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Estimating survival of dental fillings on the basis of interval-censored data and multi-state models.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126757
Source
Stat Med. 2012 May 20;31(11-12):1139-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-2012
Author
Pierre Joly
Thomas A Gerds
Vibeke Qvist
Daniel Commenges
Niels Keiding
Author Affiliation
INSERM, U-897, Bordeaux, F33076, France. Pierre.Joly@isped.u-bordeaux2.fr
Source
Stat Med. 2012 May 20;31(11-12):1139-49
Date
May-20-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Dental Caries - therapy
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Statistical
Tooth Eruption
Abstract
We aim to compare the life expectancy of a filling in a primary tooth between two types of treatments. We define the probabilities that a dental filling survives without complication until the permanent tooth erupts from beneath (exfoliation). We relate the time to exfoliation of the tooth to the age of the child and the time to failure of the filling to the duration since the treatment. We followed up fillings at repeated examinations where information is collected regarding the filling and the tooth. Several fillings can be placed in the same mouth, possibly by the same dentist. To deal with all these particularities, we propose to use a parametric four-state model with three random effects to take into account the hierarchical cluster structure. For inference, right and interval censoring as well as left truncation have to be dealt with. With the proposed approach, we can conclude that the estimated probability that a filling survives without complication until exfoliation is larger for one treatment than for the other, for all ages of the child at the time of treatment.
PubMed ID
22359322 View in PubMed
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Executive functions in the evaluation of accident risk of older drivers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190342
Source
J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2002 Apr;24(2):221-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Geneviève Daigneault
Pierre Joly
Jean-Yves Frigon
Author Affiliation
Réseau de Santé Richelieu-Yamaska de St-Hyacinthe, Quebec, Canada. gedaigneault@hotmail.com
Source
J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2002 Apr;24(2):221-38
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Automobile Driver Examination
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Psychomotor Performance
Quebec
Reference Values
Risk-Taking
Abstract
The main objective of these studies was to analyse the difference in driving attitude and aptitude, between two groups of elderly male drivers (65 years or more), one being accident-free and the second having three accidents or more in the last 5 years. The first study compared the driving habits of 90 older accident-free drivers with 90 drivers having a history of accidents. The second study, on a subgroup of 60 of the original 180 subjects (30 accident-free and 30 having accidents), compared cognitive function, with particular emphasis on executive functions as measured by neuropsychological tests, and attitude and self-reported driving behaviour. The results show that elderly drivers having a history of accidents, compared to the control group: (1) have poorer performance on the four cognitive measurements of executive functions; (2) report to have more prudent behaviour on the road (e.g., reducing their speed); and (3) have the intention to adopt less risky driving behaviour. This study suggests that a subgroup of the older driver population has cognitive problems and driving disabilities that cannot be compensated by apparently more careful behaviour on the road. The results confirm the importance of proper assessment of cognitive processes and underscore the potential of measuring executive functions for the evaluation of driving competence of elderly persons.
PubMed ID
11992205 View in PubMed
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