Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

The community-acquired pneumonia symptom questionnaire: a new, patient-based outcome measure to evaluate symptoms in patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71570
Source
Chest. 2002 Sep;122(3):920-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Donna L Lamping
Sara Schroter
Patrick Marquis
Alexia Marrel
Isabelle Duprat-Lomon
Pierre-Philippe Sagnier
Author Affiliation
Health Services Research Unit, Department of Public Health and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK. donna.lamping@lshtm.ac.uk
Source
Chest. 2002 Sep;122(3):920-9
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Amoxicillin - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Anti-Infective Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Aza Compounds
Clarithromycin - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Community-Acquired Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy
Comparative Study
Double-Blind Method
Drug Therapy, Combination - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Fluoroquinolones
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pneumonia, Bacterial - diagnosis - drug therapy
Psychometrics
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Questionnaires
Quinolines
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE:s: To develop and validate a patient-based outcome measure to evaluate symptoms in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). DESIGN: A psychometric study within an international, prospective, randomized, double-blind study. The CAP-symptom questionnaire (CAP-Sym) is a new, 18-item, patient-reported outcome measure that evaluates the bothersomeness of CAP-related symptoms during the past 24 h using a 6-point Likert scale. We used "gold standard" psychometric methods to comprehensively evaluate the acceptability, reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the CAP-Sym. SETTING: Sixty-four centers in 13 countries (France, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Norway, Poland, Portugal, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom). PATIENTS: Five hundred fifty-six patients with CAP, recruited from outpatient clinics, general practice, and hospital centers. INTERVENTIONS: Randomization 1:1 to moxifloxacin (400 mg once daily), oral or standard oral treatment (amoxicillin, 1 g tid, or clarithromycin, 500 mg bid), alone or in combination, for up to 14 days. RESULTS: Standard psychometric tests confirmed the acceptability (item nonresponse, item-endorsement frequencies, item/scale floor and ceiling effects), reliability (internal consistency, item-total and inter-item correlations, test-retest reliability), validity (content, construct, convergent, discriminant, known groups), and responsiveness of the CAP-Sym. CONCLUSIONS: The CAP-Sym is a practical and scientifically sound patient-based outcome measure of CAP-related symptoms that has been developed using "gold standard" methods. As the only fully validated measure of symptoms in patients with CAP, which is quick and easy to administer and is more responsive than the generic Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, the CAP-Sym provides a practical and rigorous method for improving the evaluation of outcomes in clinical trials and audit.
PubMed ID
12226033 View in PubMed
Less detail

Scaling properties of childhood infectious diseases epidemics before and after mass vaccination in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174882
Source
J Theor Biol. 2005 Aug 7;235(3):326-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-7-2005
Author
Helen Trottier
Pierre Philippe
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Montreal, Pavillon 1420 boul. Mont-Royal, Montréal, Canada H2V 4P3. htrottier@sympatico.ca
Source
J Theor Biol. 2005 Aug 7;235(3):326-37
Date
Aug-7-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology - immunology
Disease Outbreaks
Humans
Immunization Programs
Infection Control
Measles - epidemiology - immunology
Models, Biological
Models, Statistical
Mumps - epidemiology - immunology
Rubella - epidemiology - immunology
Vaccination
Whooping Cough - epidemiology - immunology
Abstract
The goal of this paper is to analyse the scaling properties of childhood infectious disease time-series data. We present a scaling analysis of the distribution of epidemic sizes of measles, rubella, pertussis, and mumps outbreaks in Canada. This application provides a new approach in assessing infectious disease dynamics in a large vaccinated population. An inverse power-law (IPL) distribution function has been fit to the time series of epidemic sizes, and the results assessed against an exponential benchmark model. We have found that the rubella epidemic size distribution and that of measles in highly vaccinated periods follow an IPL. The IPL suggests the presence of a scale-invariant network for these diseases as a result of the heterogeneity of the individual contact rates. By contrast, it was found that pertussis and mumps were characterized by a uniform network of transmission of the exponential type, which suggests homogeneity in the contact rate or, more likely, boiled down heterogeneity by large intermixing in the population. We conclude that the topology of the network of infectious contacts depends on the disease type and its infection rate. It also appears that the socio-demographic structure of the population may play a part (e.g. pattern of contacts according to age) in the structuring of the topology of the network. The findings suggest that there is relevant information hidden in the variation of the common contagious disease time-series data, and that this information can have a bearing on the strategy of vaccination programs.
PubMed ID
15882695 View in PubMed
Less detail