Skip header and navigation

Refine By

28 records – page 1 of 3.

Adaptation to the birth of a child with a congenital anomaly: a prospective longitudinal study of maternal well-being and psychological distress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259696
Source
Dev Psychol. 2014 Jun;50(6):1827-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Ragnhild B Nes
Espen Røysamb
Lars J Hauge
Tom Kornstad
Markus A Landolt
Lorentz M Irgens
Leif Eskedal
Petter Kristensen
Margarete E Vollrath
Source
Dev Psychol. 2014 Jun;50(6):1827-39
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Checklist
Child, Preschool
Cleft Lip - psychology
Cohort Studies
Down Syndrome - psychology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Models, Statistical
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy
Stress, Psychological - physiopathology
Abstract
This study explores the stability and change in maternal life satisfaction and psychological distress following the birth of a child with a congenital anomaly using 5 assessments from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study collected from Pregnancy Week 17 to 36 months postpartum. Participating mothers were divided into those having infants with (a) Down syndrome (DS; n = 114), (b) cleft lip/palate (CLP; n = 179), and (c) no disability (ND; n = 99,122). Responses on the Satisfaction With Life Scale and a short version of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist were analyzed using structural equation modeling, including latent growth curves. Satisfaction and distress levels were highly diverse in the sample, but fairly stable over time (retest correlations: .47-.68). However, the birth of a child with DS was associated with a rapid decrease in maternal life satisfaction and a corresponding increase in psychological distress observed between pregnancy and 6 months postpartum. The unique effects from DS on changes in satisfaction (Cohen's d = -.66) and distress (Cohen's d = .60) remained stable. Higher distress and lower life satisfaction at later assessments appeared to reflect a persistent burden that was already experienced 6 months after birth. CLP had a temporary impact (Cohen's d = .29) on maternal distress at 6 months. However, the overall trajectories did not differ between CLP and ND mothers. In sum, the birth of a child with DS influences maternal psychological distress and life satisfaction throughout the toddler period, whereas a curable condition like CLP has only a minor temporary effect on maternal psychological distress.
PubMed ID
24588521 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adult social position and sick leave: the mediating effect of physical workload.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275793
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2015 Nov;41(6):542-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Karina Corbett
Jon Michaeal Gran
Petter Kristensen
Ingrid Sivesind Mehlum
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2015 Nov;41(6):542-53
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study aimed to quantify how much of the adult social gradient in sick leave can be attributed to the mediating role of physical workload while accounting for the role of childhood and adolescent social position and neuroticism.
Our sample consisted of 2099 women and 1229 men from a Norwegian birth cohort study (born 1967-1976) who participated in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (2006-2008) (HUNT3). Data on sick leave (defined as >16 calendar days; 2006-2009) and social position during childhood, adolescence, and adulthood were obtained from national registers. Study outcome was time-to-first sick leave spell. Physical workload and neuroticism were self-reported in HUNT3. Mediating effects through physical workload were estimated using a method based on the additive hazards survival model.
A hypothetical change from highest to lowest group in adult social position was, for women, associated with 51.6 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 24.7-78.5] additional spells per 100,000 person-days at risk, in a model adjusted for childhood and adolescent social position and neuroticism. The corresponding rate increase for men was 41.1 (95% CI 21.4-60.8). Of these additional spells, the proportion mediated through physical workload was 24% (95% CI 10-49) and 30% (95% CI 10-63) for women and men, respectively.
The effect of adult social position on sick leave was partly mediated through physical workload, even while accounting for earlier life course factors. Our findings provide support that interventions aimed at reducing physical workload among those with lower adult social position could reduce sick leave risk.
PubMed ID
26416156 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A follow up of persons who received basic and/or supplemental benefits in childhood]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29203
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Feb 9;126(4):436-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-9-2006
Author
Tor Bjerkedal
Petter Kristensen
Geir A Skjeret
John Ivar Brevik
Author Affiliation
Forsvarets sanitet, Militaermedisinsk epidemiologi, Ullevål universitetssykehus, Oslo mil/Akershus, 0015 Oslo. tor.bjerkedal@chello.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Feb 9;126(4):436-9
Date
Feb-9-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease - economics - mortality - psychology
Comparative Study
Disabled Children - psychology
Educational Status
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income
Infant
Male
Norway
Pensions
Registries
Social Security
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Consequences of chronic diseases in childhood with respect to health, educational achievement and participation in the labour force in young adult age are evaluated. MATERIAL AND METHODS :A total of 14,364 children (2.3%) of the 626,928 born in Norway 1967-76 received basic and /or supplemental benefits for at least one year of the age span 0-16 years. The more common diagnoses included Endocrine diseases (diabetes), disease classified under Mental diagnoses, Neurological diseases and Congenital malformations. All the children were followed up to the age of 27 with respect to mortality and disability pensioning and to the age of 25 with regard to education, participation in the labour force and income, and in addition national service for the men. The study was made possible through the linking of data from several national registers, performed by Statistics Norway. Before the file was released for analyses, all personal identification was removed. RESULTS: Basic and supplementary benefits in childhood predict adverse outcomes in young adult age: mortality, disability, low education, lack of gainful employment and low pensionable income. The diagnosis registered with the benefit strongly influenced the outcomes. Conscripts who had received benefits were judged to have a mean score for general ability of 4.5 compared to 5.2. Adjusted for score for general ability the proportion of those having received benefits achieving higher education was 84% of that of those that had not received benefits. After adjustment for educational attainment, the percentage gainfully employed was 11-12% less among subjects having received benefits in childhood. This negative association between having received a benefit in childhood and gainful employment in adulthood was restricted to the low educational group. INTERPRETATION: Persons with health problems in childhood did not achieve the education, employment and income they should have been capable of judged by their general ability and the education they had actually achieved.
PubMed ID
16477279 View in PubMed
Less detail

Birthweight and work participation in adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58269
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2004 Aug;33(4):849-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Petter Kristensen
Tor Bjerkedal
Lorentz M Irgens
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, PO Box 8149, 0033 Oslo, Norway. petter.kristensen@stami.no
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2004 Aug;33(4):849-56
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Socioeconomic Factors
Unemployment
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In a number of studies, birthweight has been associated with cognition and educational attainment into adult age. However, the association is not clear between birthweight and work participation in adulthood. We investigated this association assessing to which extent it was influenced by circumstances concerning family background or disease in early life. METHODS: Through linkage between several national registers containing personal information from birth into adult age we established a longitudinal, population-based cohort study. Study participants were all 308 829 singletons born in Norway in 1967-1971 as registered by the Medical Birth Registry of Norway who were national residents at age 29. The study outcome was unemployment defined as a lack of personal income among people who were not under education in the calendar year of their 29th birthday as registered by the National Insurance Administration and Statistics Norway. RESULTS: Birthweight below the standardized mean was associated with unemployment. The risk of unemployment increased by decreasing birthweight for both women and men and also after adjustment for potential confounding factors. The association was evident both in people with or without social disadvantage, as well as people with or without childhood disease. Still, birthweight below the standardized mean explained much less of the unemployment risk than did social disadvantage (attributable fractions 8.0% versus 28.3% for women and 10.0% versus 40.2% for men). CONCLUSION: Birthweight below the standardized mean was independently associated with unemployment at age 29, also in the normal birthweight range.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Epidemiol. 2004 Aug;33(4):856-715166198
PubMed ID
15166206 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dealing with emigration in cohort studies: follow-up of mortality and cancer incidence among Norwegians born between 1967 and 1976.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98446
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2010 Mar;25(3):155-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Petter Kristensen
Tor Bjerkedal
Author Affiliation
Institute of General Practice and Community Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2010 Mar;25(3):155-61
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Emigration and Immigration - trends
Female
Humans
Male
Mortality - trends
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
Emigration causes loss to follow-up. The study aim was to assess the influence of the choice of handling migration in population-based cohort studies on estimated mortality and cancer incidence in the population of origin. All persons born in Norway between 1967 and 1976 and who were not registered dead before 1992 (N = 614,176) were followed up in national registries regarding migration movements, death, and incident cancer between 1992 and 2004. A total of 40,366 (6.6%) of the study population had between 1 and 13 migration movements and 5,354 deaths and 4,447 first cancer cases were recorded during follow-up. Four different follow-up scenarios concerning migration were analysed: considering only person-time before emigration; considering person-time as national residents both before emigration and after repatriation; disregarding whether emigration took place or not; and excluding all who emigrated during follow-up. Mortality and cancer incidence rates were compared in Poisson regression models. Mortality and cancer incidence were only marginally influenced by choice of follow-up scenario. Mortality was higher after repatriation, in particular during the first year of follow-up (rate ratio 2.03; 95% confidence interval 1.02-4.03). This excess had little influence on total population rates. Cancer incidence was not affected by repatriation status. Mortality rates after repatriation were probably elevated because persons who expected to die shortly were more prone to return to their native country ("salmon bias"). The analytical choice concerning follow-up has little influence on outcome occurrences in populations with rather low migration rates. However, the best solution is apparently to censor out persons at the date of emigration in order to avoid salmon bias.
PubMed ID
20054612 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does the threshold for reporting musculoskeletal pain or the probability of attributing work-relatedness vary by socioeconomic position or sex?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112935
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2013 Aug;55(8):901-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Ingrid Sivesind Mehlum
Petter Kristensen
Kaj Bo Veiersted
Morten Wærsted
Laura Punnett
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology, National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway. ism@stami.no
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2013 Aug;55(8):901-9
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Pain Threshold - psychology
Probability
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To examine the effect of sex and socioeconomic position (SEP) on individuals' perceptions of pain and its work-relatedness.
We compared self-reported pain in neck-shoulder or arm with clinical diagnoses and workers' judgments of work-relatedness with physicians' assessments based on specific criteria, between sexes and high- and low-SEP participants in the Oslo Health Study (n = 217).
Clinical diagnoses were more frequent in low-SEP subjects than high-SEP subjects with pain and generally higher in women than in men. Pain attributed to work was more frequently assessed as work-related by the physicians in low-SEP subjects than high-SEP subjects and in men than in women of low SEP.
The threshold for reporting pain seemed higher in low-SEP subjects and among women. Physicians were more likely to agree with low-SEP workers about work-relatedness.
PubMed ID
23782954 View in PubMed
Less detail

Employment trends during preschool years among mothers of term singletons born with low birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268582
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2014 Nov;18(9):2195-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Lars Johan Hauge
Tom Kornstad
Ragnhild Bang Nes
Petter Kristensen
Lorentz M Irgens
Markus A Landolt
Leif T Eskedal
Margarete E Vollrath
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2014 Nov;18(9):2195-201
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Care - economics - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Disabled Children
Employment - economics - trends
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Low Birth Weight - physiology
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Registries
Women, Working - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Children born at term with low birth weight (LBW) are regarded growth restricted and are at particular risk of adverse health outcomes requiring a high degree of parental participation in the day-to-day care. This study examined whether their increased risk of special health care needs compared to other children may influence mothers' opportunities for participation in the labor market at different times after delivery. Data from 32,938 participants in the population-based Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study with singleton children born at term in 2004-2006 were linked to national registers in order to investigate the mothers' employment status when their children were 1-3 years in 2007 and 4-6 years in 2010. Children weighing less than two standard deviations below the gender-specific mean were defined as LBW children. Although not significantly different from mothers of children in the normal weight range, mothers of LBW children had the overall highest level of non-employment when the children were 1-3 years. At child age 4-6 years on the other hand, LBW was associated with an increased risk of non-employment (RR 1.39: 95 % CI 1.11-1.75) also after adjustment for factors associated with employment in general. In accordance with employment trends in the general population, our findings show that while mothers of normal birth weight children re-enter the labor market as their children grow older, mothers of LBW children born at term participate to a lesser extent in paid employment and remain at levels similar to those of mothers with younger children.
Notes
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2000 Jun;79(6):435-910857866
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009 Jan;163(1):19-2619124699
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2001 Dec;30(6):1233-4111821313
Cites: Milbank Q. 2002;80(2):303-2412101874
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2002 Sep;92(9):1453-712197972
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2003 May 15;157(10):940-312746247
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2003 Dec;57(11):2193-20514512249
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2004 Aug;33(4):849-5615166206
Cites: Pediatrics. 2009 Dec;124 Suppl 4:S392-819948604
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2010 Feb;70(4):631-4119939532
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Jul;116(1):136-920567179
Cites: Pediatrics. 2009 Aug;124(2):717-2819651588
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2009 Nov;23(6):597-60819840297
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Apr;204(4):288-30021215383
Cites: Matern Child Health J. 2011 Oct;15(7):836-4419902344
Cites: J Pediatr Health Care. 2012 Jul-Aug;26(4):283-9022726713
Cites: Pediatrics. 2012 Dec;130(6):e1629-3523166338
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2013 Jul;27(4):353-6023772937
Cites: Pediatrics. 1998 Jul;102(1 Pt 1):137-409714637
Cites: JAMA. 2005 Jul 20;294(3):318-2516030276
Cites: Epidemiology. 2006 May;17(3):252-416617271
Cites: Pediatrics. 2006 Jul;118(1):217-2316818568
Cites: Pediatrics. 2006 Oct;118(4):1600-617015552
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2006 Oct;35(5):1146-5016926217
Cites: J Intellect Disabil Res. 2006 Dec;50(Pt 12):963-917100956
Cites: Pediatrics. 2007 Mar;119(3):e562-7317332176
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2007;22(8):533-4317530421
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Jan 1;167(1):103-1117898000
Cites: Lancet. 2008 Jan 19;371(9608):261-918207020
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Apr 17;358(16):1700-1118420502
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Jul 17;359(3):262-7318635431
Cites: BJOG. 2008 Sep;115(10):1250-518715410
Cites: Matern Child Health J. 2008 Nov;12(6):679-8318060488
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2000 Jun;79(6):440-910857867
PubMed ID
24643811 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Employment trends--the impact of chronic disease in childhood and low educational level]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30030
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Nov 18;124(22):2879-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-18-2004
Author
Petter Kristensen
Tor Bjerkedal
Author Affiliation
Statens arbeidsmiljøinstitutt, Postboks 8149 Dep, 0033 Oslo. petter.kristensen@stami.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Nov 18;124(22):2879-83
Date
Nov-18-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Educational Status
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data - trends
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Socioeconomic Factors
Unemployment - psychology - statistics & numerical data - trends
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Our aim was to analyse long-term employment trends among disadvantaged groups on the assumption that they may be more exposed to unemployment during recessions or be at increasingly higher risk of unemployment because of stricter requirements in the workplace. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We established a cohort through links between data on individuals in national registers for all 321,975 men born 1967 through 1976. Disadvantaged groups under study were those receiving supplementary benefits in childhood because of chronic disease, and those with few educational attainments. Using Poisson regression we estimated associations with unemployment or disability over the course of the 1991-2001 period. RESULTS: Disadvantaged groups had higher risk of unemployment or disability. Associations between chronic disease in childhood and subsequent unemployment followed the business cycle; they were highest during the 1993 recession and lowest during the boom years around 1999. Over the long term, the gap in unemployment widened between those with low educational attainment and the better-educated. We found similar but less clear trends for disability. INTERPRETATION: The observed negative effect of chronic childhood disease on employment status paralleled the business cycle: it was weakest in boom years and strongest in recession years. Low educational attainment was associated with a gradual decline in the level of employment.
PubMed ID
15550956 View in PubMed
Less detail

Epidemiology of trauma: a population-based study of geographical risk factors for injury deaths in the working-age population of Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265282
Source
Injury. 2014 Jan;45(1):23-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Thomas Kristiansen
Hans Morten Lossius
Marius Rehn
Petter Kristensen
Hans Magne Gravseth
Jo Røislien
Kjetil Søreide
Source
Injury. 2014 Jan;45(1):23-30
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Primary Prevention
Registries
Risk factors
Rural Population
Self-Injurious Behavior - mortality
Sex Factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Wounds and Injuries - mortality - prevention & control
Abstract
Trauma is a major global cause of morbidity and mortality. Population-based studies identifying high-risk populations and regions may facilitate primary prevention and the development of optimal trauma systems. This study describes the epidemiology of adult trauma deaths in Norway and identifies high-risk areas by assessing different geographical measures of rurality.
All trauma-related deaths in Norway from 1998 to 2007 among individuals aged 16-66 years were identified by accessing national registries. Mortality data were analysed by linkage to population and geographical data at municipal, county and national levels. Three measures of rurality (centrality, population density and settlement density) were compared based on their association with trauma mortality rates.
The study included 8466 deaths, of which 78% were males. The national annual trauma mortality rate was 28.7 per 100,000. Population density was the best predictor of high-risk areas, and there was a consistent inverse relationship between mortality rates and population density. The most rural areas had 52% higher trauma mortality rates compared to the most urban areas. This difference was largely due to deaths following transport-related injury. Seventy-eight per cent of all deaths occurred in the prehospital phase. Rural areas and death following self-harm had higher proportion of prehospital deaths.
Rural areas, as defined by population density, are at a higher risk of deaths following traumatic injuries and have higher proportions of prehospital deaths and deaths following transport-related injuries. The heterogeneous characteristics of trauma populations with respect to geography and mode of injury should be recognised in the planning of preventive strategies and in the organisation of trauma care.
PubMed ID
23915491 View in PubMed
Less detail

The gender gap in sickness absence from work and the influence of parental absence on offspring absence 15 years later: register-based cohort of Norwegians born in 1974-1976.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269387
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:684
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Petter Kristensen
Karina Corbett
Ingrid Sivesind Mehlum
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:684
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Children - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Parents
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Women have shown consistently higher levels of sickness absence from work in comparison to men, but explanations for this gender gap have not been completely understood. Life-course studies suggest that health and health-related social benefits in adult age are influenced by early life experiences. We aimed to estimate intergenerational associations with a 15-year time gap between parents' and offspring sickness absences, pursuing the hypothesis that this parental influence would have a stronger impact for women than for men.
All persons born alive between 1974 and 1976 in Norway were followed up in several national registries. Employed persons considered to be at risk of sickness absence and also with parents at risk of sickness absence (n?=?78,878) were followed in the calendar year of their 33(rd) birthday with respect to spells lasting >16 days. The probability of one or more spells during this year constituted the one-year risk under study. Additive risk differences in association with an exposure (parental sickness absence 15 years earlier) were estimated in a binomial regression analysis. The estimates were adjusted for parental socioeconomic factors.
The 1-year sickness absence risk was higher for women (30.4%) than for men (12.3%). The crude risk differences between those exposed and those unexposed to parental sickness absence were similar in percentage points (PP) for women (3.8; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.6 to 4.9) and men (3.8; 95% CI 2.9 to 4.6). The risk differences were moderately attenuated after adjustment for parental education and father's income to 3.4 PP (2.2 to 4.5) for women and 2.8 PP (2.0 to 3.7) for men. Male absence was more strongly associated with the father's than with the mother's sickness absence, while associations for women were stronger for the same diagnostic groups as their parents.
Parental sickness absence was moderately associated with sickness absence in the next generation. Bias from unmeasured confounders cannot be entirely dismissed. Contrary to our hypothesis, associations were not stronger for women than for men. If parental sickness absence has a long-term causal effect, preventive measures could have an impact over generations.
Notes
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2008 Aug;36(6):564-7218775812
Cites: Psychol Health Med. 2009 Aug;14(4):405-1819697251
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2009 Sep;37(7):674-8119671769
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2010;11:2320122264
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2010 Sep;36(5):394-40320213051
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2010 Oct;20(5):517-2320584741
Cites: Epidemiology. 2011 Jan;22(1):42-5221052008
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2011 Sep;68(9):703-521441174
Cites: Twin Res Hum Genet. 2013 Aug;16(4):759-6623743022
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2013 Aug;23(4):635-4223302765
Cites: PLoS One. 2014;9(3):e9300624667483
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1999 Nov;156(11):1796-80010553745
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2000 Jun;50(12):1827-4210798335
Cites: BMJ. 2003 Jan 25;326(7382):21912543843
Cites: Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2004;63:49-10815513654
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1997 Jul;45(2):231-469225411
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2005 May;60(10):2261-7215748674
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2006 Jun;163(6):1001-816741200
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2007 Feb;64(3):646-5517088015
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2007;22(8):533-4317530421
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2008 May;65(5):325-3018252767
Cites: Depress Anxiety. 2008;25(8):653-6017941098
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2014 Jul;40(4):361-924691748
PubMed ID
26193933 View in PubMed
Less detail

28 records – page 1 of 3.