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A scoping review of traditional food security in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288013
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec;77(1):1419678
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Amanda Walch
Andrea Bersamin
Philip Loring
Rhonda Johnson
Melissa Tholl
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec;77(1):1419678
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Food insecurity is a public health concern. Food security includes the pillars of food access, availability and utilisation. For some indigenous peoples, this may also include traditional foods. To conduct a scoping review on traditional foods and food security in Alaska. Google Scholar and the High North Research Documents were used to search for relevant primary research using the following terms: "traditional foods", "food security", "access", "availability", "utilisation", "Alaska", "Alaska Native" and "indigenous". Twenty four articles from Google Scholar and four articles from the High North Research Documents were selected. The articles revealed three types of research approaches, those that quantified traditional food intake (n=18), those that quantified food security (n=2), and qualitative articles that addressed at least one pillar of food security (n=8). Limited primary research is available on food security in Alaskan. Few studies directly measure food security while most provide a review of food security factors. Research investigating dietary intake of traditional foods is more prevalent, though many differences exist among participant age groups and geographical areas. Future research should include direct measurements of traditional food intake and food security to provide a more complete picture of traditional food security in Alaska.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29292675 View in PubMed
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Traditional Food Practices, Attitudes, and Beliefs in Urban Alaska Native Women Receiving WIC Assistance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295785
Source
J Nutr Educ Behav. 2018 Nov 05; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-05-2018
Author
Amanda Walch
Philip Loring
Rhonda Johnson
Melissa Tholl
Andrea Bersamin
Author Affiliation
Dietetics and Nutrition Department, University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK.
Source
J Nutr Educ Behav. 2018 Nov 05; :
Date
Nov-05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
To identify practices, attitudes, and beliefs associated with intake of traditional foods among Alaska Native women.
Cross-sectional study that measured traditional food intake; participation in food-sharing networks; presence of a hunter or fisherman in the home; the preference, healthfulness, and economic value of traditional foods; and financial barriers to obtaining these foods.
Purposive sample of 71 low-income Alaska Native women receiving Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) assistance in Anchorage, AK.
Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses.
Traditional foods contributed 4% of total daily calories. Given a choice, 63% of participants indicated that they would prefer half or more of the foods they ate to be traditional (ie, not store-bought). The majority of participants (64%) believed that traditional foods were healthier than store-bought foods. Of all participants, 72% relied on food-sharing networks for traditional foods; only 21% acquired traditional foods themselves. Participants who ate more traditional foods preferred traditional foods (B?=?.011 P?=?.02).
Traditional food intake was low and findings suggested that Alaska Native women living in an urban setting prefer to consume more but are unable to do so. Future research might examine the effect of enhancing social networks and implementing policies that support traditional food intake.
PubMed ID
30409694 View in PubMed
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