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A 2-year follow-up study of people with severe mental illness involved in psychosocial rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257843
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):401-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Petra Svedberg
Bengt Svensson
Lars Hansson
Henrika Jormfeldt
Author Affiliation
Petra Svedberg, Associate Professor, School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University , Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):401-8
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Mental health services
Middle Aged
Power (Psychology)
Prospective Studies
Psychotherapy - methods
Quality of Life
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUNDS. A focus on psychiatric rehabilitation in order to support recovery among persons with severe mental illness (SMI) has been given great attention in research and mental health policy, but less impact on clinical practice. Despite the potential impact of psychiatric rehabilitation on health and wellbeing, there is a lack of research regarding the model called the Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach from Boston University (BPR).
The aim was to investigate the outcome of the BPR intervention regarding changes in life situation, use of healthcare services, quality of life, health, psychosocial functioning and empowerment.
The study has a prospective longitudinal design and the setting was seven mental health services who worked with the BPR in the county of Halland in Sweden. In total, 71 clients completed the assessment at baseline and of these 49 completed the 2-year follow-up assessments.
The most significant finding was an improved psychosocial functioning at the follow-up assessment. Furthermore, 65% of the clients reported that they had mainly or almost completely achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals at the 2-year follow-up. There were significant differences with regard to health, empowerment, quality of life and psychosocial functioning for those who reported that they had mainly/completely had achieved their self-formulated rehabilitation goals compared to those who reported that they only had to a small extent or not at all reached their goals.
Our results indicate that the BPR approach has impact on clients' health, empowerment, quality of life and in particular concerning psychosocial functioning.
PubMed ID
24228778 View in PubMed
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The attitudes of patients and staff towards aspects of health promotion interventions in mental health services in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150313
Source
Health Promot Int. 2009 Sep;24(3):269-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Petra Svedberg
Lars Hansson
Bengt Svensson
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden. petra.svedberg@lthalland.se
Source
Health Promot Int. 2009 Sep;24(3):269-76
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Medical Staff - psychology
Mental health services
Middle Aged
Patients - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The present study investigates attitudes towards aspects of health promotion in mental health services, as rated by patients and staff. The aim of the study was to investigate similarities and differences in attitudes towards health promotion interventions among patients and staff in mental health services, using a newly developed questionnaire, the Health Promotion Intervention Questionnaire (HPIQ). The study has a cross-sectional design and a sample of 141 patients and 140 staff were recruited to the study. The response rate was 59% for the patients and 50% for the staff. The participants were asked to rate the attitudes of the 19 items included in the HPIQ. The result showed that patients and staff in some cases share similar attitudes regarding aspects of health promotion intervention. According to both groups, empowerment is the most important intervention in health promotion. Significant differences between the ratings of patients and staff appeared regarding all subscales of HPIQ. Patients rated alliance and educational support significantly higher than staff and staff-rated empowerment and practical support significantly higher than patients. Based on these findings, it is of importance to meet patients' desire for information and knowledge in an interactive manner with an empowerment approach to promote health in mental health services.
PubMed ID
19525504 View in PubMed
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Clients' experiences of the Boston Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256774
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014;9:22916
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Henrika Jormfeldt
Bengt Svensson
Lars Hansson
Petra Svedberg
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden; henrika.jormfeldt@hh.se.
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2014;9:22916
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Goals
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic - methods
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Mental health services
Patient satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Self Concept
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Trust
Young Adult
Abstract
The Boston Psychiatric Rehabilitation Approach (BPR) is person-centered and characterized by being based entirely on the individual's unique needs and preferences in the areas of working, learning, social contacts, and living environment. Nevertheless, the person-centered approach is lacking firm evidence regarding outcomes, and empirical studies regarding clients' experiences of this particular model are needed. A qualitative content analysis of 10 transcribed semistructured individual interviews was used to describe and explore clients' experiences of the BPR during an implementation project in Sweden. The findings from the interviews could be summarized in "A sense of being in communion with self and others" theme, consisting of three categories: increased self-understanding, getting new perspectives, and being in a trusting relationship. The results showed that clients do not always recognize nor are able to verbalize their goals before they have been given the possibility to reflect their thoughts in collaboration with a trusted person. The guidelines of the approach are intended to support the clients' ability to participate in decision making regarding their own care. More research about efficacy of different rehabilitation approaches and exploration of fidelity to guidelines of rehabilitation programs are required.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24717265 View in PubMed
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Establishing a recovery orientation in mental health services: Evaluating the Recovery Self-Assessment (RSA) in a Swedish context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276676
Source
Psychiatr Rehabil J. 2015 Dec;38(4):328-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
David Rosenberg
Petra Svedberg
Ulla-Karin Schön
Source
Psychiatr Rehabil J. 2015 Dec;38(4):328-35
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Mental Health Services - methods - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Patient Participation - methods - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Rehabilitation - methods - organization & administration
Psychometrics - methods - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Self-Assessment
Social Support
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Translating
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Although there has been an emphasis on developing knowledge regarding recovery in Sweden, it is unclear to what extent this has been translated into a recovery orientation in the provision of mental health services. Instruments, which present the components of recovery as measurable dimensions of change, may provide a framework for program development. Involving users is an essential factor in the utilization of such tools. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Recovery Self-Assessment (RSA) measure and its potential for being utilized in a Swedish context.
The sample consisted of 78 participants from 6 community mental health services targeting people with serious mental illnesses in a municipality in Sweden. They completed the RSA at the study baseline and two weeks later. User panels participated in the translation and administration of the RSA and the reporting of results.
The Swedish version of the RSA had good face and content validity, satisfactory internal consistency, and a moderate to good level of stability in test-retest reliability. The user panels contributed to establishing validity and as collaborators in the study.
Establishing the RSA as a valid and reliable instrument with which to focus on the recovery orientation of services is a first step in beginning to study the types of interventions that may effect and contribute to recovery oriented practice in Sweden.
PubMed ID
26053531 View in PubMed
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Evaluating the INSPIRE measure of staff support for personal recovery in a Swedish psychiatric context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268465
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2015 May;69(4):275-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Ulla-Karin Schön
Petra Svedberg
David Rosenberg
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2015 May;69(4):275-81
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Mental Health Services - standards
Female
Health Personnel - standards
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Middle Aged
Reproducibility of Results
Social Support
Surveys and Questionnaires - standards
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Recovery is understood to be an individual process that cannot be controlled, but can be supported and facilitated at the individual, organizational and system levels. Standardized measures of recovery may play a critical role in contributing to the development of a recovery-oriented system. The INSPIRE measure is a 28-item service user-rated measure of recovery support. INSPIRE assesses both the individual preferences of the user in the recovery process and their experience of support from staff.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the INSPIRE measure, for potential use in Swedish mental health services and in order to promote recovery in mental illness.
The sample consisted of 85 participants from six community mental health services targeting people with a diagnosis of psychosis in a municipality in Sweden. For the test-retest evaluation, 78 participants completed the questionnaire 2 weeks later.
The results in the present study indicate that the Swedish version of the INSPIRE measure had good face and content validity, satisfactory internal consistency and some level of instability in test-retest reliability.
While further studies that test the instrument in a larger and more diverse clinical context are needed, INSPIRE can be considered a relevant and feasible instrument to utilize in supporting the development of a recovery-oriented system in Sweden.
PubMed ID
25377024 View in PubMed
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Mental health professionals' attitudes towards people with mental illness: do they differ from attitudes held by people with mental illness?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130936
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2013 Feb;59(1):48-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Lars Hansson
Henrika Jormfeldt
Petra Svedberg
Bengt Svensson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. lars.hansson@med.lu.se
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2013 Feb;59(1):48-54
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Culture
Female
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Mental health services
Mentally Ill Persons - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient care team
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychotic Disorders - psychology - therapy
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Social Stigma
Stereotyping
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies investigating mental health professionals' attitudes towards people with mental illness are scarce and there is a lack of comparative studies including both patients' and mental health professionals' attitudes. The aim of the present study was to investigate mental health staff's attitudes towards people with mental illness and compare these with the attitudes of patients in contact with mental health services. A further aim was to relate staff attitudes to demographic and work characteristics.
A cross-sectional study was performed including 140 staff and 141 patients. The study included a random sample of outpatients in contact with mental health services in the southern part of Sweden and staff working in these services. Attitudes were investigated using a questionnaire covering beliefs of devaluation and discrimination of people with a mental illness.
Negative attitudes were prevalent among staff. Most negative attitudes concerned whether an employer would accept an application for work, willingness to date a person who had been hospitalized, and hiring a patient to take care of children. Staff treating patients with a psychosis or working in inpatient settings had the most negative attitudes. Patient attitudes were overall similar to staff attitudes and there were significant differences in only three out of 12 dimensions. Patients' most negative attitudes were in the same area as the staff's.
This study points to the suggestion that mental health care staff may hold negative attitudes and beliefs about people with mental illness with tentative implications for treatment of the patient and development and implementation of evidence-based services. Since patients and staff in most respects share these beliefs, it is essential to develop interventions that have an impact on both patients and staff, enabling a more recovery-oriented staff-patient relationship.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2013 Aug;59(5):52023887823
Comment In: Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2013 Aug;59(5):52223887825
PubMed ID
21954319 View in PubMed
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Perceptions of the concept of health among patients in mental health nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70909
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2004 Oct-Nov;25(7):723-36
Publication Type
Article
Author
Petra Svedberg
Henrika Jormfeldt
Bengt Fridlund
Barbro Arvidsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Petra.svedberg@lthalland.se
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2004 Oct-Nov;25(7):723-36
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Clinical Nursing Research
Female
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Personal Autonomy
Psychiatric Nursing
Quality of Life - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Health has been a central concept in nursing science since the 18th century but the holistic concept of health that includes both the body and the soul, still has to be clarified. The concept of health is often unclear and represents an unreachable ideal state that can be hard to use as a realistic goal in nursing care. The aim of this study was to describe how the patient perceives the concept of health in mental health nursing. Twelve patients with experience of mental health nursing were interviewed and the data were analyzed with a phenomenographic approach. The patients described nine different perceptions that were divided into three descriptive categories: autonomy, meaningfulness, and community. All of these are important to achieve health. There is ambiguity about the possibility to influence the concept of health. Health is described, on the one, hand as a prerequisite to experiencing freedom and finding meaning in life and, on the other hand, it is believed that the search for meaning and the courage to fight and try in spite of the disease is what leads to health. The patients' descriptions are mostly about things that they need in the present time to achieve health, but health as a process with growth and potential for development does not appear that clearly. One conclusion is that mental health nursing must deliver a more process-focused nursing care where the concept of health is visibly used as a goal for all nursing interventions.
PubMed ID
15371139 View in PubMed
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The perspective of children on factors influencing their participation in perioperative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273574
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2015 Oct;24(19-20):2945-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Carina Sjöberg
Helene Amhliden
Jens M Nygren
Susann Arvidsson
Petra Svedberg
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2015 Oct;24(19-20):2945-53
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Child
Decision Making
Emotions
Female
Humans
Male
Patient Participation
Perioperative Care
Sweden
Trust
Abstract
To describe the experiences of participation in perioperative care of 8- to 11-year-old children.
All children have the right to participate in decisions that affect them and have the right to express their views in all matters that concern them. Allowing children to be involved in their perioperative care can make a major difference in terms of their well-being by decreasing fear and anxiety and having more positive experiences. Taking the views of children into account and facilitating their participation could thus increase the quality of care.
Descriptive qualitative design.
The study was conducted in 2013 and data were collected by narrative interviews with 10 children with experience from perioperative care in Sweden. Qualitative content analysis was chosen to describe the variations, differences and similarities in children's experiences of participation in perioperative care.
The result showed that receiving preparatory information, lack of information regarding postoperative care and wanting to have detailed information are important factors for influencing children's participation. Interaction with healthcare professionals, in terms of being listened to, being a part of the decision-making and feeling trust, is important for children's participation in the decision-making process. Poor adaptation of the care environment to the children's needs, feeling uncomfortable while waiting and needs for distraction are examples of how the environment and the care in the operating theatre influence the children's experiences of participation.
Efforts should be made to improve children's opportunities for participation in the context of perioperative care and further research is needed to establish international standards for information strategies and care environment that promotes children's participation in perioperative care.
Nurse anaesthetists need to acquire knowledge and develop strategies for providing preparatory visits and information to children prior to surgery as well as reducing waiting times and creating environments with meaningful and tailored opportunities for distraction in perioperative care.
PubMed ID
26215896 View in PubMed
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Psychiatric service staff perceptions of implementing a shared decision-making tool: a process evaluation study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294680
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2018 Dec; 13(1):1421352
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Ulla-Karin Schön
Katarina Grim
Lars Wallin
David Rosenberg
Petra Svedberg
Author Affiliation
a School of Education, Health and Social Studies , Dalarna University , Falun , Sweden.
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2018 Dec; 13(1):1421352
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Decision Making
Female
Humans
Male
Mental disorders
Mental health services
Middle Aged
Patient Participation
Perception
Psychiatry
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Shared decision making, SDM, in psychiatric services, supports users to experience a greater sense of involvement in treatment, self-efficacy, autonomy and reduced coercion. Decision tools adapted to the needs of users have the potential to support SDM and restructure how users and staff work together to arrive at shared decisions. The aim of this study was to describe and analyse the implementation process of an SDM intervention for users of psychiatric services in Sweden.
The implementation was studied through a process evaluation utilizing both quantitative and qualitative methods. In designing the process evaluation for the intervention, three evaluation components were emphasized: contextual factors, implementation issues and mechanisms of impact.
The study addresses critical implementation issues related to decision-making authority, the perceived decision-making ability of users and the readiness of the service to increase influence and participation. It also emphasizes the importance of facilitation, as well as suggesting contextual adaptations that may be relevant for the local organizations.
The results indicate that staff perceived the decision support tool as user-friendly and useful in supporting participation in decision-making, and suggest that such concrete supports to participation can be a factor in implementation if adequate attention is paid to organizational contexts and structures.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29405889 View in PubMed
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Psychometric evaluation of a Swedish version of Minneapolis-Manchester quality of life-youth form and adolescent form.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114055
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2013;11:79
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Eva-Lena Einberg
Ibadete Kadrija
David Brunt
Jens N Nygren
Petra Svedberg
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad SE - 301 18, Sweden.
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2013;11:79
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - diagnosis - psychology
Psychometrics - standards
Quality of Life
Survivors - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
It has become important to measure long-term effects and quality of life in survivors of childhood cancer. The Minneapolis- Manchester Quality of Life (MMQL) instrument has been proven to better capture the quality of life (QoL) perspective of health than other instruments. The instrument has age appropriate versions and is therefore favourable for longitudinal studies of QoL of children surviving from cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of MMQL-Youth Form and the Adolescent Form focusing on: 1) face and content validity 2) the internal consistency and 3) the test-retest reliability.
The sample consisted of 950 pupils (11-16 years old) from 7 schools in the western Sweden who completed the questionnaire. For the test-retest evaluation 230 respondents completed the questionnaire two weeks later.
Face and content validity was supported and internal consistency was found to be acceptable for the total scale for both the MMQL-Youth Form (8-12 years of age) and the Adolescent Form (13-20 years of age). Test-retest reliability for the MMQL-Youth Form was moderate for 50% of the items and good for the remaining. For the MMQL-Adolescent Form the test-retest showed moderate or good agreement for 80% of the items and fair for 20%.
The result indicated that the Swedish version of the MMQL-Youth Form and Adolescent Form was valid and reliable in a sample of healthy children in a Swedish context. It is recommended to test the instrument among diverse samples of children such as survivors of childhood cancer in order to validate its usefulness in research and clinical settings.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23656858 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.