care for aging populations in selected nations in Europe. Old age per se does not seem to be a major factor in determining the use of dental services. Dentition status, on the other hand, is a major determinant of dental attendance. In addition to perceived need, a variety of social and behavioral factors as well as general health factors have been identified as determinants of dental service use. Frail and functionally dependent elderly have special difficulties in accessing dental care; private dental practitioners are hesitant to provide dental care to these patients. One reason may be that the fee for treating these patients is too low, considering high dental office expenses. Another reason may be problems related to management of medically compromised patients. This raises an important question: does inadequate training in geriatric dentistry discourage dentists from seeking opportunities to treat geriatric patients? Overall, the availability of dental services, the organization of the dental health care delivery system, and price subsidy for dental treatment are important factors influencing access to dental care among older people in Europe as well as in the United States.
PubMed ID
16141084 View in PubMed
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Dental caries in persons over the age of 80 living in Kungsholmen, Sweden: findings from the KEOHS project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52200
Source
Community Dent Health. 2002 Dec;19(4):262-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Douglas E Morse
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Jytte Holm-Pedersen
Ralph V Katz
Matti Viitanen
Eva von Strauss
Bengt Winblad
Author Affiliation
New York University College of Dentistry, Department of Epidemiology & Health Promotion, New York 10010, USA. dem5@nyu.edu
Source
Community Dent Health. 2002 Dec;19(4):262-7
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - epidemiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Prevalence
Root Caries - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Statistics
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The Kungsholmen Elders Oral Health Study (KEOHS) evaluated the oral health status of generally healthy, community-dwelling persons over the age of 80 living in Kungsholmen, an area in central Stockholm. This paper reports findings regarding the prevalence and severity of dental caries among the dentate participants. BASIC RESEARCH DESIGN: Caries examinations were conducted on eligible persons participating in the Kungsholmen Project, an ongoing, longitudinal study of older adults. SETTING: Caries examinations were carried out between 1994 and 1996 at two local clinics by three standardised examiners using defined visual, tactile criteria. PARTICIPANTS: Among 296 potentially eligible participants, 159 were examined, and a total of 129 had at least one tooth. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The caries examination identified decayed and filled surfaces and missing teeth. RESULTS: Of the dentate subjects examined, 80% had teeth in both arches; 98% had at least one coronal filling; 81% had one or more restored root surfaces. Depending upon age and gender, between 36% and 56% of those examined had untreated coronal caries, and between 54% and 75% had untreated root caries. CONCLUSIONS: These findings document the substantial and ongoing impact of dental caries in a sample of generally healthy, community-dwelling older adults and underscore the importance of continued caries prevention and treatment in the aged.
PubMed ID
12489842 View in PubMed
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Dental caries, periodontal disease, and cardiac arrhythmias in community-dwelling older persons aged 80 and older: is there a link?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53192
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Mar;53(3):430-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Kirsten Avlund
Douglas E Morse
Kaj Stoltze
Ralph V Katz
Matti Viitanen
Bengt Winblad
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Center, University of Copenhagen, School of Dentistry, Copenhagen, Denmark. php@odont.ku.dk
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Mar;53(3):430-7
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arrhythmia - complications - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Dental Caries - complications - epidemiology
Female
Geriatrics
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Periodontal Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To examine whether caries or periodontitis is associated with cardiac arrhythmias in community-dwelling people aged 80 and older. SETTING: Urban, community-based population in Stockholm, Sweden. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. PARTICIPANTS: Eligible persons were identified through the Kungsholmen Project, which is an ongoing, longitudinal, population-based study of the oldest old. The present study included 125 dentate individuals. MEASUREMENTS: Data from interviews, a medical examination, and an oral examination. The assessment of cardiac arrhythmia was based on a clinical examination by a physician or the Stockholm Inpatient Register. Active root caries, active coronal caries, and periodontitis were assessed using previously defined National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: The primary finding of the multivariate logistic regression analysis was that persons with three or more active root caries lesions had more than twice the odds of cardiac arrhythmias than persons without active root caries. The results did not notably change after adjusting for age, medications that reduce saliva, and number of teeth. Persons with one to two active coronal caries lesions had 2.8 times higher odds (95% confidence interval=1.1-7.0) of arrhythmia than persons without active coronal caries, but there was no greater risk for persons with three or more coronal caries lesions. There was no association between periodontal disease and arrhythmia. CONCLUSION: The findings indicate that there may be a link between active root caries and cardiac arrhythmias in the oldest old. Nevertheless, although a biological pathway is not obvious, it is plausible that both are simply markers of declining general health. The results suggest the need for further study of these relationships.
PubMed ID
15743285 View in PubMed
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Findings from the oral health study of the Danish Health Examination Survey 2007-2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114308
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 Nov;71(6):1560-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Johanne Kongstad
Kim Ekstrand
Vibeke Qvist
Lisa Bøge Christensen
Birthe Cortsen
Morten Grønbaek
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Palle Holmstrup
Allan Bardow
Svante Twetman
Nils-Erik Fiehn
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen , Copenhagen N , Denmark.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 Nov;71(6):1560-9
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Young Adult
Abstract
The aims of the oral part of the Danish Health Examination Survey (DANHES 2007-2008) were (1) to establish an oral health database for adult Danes and (2) to explore the influence of general diseases and lifestyle on oral health. This paper presents the study population, examination methods, questionnaire and baseline results.
The study population comprised 4402 subjects, aged 18-96, consecutively enrolled from 18 065 DANHES participants from 13 municipalities in Denmark. The oral part consisted of a validated questionnaire and a clinical examination, carried out in mobile units by three trained and calibrated dental hygienists. The data were processed with descriptive statistics and mono- and bivariate analyses.
The mean age was 54.1 years and 60% were women. The mean number of natural teeth was 26.6; the mean DMFT/DMFS values were 18.9 and 61.0, and varied with age (DMFT 8.7-24.3). A higher proportion of females suffered from dental erosion in the younger age groups. Forty per cent of all subjects had a mean clinical attachment loss = 3 mm, varying from 4% among those aged 18-34 to 80% in those over 75. A sub-optimal saliva secretion rate was more common among females than males (17.7% vs 10.4%) and this was reflected by the reported frequency of dry mouth.
This extensive cross-sectional study provides a platform for obtaining future knowledge of the impact of health- and lifestyle-related factors on oral diseases. The validated questionnaire and the clinical characteristics enable robust analyses, although the conclusions may be hampered by limited external validity.
PubMed ID
23627881 View in PubMed
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Indicators for root caries in Danish persons with recently diagnosed Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124867
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Sep;29(3):194-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Birita S Ellefsen
Douglas E Morse
Gunhild Waldemar
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Center, School of Dentistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Sep;29(3):194-202
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - complications
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Prevalence
Risk factors
Root Caries - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
To identify indicators of root caries among persons with newly diagnosed Alzheimer's disease (AD).
Few studies have investigated dental caries in older adults with AD. Previously we found that persons with AD had significantly more root caries compared to persons with dementia other than AD.
Participants were recruited from two university hospital clinics in Copenhagen, Denmark. A team of neurologists/geriatricians carried out the diagnostic screening. The study included an interview, oral examination and medical records.
We evaluated potential indicators of root decay across subjects with 3+ decayed surfaces vs.
PubMed ID
22540768 View in PubMed
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Intakes of calcium, vitamin D, and dairy servings and dental plaque in older Danish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261485
Source
Nutr J. 2013;12:61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Amanda Ra Adegboye
Lisa B Christensen
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Kirsten Avlund
Barbara J Boucher
Berit L Heitmann
Source
Nutr J. 2013;12:61
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dairy Products
Denmark - epidemiology
Dental Plaque - diagnosis - epidemiology
Dietary Supplements
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Questionnaires
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
To investigate whether intakes of calcium and dairy-servings within-recommendations were associated with plaque score when allowing for vitamin D intakes.
In this cross-sectional study, including 606 older Danish adults, total dietary calcium intake (mg/day) was classified as below vs. within-recommendations and dairy intake as
Notes
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PubMed ID
23680488 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.