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Infant, mother, and contextual predictors of mother-very low birth weight infant interaction at 9 months of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176112
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2005 Feb;26(1):24-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Nancy Feeley
Laurie Gottlieb
Phyllis Zelkowitz
Author Affiliation
Centre for Nursing Research, S.M.B.D. Jewish General Hospital, 3755 Côte St. Catherine Road, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3T 1E2. nancy.feeley@mcgill.ca
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2005 Feb;26(1):24-33
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Anxiety - psychology
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Education
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - psychology
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Middle Aged
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Social Support
Abstract
This prospective study examined how characteristics of infants (i.e., birth weight and perinatal illness severity), mothers (i.e., anxiety and level of education), and the social context (i.e., maternal received and perceived helpfulness of support) related to mother-very low birth weight (VLBW) infant interaction in 72 dyads. Infant, mother, and contextual factors were assessed at 3 and 9 months of age, and mothers and infants were observed in teaching interactions at 9 months. Dyads whose interaction was more sensitive and responsive included mothers who were better educated and less anxious at 3 months and reported higher perceived support at 3 months. The findings highlight the importance of maternal education and well-being in the parenting of VLBW infants.
PubMed ID
15718880 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mothers and fathers of very low-birthweight infants: similarities and differences in the first year after birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160524
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2007 Nov-Dec;36(6):558-67
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nancy Feeley
Laurie Gottlieb
Phyllis Zelkowitz
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Centre for Nursing Research, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. nancy.feeley@mcgill.ca
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2007 Nov-Dec;36(6):558-67
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Age Factors
Anxiety - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Canada
Fathers - education - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Maternal Behavior
Middle Aged
Mothers - education - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Paternal Behavior
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Abstract
To compare the psychosocial adjustment and the quality of interaction with their infant of mothers and fathers of very low-birthweight infants at two time points in the first year of the infant's life.
Quantitative, longitudinal design.
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of two Canadian urban hospitals.
Sixty-one couples who had an infant born weighing less than 1,500 g.
State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Parenting Sense of Competence questionnaire, and the Support in Parenting Questionnaire were completed at 3 and 9 months of age. Parent-infant interaction was observed at 9 months and scored with the Nursing Child Assessment Teaching Scale.
Fathers' reported parenting self-efficacy was significantly lower than mothers' at both 3 and 9 months of age. Fathers reported more received support than mothers, and the amount of support that both mothers and fathers reported increased significantly from the 3-month to the 9-month assessment. Mothers and fathers reported similar levels of anxiety and perceived helpfulness of the support they received and were equally sensitive and responsive in interactions with their infants at 9 months of age.
Similarities and differences between mothers and fathers were observed. It is important for nurses to assess mothers and fathers, how any differences are perceived by the couple, and how any differences might be affecting them during the neonatal intensive care unit hospitalization and in early months after discharge.
PubMed ID
17973699 View in PubMed
Less detail