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Antibody kinetics among 8-10 years old respondents to hepatitis B vaccination in a low endemic country and the effect of a booster dose given 5 or 10 years later.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149103
Source
Vaccine. 2009 Oct 9;27(43):6048-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-9-2009
Author
Vladimir Gilca
Gaston De Serres
Nicole Boulianne
Philippe De Wals
Donald Murphy
Gisele Trudeau
Richard Massé
Bernard Duval
Author Affiliation
Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Laval University, Quebec, Canada. vladimir.gilca@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Vaccine. 2009 Oct 9;27(43):6048-53
Date
Oct-9-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis B - immunology - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Antibodies - blood - immunology
Hepatitis B Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Humans
Immunization, Secondary
Kinetics
Male
Quebec
Young Adult
Abstract
Few data are available concerning the persistence of anti-HBs and the effect of booster doses given several years post-vaccination against hepatitis B during preadolescence. The objective of this open-labelled clinical trial was to evaluate the persistence of antibodies after vaccination with three paediatric doses of Engerix-B at the age of 8-10 years and the effect of a booster dose given 5 (Group Y5) or 10 (Group Y10) years later. Anti-HBs were measured before and one month post-primary vaccination, then 5 and 10 years later, before the booster dose, as well as one month and 1 year post-booster. The anamnestic response was defined as a >or=fourfold increase of anti-HBs post-booster (>or=10 IU/L) when compared to pre-booster. Ten years post-primary vaccination, 559 of the 652 initially randomized subjects (86%) were eligible for analysis. Group Y5, 5 years post-booster results: 99% of subjects had detectable levels of antibodies and 96% a titer >or=10 IU/L. The anti-HBs GMTs decreased from 114,489 IU/L one month post-booster to 3354 IU/L 5 years later. Group Y10 results: 10 years post-primary vaccination 96% of subjects had a detectable level of anti-HBs and 85% were above the threshold of 10 IU/L. The GMTs one month post-booster were 31,030 IU/L. The challenge with a booster demonstrated an anamnestic response in 99% of subjects in group Y5 and 100% of subjects in group Y10. All subjects were anti-HBc negative. The booster doses were well tolerated. The excellent anamnestic response observed after the booster dose demonstrates the persistence of immunity in virtually all young adults vaccinated at the age of 8-10 with three paediatric doses of Engerix-B.
PubMed ID
19683086 View in PubMed
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Benefits and costs of immunization of children with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184064
Source
Vaccine. 2003 Sep 8;21(25-26):3757-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-8-2003
Author
Philippe De Wals
Geneviève Petit
Lonny James Erickson
Maryse Guay
Theresa Tam
Barbara Law
Alicia Framarin
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, Quebec City, Que., Canada G1K 7P4. philippe.dewals@msp.ulaval.ca
Source
Vaccine. 2003 Sep 8;21(25-26):3757-64
Date
Sep-8-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Computer simulation
Cost of Illness
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Databases, Factual
Drug Costs
Female
Humans
Immunization Programs - economics
Immunization, Secondary - economics
Infant
Male
Models, Economic
Pneumococcal Infections - economics - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines - economics - immunology
Vaccines, Conjugate - economics - immunology
Abstract
To estimate cost-effectiveness of routine and catch-up vaccination of Canadian children with seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, a simulation model was constructed. In base scenario (vaccination coverage: 80%, and vaccine price: 58 dollars per dose), pneumococcal disease incidence reduction would be superior to 60% for invasive infections, and to 30% for non-invasive infections, but the number of deaths prevented would be small. Annual costs of routine immunization would be 71 million dollars (98% borne by the health system). Societal benefit to cost ratio would be 0.57. Net societal costs per averted pneumococcal disease would be 389 dollars and 125,000 per life-year gained (LYG). Vaccine purchase cost is the most important variable in sensitivity analyses, and program costs would be superior to societal benefits in all likely scenarios. Vaccination would result in net savings for society, if vaccine cost is less than 30 dollars per dose. Economic indicators of catch-up programs are less favorable than for routine infant immunization.
PubMed ID
12922109 View in PubMed
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Biopsychosocial determinants of pregnancy length and fetal growth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157626
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2008 May;22(3):240-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Jennifer St-Laurent
Philippe De Wals
Jean-Marie Moutquin
Theophile Niyonsenga
Manon Noiseux
Loretta Czernis
Author Affiliation
Clinical Research Centre, Sherbrooke University Hospital Centre, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2008 May;22(3):240-8
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth weight
Body mass index
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Fetal Development - physiology
Gestational Age
Health status
Humans
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Self Concept
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
The causes and mechanisms related to preterm delivery and intrauterine growth restriction are poorly understood. Our objective was to assess the direct and indirect effects of psychosocial and biomedical factors on the duration of pregnancy and fetal growth. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to pregnant women attending prenatal ultrasound clinics in nine hospitals in the Montérégie region in the province of Quebec, Canada, from November 1997 to May 1998. Prenatal questionnaires were linked with birth certificates. Theoretical models explaining pregnancy length and fetal growth were developed and tested, using path analysis. In order to reduce the number of variables from the questionnaire, a principal component analysis was performed, and the three most important new dimensions were retained as explanatory variables in the final models. Data were available for 1602 singleton pregnancies. The biophysical score, covering both maternal age and the pre-pregnancy body mass index, was the only variable statistically associated with pregnancy length. Smoking, obstetric history, maternal health and biophysical indices were direct predictors of fetal growth. Perceived stress, social support and self-esteem were not directly related to pregnancy outcomes, but were determinants of smoking and the above-mentioned biomedical variables. More studies are needed to identify the mechanisms by which adverse psychosocial factors are translated into adverse biological effects.
PubMed ID
18426519 View in PubMed
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Burden of acute otitis media on Canadian families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137743
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2011 Jan;57(1):60-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Eve Dubé
Philippe De Wals
Vladimir Gilca
Nicole Boulianne
Manale Ouakki
France Lavoie
Richard Bradet
Author Affiliation
Quebec National Institute of Public Health, Quebec, QC. eve.dube@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2011 Jan;57(1):60-5
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Acute Disease
Adult
Age Distribution
Canada - epidemiology
Caregivers - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Cost of Illness
Episode of Care
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Infant
Nonprescription Drugs - therapeutic use
Otitis Media - complications - drug therapy - economics - epidemiology
Physicians, Family - utilization
Prescription Drugs - therapeutic use
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To estimate the burden of acute otitis media (AOM) on Canadian families.
Telephone survey using random-digit dialing.
All Canadian provinces between May and June 2008.
Caregivers of 1 or more children aged 6 months to 5 years.
Caregivers' reports on the number of AOM episodes experienced by the child in the past 12 months, as well as disease characteristics, health services and medication use, time spent on medical consultations (including travel), and time taken off from work to care for the sick children.
A total of 502 eligible caregivers were recruited, 161 (32%) of whom reported at least 1 AOM episode for their children and 42 (8%) of whom reported 3 or more episodes during the past 12 months. Most children (94%, 151 of 161) visited with health professionals during their most recent AOM episodes. The average time required for medical examination was 3.1 hours in an emergency department and 1.8 hours in an outpatient clinic. Overall, 93% of episodes resulted in antibiotics use. A substantial proportion of caregivers (38%) missed work during this time; the average time taken off work was 15.9 hours.
In Canada, episodes of AOM are still associated with substantial use of health services and indirect costs to the caregivers.
Notes
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Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 2011 Apr;57(4):41221490351
PubMed ID
21252135 View in PubMed
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Burden of respiratory infections and otitis media in the Inuit population of Nunavik, Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305153
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2020 12; 79(1):1799688
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2020
Author
Philippe De Wals
Z Zhou
J B LeMeur
J F Proulx
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University , Quebec City, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2020 12; 79(1):1799688
Date
12-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Respiratory infections are a major health problem in the Inuit population of Nunavik, province of Quebec, Canada.
A study was undertaken to assess the burden of lower (LRTI) and upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) and otitis media (OM) and to explore some of their determinants including the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) status.
The reference population includes children less than 5 years of age born in 1994-2010 and a sample of 825 children was selected for this study. Outpatient medical records were reviewed. Visits with a diagnosis of LRTI, URTI and OM were extracted. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were performed to identify predictors of disease risk.
The average number of LRTI, URTI and OM episodes were, respectively, 2.6, 6.2 and 5.9 from birth up to the 5th birthday. Seasonal patterns were similar for URTI and OM, but was different for LRTI. Children who received the recommended 4 PCV doses had a lower LRTI and OM risk than unvaccinated children. There was a trend towards a lower OM risk associated with a mixed PCV10+ PCV13 schedule compared with PCV7.
Results suggest a lower LRTI and OM risk associated with PCV use in this high-risk population but respiratory disease risk remains high compared with the general population in Quebec.
PubMed ID
32730119 View in PubMed
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The changing epidemiology of meningococcal disease in Quebec, Canada, 1991-2011: potential implications of emergence of new strains.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118443
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(11):e50659
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Rodica Gilca
Geneviève Deceuninck
Brigitte Lefebvre
Raymond Tsang
Rachid Amini
Vladimir Gilca
Monique Douville-Fradet
France Markowski
Philippe De Wals
Author Affiliation
Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. rodica.gilca@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(11):e50659
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - mortality
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
In order to inform meningococcal disease prevention strategies, we analysed the epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in the province of Quebec, Canada, 10 years before and 10 years after the introduction of serogroup C conjugate vaccination.
IMD cases reported to the provincial notifiable disease registry in 1991-2011 and isolates submitted for laboratory surveillance in 1997-2011 were analysed. Serogrouping, PCR testing and assignment of isolates to sequence types (ST) by using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were performed.
Yearly overall IMD incidence rates ranged from 2.2-2.3/100,000 in 1991-1992 to 0.49/100,000 in 1999-2000, increasing to 1.04/100,000 in 2011. Among the 945 IMD cases identified by laboratory surveillance in 1997-2011, 68%, 20%, 8%, and 3% were due to serogroups B, C, Y, and W135, respectively. Serogroup C IMD almost disappeared following the implementation of universal childhood immunization with monovalent C conjugate vaccines in 2002. Serogroup B has been responsible for 88% of all IMD cases and 61% of all IMD deaths over the last 3 years. The number and proportion of ST-269 clonal complex has been steadily increasing among the identified clonal complexes of serogroup B IMD since its first identification in 2003, representing 65% of serogroup B IMD in 2011. This clonal complex was first introduced in adolescent and young adults, then spread to other age groups.
Important changes in the epidemiology of IMD have been observed in Quebec during the last two decades. Serogroup C has been virtually eliminated. In recent years, most cases have been caused by the serogroup B ST-269 clonal complex. Although overall burden of IMD is low, the use of a vaccine with potential broad-spectrum coverage could further reduce the burden of disease. Acceptability, feasibility and cost-effectiveness studies coupled with ongoing clinical and molecular surveillance are necessary in guiding public policy decisions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23209803 View in PubMed
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Comparative long term immunogenicity of two recombinant hepatitis B vaccines and the effect of a booster dose given after five years in a low endemicity country.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175878
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2005 Mar;24(3):213-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Bernard Duval
Vladimir Gîlca
Nicole Boulianne
Philippe De Wals
Richard Massé
Gisele Trudeau
Gaston De Serres
Author Affiliation
Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, Québec, Canada. bernard.duval@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2005 Mar;24(3):213-8
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Child
Cohort Studies
Endemic Diseases
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Antibodies - analysis - immunology
Hepatitis B vaccines - administration & dosage
Humans
Immunity - physiology
Immunization Schedule
Immunization, Secondary
Immunologic Memory
Incidence
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Time Factors
Vaccination - standards - trends
Vaccines, Synthetic - administration & dosage
Abstract
Few data are available concerning the long term immunogenicity of the pediatric doses of hepatitis B vaccines given to preteenagers. The long term effect of the booster dose in teenagers is unknown. We evaluated the immunogenicity of 2 pediatric hepatitis vaccines after primary vaccination and after a booster dose.
A prospective 15-year follow-up study of the immunogenicity of 2 hepatitis B vaccines was initiated in 1995 in Quebec City, Canada. One year apart, 1129 children 8-10 years old received Engerix-B 10 microg (EB), and 1126 received Recombivax-HB 2.5 microg (RB) vaccine after a 0-, 1-, 6-month schedule. After 5 years, one-third of the 2 cohorts were randomly selected. A booster dose of EB 10 microg or RB 5 microg was administered according to the vaccine used in the primary immunization. Antibodies were measured before, 1 month after and 1 year after the booster injection.
Before the booster dose, anti-HB surface antibody (HBs) was detected in 94.7% of the EB subjects and in 95.2% of the RB subjects (P = 0.85). The geometric mean titer (GMT) was higher in the EB than in the RB group (252 mIU/mL versus 66 mIU/mL, P or =10 mIU/mL. The anti-HBs GMT was 113,201 mIU/mL in the EB and 16,623 mIU/mL in the RB groups (P or =10 mIU/mL. The anti-HBs GMT was 14,028 mIU/mL in the EB and 3437 mIU/mL in the RB group (P
PubMed ID
15750456 View in PubMed
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Cost-effectiveness of a 3-dose pneumococcal conjugate vaccine program in the province of Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148331
Source
Vaccine. 2009 Nov 23;27(50):7105-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-23-2009
Author
Béatrice Poirier
Philippe De Wals
Geneviève Petit
Lonny J Erickson
Jacques Pépin
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Canada.
Source
Vaccine. 2009 Nov 23;27(50):7105-9
Date
Nov-23-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Care Costs
Humans
Immunization Programs - economics
Models, Economic
Pneumococcal Infections - economics - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines - economics
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Quebec
Vaccines, Conjugate - economics
Abstract
In the province of Quebec, Canada, the pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) was licensed in 2001 and a publicly funded program was implemented in 2004, recommending 3 doses for healthy children. An economic analysis was performed both from a health care and societal perspective. Outcomes possibly prevented by PCV-7 and observed in 2006-2007 were compared to expected frequencies based on rates measured before PCV-7 use. Annual program costs were close to $21M for the health system and $23M for society. Approximately 20,000 infections were prevented annually and estimated economic benefits were $5M for the health system and $23M for society, using a 3% per annum discounting rate. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $18,000 per QALY gained for the health system and the program was close to the break-even threshold in a societal perspective.
PubMed ID
19786137 View in PubMed
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Cost-effectiveness of immunization strategies for the control of serogroup C meningococcal disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181254
Source
Vaccine. 2004 Mar 12;22(9-10):1233-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-12-2004
Author
Philippe De Wals
Van Hung Nguyen
Lonny J Erickson
Maryse Guay
Jean Drapeau
Jennifer St-Laurent
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, Pavillon de l'Est, 2180 chemin Sainte-Foy, Quebec, Que., Canada G1K 7P4. philippe.dewals@msp.ulaval.ca
Source
Vaccine. 2004 Mar 12;22(9-10):1233-40
Date
Mar-12-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Humans
Mass Vaccination - economics
Meningitis, Meningococcal - economics - epidemiology - immunology
Meningococcal Vaccines - economics - immunology
Neisseria meningitidis, Serogroup C - immunology
Quebec - epidemiology
Vaccines, Conjugate - immunology
Abstract
This study compares the cost-effectiveness of a control strategy for serogroup C meningococcal disease (CMD) relying on surveillance and implementation of a mass immunization campaign effective 1 year after the beginning of an epidemic with strategies based on routine immunization, using either three doses of serogroup C conjugate vaccine given in early infancy or one dose at 1 year of age. The simulation model is based on 25 birth cohorts followed up to age 24 years, and seven epidemiological scenarios including low and high level endemicity, and one to five epidemics over a 49-year period. Epidemiological and cost data were mainly collected in the province of Quebec, Canada. Results indicate that the most effective strategy is a three-dose routine program, with the least effective strategy being mass immunization. A one-dose routine program is the most cost-effective strategy in most likely scenarios. In a societal perspective with a vaccine purchase price of CDN$ 50 per dose, the average incremental cost of the one-dose strategy would be $ 190,000 per case averted, US$ 23,000 per life-year gained, and US$ 42,000 per QALY gained. If vaccine-induced immunity is waning rapidly, mass immunization or routine vaccination with booster dose(s) would be the best control options.
PubMed ID
15003652 View in PubMed
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Economic analysis of the 1992-1993 mass immunization campaign against serogroup C meningococcal disease in Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189452
Source
Vaccine. 2002 Jun 21;20(21-22):2840-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-21-2002
Author
Philippe De Wals
Lonny Erickson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Sherbrooke, 3001 12th Avenue North, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada J1H 5N4. Philippe.Dewals@msp.ulaval.ca
Source
Vaccine. 2002 Jun 21;20(21-22):2840-4
Date
Jun-21-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Community Health Services - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Care Costs
Humans
Immunization
Mass Vaccination - economics - methods
Meningococcal Infections - economics - epidemiology - prevention & control
Meningococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage - economics
Polysaccharides, Bacterial - immunology
Quebec - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The objective of the study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and utility of the mass immunization campaign performed in the province of Quebec in 1992-1993, following an outbreak of serogroup C meningococcal disease (CMD). Effectiveness data were extracted from a population-based cohort study, and cost estimates were obtained from surveys. Costs of the campaign to the health system were $ 26 million (1993 Canadian dollars). Between 48 and 74 CMD cases, and between 7 and 11 deaths were prevented in the following 5 years. Net societal costs were between $ 18 and 21 million (using a 3% discount rate), net costs per death averted were between $ 1.7 and 3.0 million, between $ 58,000 and 105,000 per life-year gained, and between $ 49,000 and 87,000 per quality-adjusted life-year gained. These economic indices are less favorable than those for current routine immunization programs in Canada, but within the range of those for other common health interventions.
PubMed ID
12102036 View in PubMed
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52 records – page 1 of 6.