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The aetiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis over time in a hospital in Copenhagen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97946
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2010 Jan;57(1):A4103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Camilla Nøjgaard
Flemming Bendtsen
Peter Matzen
Ulrik Becker
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology, Hvidovre Hospital, Kettegård Alle 30, DK-2650 Hvidovre, Denmark. mille@dadlnet.dk
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2010 Jan;57(1):A4103
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Gallstones - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Pancreatitis, Alcoholic - epidemiology - etiology
Pancreatitis, Chronic - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The change in aetiology over time of acute and chronic pancreatitis has been sparsely described, as has also the validity of the diagnostic codes. The aim of the study was 1) to clarify whether the aetiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis changed during the period 1983-2005, and 2) to validate the diagnostic codes over time for acute and chronic pancreatitis registered in the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR) in the same period. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All admissions at Hvidovre Hospital coded in the NPR in 1983, 1994 and 2005 with a diagnosis of either acute or chronic pancreatitis were included. After exclusion of readmissions, the cohorts consisted of 92, 146 and 118 patients, respectively. Medical records from every admission were retrieved, the aetiology was assessed and the coding of the diagnoses was related to internationally approved criteria. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Gallstone disease significantly (p = 0.04) increased as the cause of acute pancreatitis over the 22-year period, while alcohol remained the major cause of chronic pancreatitis. The validity of the diagnoses for patients with acute pancreatitis varied between 51% and 73%, and for chronic pancreatitis between 63 and 78%.
PubMed ID
20175946 View in PubMed
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[Can we improve the quality of coloscopy?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18307
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Jun 9;165(24):2471
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-9-2003
Author
Peter Matzen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Jun 9;165(24):2471
Date
Jun-9-2003
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Colonoscopy - standards
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis
Denmark
Humans
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Notes
Comment On: Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Jun 9;165(24):2473-712872466
PubMed ID
12872465 View in PubMed
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Danish patients with chronic pancreatitis have a four-fold higher mortality rate than the Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98508
Source
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010 Apr;8(4):384-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Camilla Nøjgaard
Flemming Bendtsen
Ulrik Becker
Jens Rikardt Andersen
Claus Holst
Peter Matzen
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology, Hvidovre Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. mille@dadlnet.dk
Source
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010 Apr;8(4):384-90
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatitis, Chronic - mortality
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND & AIMS: We investigated mortality of patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP), compared with the Danish population and sought to determine whether clinical presentations of CP can be used in prognosis. We also investigated clinical factors associated with mortality and causes of death among these patients. METHODS: The Copenhagen Pancreatitis Study is a prospective study of patients admitted from 1977 to 1982 to the 5 main hospitals in Copenhagen with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis or CP. In 2008, follow-up data were collected from these patients from the Danish Registries; this subcohort comprised 290 patients with probable (n = 41) or definite CP (n = 249). RESULTS: The mortality of patients with definite CP was 4-fold that of the Danish population and significantly higher than that of patients with probable CP (P = .003; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21-2.57); patients with probable CP had a 2- to 3-fold higher mortality rate than the population. In patients with definite CP, factors significantly associated with mortality included non-employment (P = .015; 95% CI, 0.53-0.93), and being underweight (P = .020; 95% CI, 0.52-0.95). Sex, alcohol use, smoking, single versus co-living, exocrine insufficiency, diabetes, pancreatic calcification, CP inheritance, painless CP, acute exacerbation of CP, or surgery for CP had no impact on survival. The most frequent causes of death were digestive diseases (19.5%), malignancies (19.5%), and cardiovascular diseases (11.3%). CONCLUSIONS: Danish patients with definite CP had a 4-fold higher mortality rate compared with the background population and a higher mortality rate than patients with probable CP. Being nonemployed or underweight had significant impact on survival.
PubMed ID
20036762 View in PubMed
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[Etiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis over time at a hospital in Copenhagen]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97309
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 Feb 8;172(6):465
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-8-2010

Factors associated with long-term mortality in acute pancreatitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139169
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2011 Apr;46(4):495-502
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Camilla Nøjgaard
Peter Matzen
Flemming Bendtsen
Jens Rikardt Andersen
Erik Christensen
Ulrik Becker
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology, Hvidovre Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. mille@dadlnet.dk
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2011 Apr;46(4):495-502
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - etiology
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Amylases - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Complications
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Pancreatitis - diagnosis - mortality
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Knowledge of the long-term prognosis of acute pancreatitis (AP) is limited. The aims were to investigate: (1) prognostic factors associated with long-term mortality in patients with AP; (2) whether or not the level of serum (S-)amylase at admission had an impact on the prognosis; (3) causes of death in these patients.
During 1977-1982, patients who were admitted to the five main hospitals in Copenhagen with a diagnosis of AP or chronic pancreatitis (CP) were included in a prospective cohort, the Copenhagen Pancreatitis Study (CPS); in 2008, they were followed up by linkage to the Danish Registries. The analyzed subcohort consisted of 352 patients with probable AP (n = 54) or definite AP (n = 298).
Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that significant factors associated with mortality were age, alcohol, and diabetes, whereas female gender, co-living and employment were associated with better survival. The S-amylase level had no impact on mortality. The most frequent causes of death were cardiovascular diseases, digestive diseases, and malignancies.
Age, alcohol and diabetes had a significant impact on survival whereas the S-amylase level did not.
PubMed ID
21091094 View in PubMed
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Increased risk of intestinal cancer in Crohn's disease: a meta-analysis of population-based cohort studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16551
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2005 Dec;100(12):2724-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Tine Jess
Michael Gamborg
Peter Matzen
Pia Munkholm
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Gastroenterology C, Herlev University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2005 Dec;100(12):2724-9
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Crohn Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Intestinal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Male
Odds Ratio
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Survival Analysis
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The risk of intestinal malignancy in Crohn's disease (CD) remains uncertain since risk estimates vary worldwide. The global CD population is growing and there is a demand for better knowledge of prognosis of this disease. Hence, the aim of the present study was to conduct a meta-analysis of population-based data on intestinal cancer risk in CD. METHODS: The MEDLINE search engine and abstracts from international conferences were searched for the relevant literature by use of explicit search criteria. All papers fulfilling the strict inclusion criteria were scrutinized for data on population size, time of follow-up, and observed to expected cancer rates. STATA meta-analysis software was used to perform overall pooled risk estimates (standardized incidence ratio (SIR), observed/expected) and meta-regression analyses of the influence of specific variables on SIR. RESULTS: Six papers fulfilled the inclusion criteria and reported SIRs of colorectal cancer (CRC) in CD varying from 0.9 to 2.2. The pooled SIR for CRC was significantly increased (SIR, 1.9; 95% CI 1.4-2.5), as was the risk for colon cancer separately (SIR, 2.5; 95% CI 1.7-3.5). Regarding small bowel cancer, five studies reported SIRs ranging from 3.4 to 66.7, and the overall pooled estimate was 27.1 (95% CI 14.9-49.2). CONCLUSIONS: The present meta-analysis of intestinal cancer risk in CD, based on population-based studies only, revealed an overall increased risk of both CRC and small bowel cancer among patients with CD. However, some of the available data were several decades old, and future studies taking new treatment strategies into account are required.
PubMed ID
16393226 View in PubMed
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Progression from acute to chronic pancreatitis: prognostic factors, mortality, and natural course.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131193
Source
Pancreas. 2011 Nov;40(8):1195-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Camilla Nøjgaard
Ulrik Becker
Peter Matzen
Jens Rikardt Andersen
Claus Holst
Flemming Bendtsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology, Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark. mille@dadlnet.dk
Source
Pancreas. 2011 Nov;40(8):1195-200
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Pancreatitis - etiology - mortality - pathology
Pancreatitis, Alcoholic - complications - mortality
Pancreatitis, Chronic - etiology - mortality - pathology
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Abstract
Knowledge of the natural course of acute pancreatitis (AP) and risk of progression to chronic pancreatitis (CP) is limited. The aims were to describe: (1) the incidence of progression from AP to CP, (2) prognostic factors for progression, and (3) the natural course and mortality of progressive AP.
During 1977 to 1982, patients admitted to hospitals in Copenhagen with a diagnosis of AP or CP were included in a prospective cohort and followed up by the Danish registries in 2008. The subcohort analyses comprised 352 AP patients.
Progressive AP was found in 85 patients (24.1%) during follow-up; 48.2% developed from alcoholic AP, 47.0% from idiopathic AP, and 4.8% from other causes. The mortality rate for patients with progressive AP was 2.7 times higher than in patients with nonprogressive acute pancreatitis, and 5.3 to 6.5 times higher than in the background population. In Cox regression analyses corrected for age, only smoking was of significance for the progression from AP to CP.
Acute pancreatitis can progress to CP, not only from alcoholic but also from nonalcoholic AP. Smoking was the strongest risk factor associated with progression. The mortality rate for these patients was 5 to 6 times the mortality rate in the population.
PubMed ID
21926938 View in PubMed
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[The quality of colonoscopy in Denmark. Results from a European quality study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174762
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Apr 18;167(16):1733-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-18-2005
Author
Palle Nordblad Schmidt
Jane Møller Hansen
Peter Bytzer
Hans Jørgen Gyrtrup
Peter Matzen
Author Affiliation
H:S Hvidovre Hospital, Gastroenheden.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Apr 18;167(16):1733-7
Date
Apr-18-2005
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Colonoscopy - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Europe
Female
Gastroenterology - education
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Apr 18;167(16):172315898597
PubMed ID
15898601 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.