Skip header and navigation

Refine By

32 records – page 1 of 4.

Adolescent cannabis use, baseline prodromal symptoms and the risk of psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301353
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2018 04; 212(4):227-233
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Antti Mustonen
Solja Niemelä
Tanja Nordström
Graham K Murray
Pirjo Mäki
Erika Jääskeläinen
Jouko Miettunen
Author Affiliation
Center for Life Course Health Research,University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland and Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu,Oulu,Finland.
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2018 04; 212(4):227-233
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Marijuana Use - epidemiology
Prodromal Symptoms
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
The association between cannabis use and the risk of psychosis has been studied extensively but the temporal order still remains controversial. Aims To examine the association between cannabis use in adolescence and the risk of psychosis after adjustment for prodromal symptoms and other potential confounders.
The sample (n = 6534) was composed of the prospective general population-based Northern Finland Birth Cohort of 1986. Information on prodromal symptoms of psychosis and cannabis use was collected using questionnaires at age 15-16 years. Participants were followed up for ICD-10 psychotic disorders until age 30 years using nationwide registers.
The risk of psychosis was elevated in individuals who had tried cannabis five times or more (hazard ratio, (HR) = 6.5, 95% CI 3.0-13.9). The association remained statistically significant even when adjusted for prodromal symptoms, other substance use and parental psychosis (HR = 3.0, 95% CI 1.1-8.0).
Adolescent cannabis use is associated with increased risk of psychosis even after adjustment for baseline prodromal symptoms, parental psychosis and other substance use. Declaration of interest None.
PubMed ID
29557758 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ante- and perinatal circumstances and risk of attempted suicides and suicides in offspring: the Northern Finland birth cohort 1966 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127072
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 Nov;47(11):1783-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Antti Alaräisänen
Jouko Miettunen
Anneli Pouta
Matti Isohanni
Pirkko Räsänen
Pirjo Mäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, 90014 Oulu, Finland. antti.alaraisanen@oulu.fi
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 Nov;47(11):1783-94
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Family Characteristics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Age
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unwanted - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Single Parent - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Physiological
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate those ante- and perinatal circumstances preceding suicide attempts and suicides, which have so far not been studied intensively.
Examination of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (n = 10,742), originally based on antenatal questionnaire data and now followed up from mid-pregnancy to age 39, to ascertain psychiatric disorders in the parents and offspring and suicides or attempted suicides in the offspring using nationwide registers.
A total of 121 suicide attempts (57 males) and 69 suicides (56 males) had occurred. Previously unstudied antenatal factors (maternal depressed mood and smoking, unwanted pregnancy) were not related to these after adjustment. Psychiatric disorders in the parents and offspring were the risk factors in both genders. When adjusted for these, the statistically significant risk factors among males were a single-parent family for suicide attempts (OR 3.71, 95% CI 1.62-8.50) and grand multiparity for suicides (OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.15-6.18). When a psychiatric disorder in females was included among possible risk factors for suicide attempts, it alone remained significant (OR 15.55, 8.78-27.53).
A single-parent family was a risk factor for attempted suicides and grand multiparity for suicides in male offspring even after adjusting for other ante- and perinatal circumstances and mental disorders in the parents and offspring. Mothers' antenatal depressed mood and smoking and unwanted pregnancy did not increase the risk of suicide, which is a novel finding.
PubMed ID
22327374 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association Between Clinical Signs of Temporomandibular Disorders and Psychological Distress Among an Adult Finnish Population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269758
Source
J Oral Facial Pain Headache. 2015;29(4):370-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Lauri Tuuliainen
Kirsi Sipilä
Pirjo Mäki
Mauno Könönen
Anna Liisa Suominen
Source
J Oral Facial Pain Headache. 2015;29(4):370-7
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Facial Pain - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Masticatory Muscles - pathology
Middle Aged
Myalgia - epidemiology
Palpation
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
To evaluate the association between signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and psychological distress in a general population-based sample of Finnish adults.
The Health 2000 Survey was conducted in 2000-2001 by the National Institute for Health and Welfare in Finland. Of the sample of adults aged 30 or over (n=8,028), 79% participated in a clinical oral health examination, which included examination of TMD signs. The participants (n=6,155) also completed questionnaires, including the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), which measured psychological distress. Associations between TMD signs and psychological distress measured by the GHQ-12 were examined in both genders. Statistical measures included chi-square tests, t tests, and logistic regression analyses.
The prevalence of the TMD signs (limited opening, clicking, crepitation, temporomandibular joint [TMJ] palpation pain, and muscle palpation pain) was 11.2%, 17.6%, 10.5%, 5.1%, and 18.9% in women, and 6.1%, 12.9%, 5.3%, 2.4%, and 7.2% in men, respectively. High GHQ-12 scores, measured as continuous variables and in quartiles by distress level, were significantly associated with masticatory muscle pain on palpation in both genders (P
PubMed ID
26485384 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between Dopamine Receptor D2 (DRD2) Variations rs6277 and rs1800497 and Cognitive Performance According to Risk Type for Psychosis: A Nested Case Control Study in a Finnish Population Sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264202
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(6):e0127602
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Hugh Ramsay
Jennifer H Barnett
Jouko Miettunen
Sari Mukkala
Pirjo Mäki
Johanna Liuhanen
Graham K Murray
Marjo-Riitta Jarvelin
Hanna Ollila
Tiina Paunio
Juha Veijola
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(6):e0127602
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
There is limited research regarding the association between genes and cognitive intermediate phenotypes in those at risk for psychotic disorders.
We measured the association between established psychosis risk variants in dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) and cognitive performance in individuals at age 23 years and explored if associations between cognition and these variants differed according to the presence of familial or clinical risk for psychosis. The subjects of the Oulu Brain and Mind Study were drawn from the general population-based Northern Finland 1986 Birth Cohort (NFBC 1986). Using linear regression, we compared the associations between cognitive performance and two candidate DRD2 polymorphisms (rs6277 and rs1800497) between subjects having familial (n=61) and clinical (n=45) risk for psychosis and a random sample of participating NFBC 1986 controls (n=74). Cognitive performance was evaluated using a comprehensive battery of tests at follow-up.
Principal components factor analysis supported a three-factor model for cognitive measures. The minor allele of rs6277 was associated with poorer performance on a verbal factor (p=0.003) but this did not significantly interact with familial or clinical risk for psychosis. The minor allele of rs1800497 was associated with poorer performance on a psychomotor factor (p=0.038), though only in those at familial risk for psychotic disorders (interaction p=0.049).
The effect of two DRD2 SNPs on cognitive performance may differ according to risk type for psychosis, suggesting that cognitive intermediate phenotypes differ according to the type (familial or clinical) risk for psychosis.
Notes
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 1989 Jun;154:797-8002597885
Cites: Nature. 2014 Jul 24;511(7510):421-725056061
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1991 Nov;148(11):1474-861681750
Cites: Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1993 Apr;100(4):310-58494831
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1996 Mar;153(3):321-308610818
Cites: Mol Psychiatry. 1998 May;3(3):256-609672901
Cites: Neuropsychology. 1998 Jul;12(3):426-459673998
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1999 Feb;156(2):286-939989565
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2004 Dec 15;72(1):1-315531401
Cites: Psychol Med. 2003 Oct;33(7):1239-4714580078
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2004 Apr 1;67(2-3):115-2214984870
Cites: Hum Mutat. 2004 Jun;23(6):540-515146457
Cites: Brain. 1988 Jun;111 ( Pt 3):695-7183382917
Cites: J Neurosci. 2005 Mar 9;25(10):2471-715758155
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;162(9):1749-5116135640
Cites: Neuron. 2006 Feb 16;49(4):603-1516476668
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 2006 May 1;59(9):863-7116325151
Cites: Genes Brain Behav. 2006 Jun;5(4):311-2816716201
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2007 Jan;33(1):49-6817101692
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2007 Feb;90(1-3):104-717113268
Cites: Neuropsychobiology. 2006;54(3):166-7017230034
Cites: Psychiatr Genet. 2007 Jun;17(3):159-6317417059
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2007 May;33(3):772-8117420177
Cites: Behav Res Methods. 2007 May;39(2):175-9117695343
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2008 Jan;65(1):28-3718180426
Cites: Nat Genet. 2008 Jul;40(7):827-3418583979
Cites: Brain Inj. 2008 Aug;22(9):705-1418698520
Cites: J Hum Genet. 2009 Feb;54(2):98-10719158809
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2009 Apr;109(1-3):24-3719223268
Cites: Behav Genet. 2009 May;39(3):285-9519148742
Cites: Synapse. 2009 Oct;63(10):907-1219582781
Cites: Behav Res Methods. 2009 Nov;41(4):1149-6019897823
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2010 Jun;67(6):578-8820530007
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2010 Jul;67(7):683-9120603449
Cites: Behav Genet. 2010 Sep;40(5):630-820567893
Cites: Neuropsychopharmacology. 2011 Jan;36(1):133-5220631684
Cites: J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2011 Apr;33(4):385-9421462045
Cites: J Neurosci. 2011 Apr 20;31(16):6188-9821508242
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2011 Aug;168(8):806-1321536691
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2013 Feb;143(2-3):239-4523245776
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e5586223383291
Cites: J Neurosci. 2000 Feb 1;20(3):1208-1510648725
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2000;26(1):119-3610755673
Cites: Neuroimage. 2000 Sep;12(3):268-7510944409
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2003 Apr;160(4):636-4512668349
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2013 May;39(3):564-7422290266
Cites: J Hum Genet. 2013 Apr;58(4):229-3223364393
Cites: Early Interv Psychiatry. 2013 May;7(2):146-5422672385
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2013 Sep;39(5):1018-2622927672
Cites: J Cogn Neurosci. 2014 Jan;26(1):54-6224001007
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2014 Jul;130(1):1-1524611632
Cites: Neuropsychologia. 1990;28(10):1021-342267054
PubMed ID
26114663 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of depressiveness with chronic facial pain: a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122444
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 May-Jul;71(3-4):644-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kirsi Sipilä
Pirjo Mäki
Anne Laajala
Anja Taanila
Matti Joukamaa
Juha Veijola
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland. kirsi.sipila@uef.fi
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 May-Jul;71(3-4):644-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Depression - complications
Facial Pain - complications
Female
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Abstract
Depression and pain are often co-morbid. Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) include facial pain as one main symptom. Reports are lacking on the association between chronic facial pain and earlier depressiveness. The aim of the study was to investigate whether depressiveness increases the risk for chronic facial pain in a longitudinal population-based study.
Subjects included in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (n = 5696) answered a questionnaire on facial pain and depressiveness using the Symptom Checklist-25 depression sub-scale at the age of 31 years. In addition, reported depression diagnosed by a doctor was enquired about. Three years later a sub-sample of the cohort, including 63 cases with chronic facial pain and 85 pain-free controls, was formed based on the question concerning facial pain.
Of the chronic facial pain cases 17.5% and of the pain-free controls 7.1% were depressive 3 years earlier at baseline (p = 0.050, ?(2) test, crude OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.0-8.0). Of the chronic facial pain cases 6.3% and of the pain-free controls 1.2% reported having had diagnosed depression (p = 0.085, crude OR = 5.7, 95% CI = 0.6-52.2). After adjusting the gender, the association between depressiveness reported at the baseline and chronic facial pain was significant (OR = 4.2, 95% CI = 1.1-16.2). When widespread pain was included in the analysis, the association was not significant.
Depressiveness increases the risk for chronic facial pain in a 3-year follow-up. This association seems to be mediated through widespread pain.
PubMed ID
22816436 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of stress and depression with chronic facial pain: A case-control study based on the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290457
Source
Cranio. 2017 May; 35(3):187-191
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Netta Nevalainen
Raija Lähdesmäki
Pirjo Mäki
Ellen Ek
Anja Taanila
Paula Pesonen
Kirsi Sipilä
Author Affiliation
a Institute of Dentistry , University of Oulu , Oulu , Finland.
Source
Cranio. 2017 May; 35(3):187-191
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Pain - etiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - complications - psychology
Facial Pain - etiology - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - complications - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim was to study the association between stress level and chronic facial pain, while controlling for the effect of depression on this association, during a three-year follow-up in a general population-based birth cohort.
In the general population-based Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort, information about stress level, depression and facial pain were collected using questionnaires at the age of 31 years. Stress level was measured using the Work Ability Index. Depression was assessed using the 13-item depression subscale in the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25. Three years later, a subsample of 52 subjects (42 women) with chronic facial pain and 52 pain-free controls (42 women) was formed.
Of the subjects having high stress level at baseline, 73.3% had chronic facial pain, and 26.7% were pain-free three years later. The univariate logistic regression analysis showed that high stress level at 31 years increased the risk for chronic facial pain (crude OR 6.1, 95%, CI 1.3-28.7) three years later. When including depression in a multivariate model, depression associated statistically significantly with chronic facial pain (adjusted OR 2.5, 95%, CI 1.0-5.8), whereas stress level did not (adjusted OR 2.3, 95%, CI 0.6-8.4).
High stress level is connected with increased risk for chronic facial pain. This association seems to mediate through depression.
PubMed ID
27324460 View in PubMed
Less detail

Body mass index and brain white matter structure in young adults at risk for psychosis - The Oulu Brain and Mind Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274906
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2016 Jul 6;254:169-176
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-6-2016
Author
Jenni Koivukangas
Lassi Björnholm
Osmo Tervonen
Jouko Miettunen
Tanja Nordström
Vesa Kiviniemi
Pirjo Mäki
Sari Mukkala
Irma Moilanen
Jennifer H Barnett
Peter B Jones
Juha Nikkinen
Juha Veijola
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2016 Jul 6;254:169-176
Date
Jul-6-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Antipsychotic medications and psychotic illness related factors may affect both weight and brain structure in people with psychosis. Genetically high-risk individuals offer an opportunity to study the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and brain structure free from these potential confounds. We examined the effect of BMI on white matter (WM) microstructure in subjects with familial risk for psychosis (FR). We used diffusion tensor imaging and tract-based spatial statistics to explore the effect of BMI on whole brain FA in 42 (13 males) participants with FR and 46 (16 males) control participants aged 20-25 years drawn from general population-based Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986. We also measured axial, radial and mean diffusivities. Most of the participants were normal weight rather than obese. In the FR group, decrease in fractional anisotropy and increase in radial diffusivity were associated with an increase in BMI in several brain areas. In controls the opposite pattern was seen in participants with higher BMI. There was a statistically significant interaction between group and BMI on FA and radial and mean diffusivities. Our results suggest that the effect of BMI on WM differs between individuals with FR for psychosis and controls.
PubMed ID
27474847 View in PubMed
Less detail

Brain structural deficits and working memory fMRI dysfunction in young adults who were diagnosed with ADHD in adolescence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279821
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2016 May;25(5):529-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Andres Roman-Urrestarazu
Päivi Lindholm
Irma Moilanen
Vesa Kiviniemi
Jouko Miettunen
Erika Jääskeläinen
Pirjo Mäki
Tuula Hurtig
Hanna Ebeling
Jennifer H Barnett
Juha Nikkinen
John Suckling
Peter B Jones
Juha Veijola
Graham K Murray
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2016 May;25(5):529-38
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - psychology
Brain - diagnostic imaging
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Male
Memory Disorders - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - psychology
Memory, Short-Term - physiology
Photic Stimulation - methods
Psychomotor Performance - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
When adolescents with ADHD enter adulthood, some no longer meet disorder diagnostic criteria but it is unknown if biological and cognitive abnorma lities persist. We tested the hypothesis that people diagnosed with ADHD during adolescence present residual brain abnormalities both in brain structure and in working memory brain function. 83 young adults (aged 20-24 years) from the Northern Finland 1986 Birth Cohort were classified as diagnosed with ADHD in adolescence (adolescence ADHD, n = 49) or a control group (n = 34). Only one patient had received medication for ADHD. T1-weighted brain scans were acquired and processed in a voxel-based analysis using permutation-based statistics. A sub-sample of both groups (ADHD, n = 21; controls n = 23) also performed a Sternberg working memory task whilst acquiring fMRI data. Areas of structural difference were used as a region of interest to evaluate the implications that structural abnormalities found in the ADHD group might have on working memory function. There was lower grey matter volume bilaterally in adolescence ADHD participants in the caudate (p 
Notes
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2000 May;157(5):816-810784477
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 2013 Oct 15;74(8):591-823566821
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 2000 Jul 1;48(1):9-2010913503
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2001 Feb;40(2):147-5811211363
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2001 Mar;58(3):289-9511231836
Cites: Med Image Anal. 2001 Jun;5(2):143-5611516708
Cites: Neuroimage. 2001 Jul;14(1 Pt 1):21-3611525331
Cites: Neuroimage. 2002 Oct;17(2):825-4112377157
Cites: Hum Brain Mapp. 2002 Nov;17(3):143-5512391568
Cites: Neuroimage. 2003 Oct;20(2):1052-6314568475
Cites: Eur J Neurosci. 2004 Feb;19(3):755-6014984425
Cites: Neuroimage. 2004 Apr;21(4):1732-4715050594
Cites: Neuroimage. 2004;23 Suppl 1:S208-1915501092
Cites: Science. 1966 Aug 5;153(3736):652-45939936
Cites: J Child Neurol. 1996 Mar;11(2):112-58881987
Cites: J Neurosci. 1997 May 15;17(10):3870-829133405
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1997 Jul;36(7):980-89204677
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 1997 Jul;11(3):298-3129246691
Cites: Arch Neurol. 1997 Aug;54(8):963-89267970
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 1998;59 Suppl 7:4-169680048
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2005 Jan;46(1):94-11115660647
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 2005 Jun 1;57(11):1263-7215949998
Cites: Psychol Med. 2006 Feb;36(2):159-6516420712
Cites: Trends Cogn Sci. 2006 Mar;10(3):117-2316460990
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2006 Aug;26(4):466-8516473440
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2006 Oct;47(10):1051-6217073984
Cites: Biol Psychiatry. 2007 Jun 15;61(12):1361-916950217
Cites: Brain. 2007 Sep;130(Pt 9):2375-8617698497
Cites: Mol Psychiatry. 2007 Sep;12(9):826-32, 79317471290
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2007 Dec;46(12):1575-8318030079
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2007 Dec;46(12):1584-9318030080
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2007 Dec;46(12):1594-60418030081
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2007 Dec;46(12):1605-1318030082
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2007 Dec;48(12):1251-818093031
Cites: BMC Psychiatry. 2008;8:5118590567
Cites: Neuroimage. 2009 Jan 1;44(1):83-9818501637
Cites: Neuroimage. 2009 Mar;45(1 Suppl):S173-8619059349
Cites: Hum Brain Mapp. 2009 Nov;30(11):3795-81119434601
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2010 Mar;196(3):235-4020194547
Cites: J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2010 Apr;38(3):315-2619960365
Cites: BMJ. 2010;340:c54920348184
Cites: Psychiatry Res. 2010 May 30;177(3):299-30420452063
Cites: J Atten Disord. 2011 Apr;15(3):204-1420562386
Cites: Psychiatry Res. 2011 Nov 30;194(2):119-2921937201
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2011 Nov;68(11):1122-3422065528
Cites: Trends Cogn Sci. 2012 Jan;16(1):17-2622169776
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2012 Feb;125(2):114-2622118249
Cites: Early Interv Psychiatry. 2013 May;7(2):146-5422672385
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 2013 May;122(2):532-4123421528
Cites: Neuroimage. 2000 Jun;11(6 Pt 1):805-2110860804
PubMed ID
26307356 View in PubMed
Less detail

Brain structure in different psychosis risk groups in the Northern Finland 1986 birth cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262202
Source
Schizophr Res. 2014 Mar;153(1-3):143-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Andres Roman-Urrestarazu
Graham K Murray
Anna Barnes
Jouko Miettunen
Erika Jääskeläinen
Pirjo Mäki
Juha Nikkinen
Jukka Remes
Sari Mukkala
Jenni Koivukangas
Markus Heinimaa
Irma Moilanen
John Suckling
Vesa Kiviniemi
Peter B Jones
Juha Veijola
Source
Schizophr Res. 2014 Mar;153(1-3):143-9
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brain - pathology
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Prodromal Symptoms
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychomotor Performance
Psychotic Disorders - classification - pathology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
We tested the hypothesis that family risk for psychosis (FR) and clinical risk for psychosis (CR) are associated with structural brain abnormalities, with increased deficits in those at both family risk and clinical risk for psychosis (FRCR). The study setting was the Oulu Brain and Mind Study, with subjects drawn from the Northern Finland 1986 Birth Cohort (n=9479) using register and questionnaire based screening, and interviews using the Structured Interview for Prodromal Symptoms. After this procedure, 172 subjects were included in the study, classified as controls (n=73) and three risk groups: FR excluding CR (FR, n=60), CR without FR (CR, n=26), and individuals at both FR and CR (FRCR, n=13). T1-weighted brain scans were acquired and processed in a voxel-based analysis using permutation-based statistics. In the comparison between FRCR versus controls, we found lower grey matter volume (GMV) in a cluster (1689 voxels at -4.00, -72.00, -18.00mm) covering both cerebellar hemispheres and the vermis. This cluster was subsequently used as a mask to extract mean GMV in all four groups: FR had a volume intermediate between controls and FRCR. Within FRCR there was an association between cerebellar cluster brain volume and motor function. These findings are consistent with an evolving pattern of cerebellar deficits in psychosis risk with the most pronounced deficits in those at highest risk of psychosis.
PubMed ID
24462264 View in PubMed
Less detail

Central executive network in young people with familial risk for psychosis - The Oulu Brain and Mind Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258430
Source
Schizophr Res. 2014 Nov 22;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-22-2014
Author
Tuomas Jukuri
Vesa Kiviniemi
Juha Nikkinen
Jouko Miettunen
Pirjo Mäki
Sari Mukkala
Jenni Koivukangas
Tanja Nordström
Juha Parkkisenniemi
Irma Moilanen
Jennifer H Barnett
Peter B Jones
Graham K Murray
Juha Veijola
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Oulu University Hospital, Finland; Thule Doctoral Programme, University of Oulu, Finland. Electronic address: tuomas.jukuri@oulu.fi.
Source
Schizophr Res. 2014 Nov 22;
Date
Nov-22-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The central executive network controls and manages high-level cognitive functions. Abnormal activation in the central executive network has been related to psychosis and schizophrenia but it is not established how this applies to people with familial risk for psychosis (FR).
We conducted a resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI) in 72 (29 males) young adults with a history of psychosis in one or both parents (FR) but without psychosis themselves, and 72 (29 males) similarly healthy control subjects without parental psychosis. Both groups in the Oulu Brain and Mind Study were drawn from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986. Participants were 20-25years old. Parental psychosis was established using the Care Register for Health Care. R-fMRI data pre-processing was conducted using independent component analysis with 30 and 70 components. A dual regression technique was used to detect between-group differences in the central executive network with p
PubMed ID
25468181 View in PubMed
Less detail

32 records – page 1 of 4.