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34 records – page 1 of 4.

6-month CPAP-treatment in a young male patient with severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome - a case study from the couple's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165224
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):103-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Anders Broström
Peter Johansson
Jan Albers
Jan Wiberg
Eva Svanborg
Bengt Fridlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. andbr@imv.liu.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):103-12
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure - adverse effects - psychology
Cost of Illness
Fear
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Frustration
Humans
Male
Nursing Methodology Research
Obesity, Morbid - complications
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Snoring - etiology - psychology
Social Behavior
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - etiology - psychology
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is independently associated with an increased risk for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) can reduce mortality and morbidity, but low compliance rates are seen.
To explore and describe the experiences of CPAP-treatment in a young male patient with severe OSAS during a 6-month period from the couple's perspective. METHODS AND THE CASE: A single case study with a phenomenographic approach was employed. Diagnostic procedures of OSAS and initiation of treatment with Auto-CPAP, humidifier and a nasal mask were performed during 4 visits. Conceptions were collected at 4 different occasions during the 6-month period (before, and 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after treatment initiation) by means of interviews with a 33-year old male patient and his female partner.
Totally 17 different structural aspects were found to fluctuate during the 6-month period in relation to; influence of stressors, social reactions and adaptation to increase compliance.
An increased knowledge about the influence of stressors, the social reactions, and the adaptation can help healthcare personnel to identify and better understand concerns of other patients and spouses during different time phases of the initial 6-month period of CPAP-treatment.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):89-9018396463
PubMed ID
17291832 View in PubMed
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Association between quality of life and clinical parameters in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131735
Source
Leuk Lymphoma. 2012 Mar;53(3):441-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Peter Johansson
Ruben Mesa
Robyn Scherber
Johanna Abelsson
Jan Samuelsson
Gunnar Birgegård
Björn Andréasson
Author Affiliation
Medical Clinic, NU Hospital Organization, Uddevalla, Sweden. peter.l.johansson@vgregion.se
Source
Leuk Lymphoma. 2012 Mar;53(3):441-4
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anorexia - etiology - psychology
Fatigue - etiology - psychology
Female
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - classification - etiology - psychology
Myeloproliferative Disorders - blood - complications - psychology
Nervous System Diseases - etiology - psychology
Pain - etiology - psychology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological - etiology - psychology
Sweden
Weight Loss
Abstract
The Myeloproliferative Neoplasm Symptom Assessment Form (MPN-SAF) is a validated quality of life (QoL) instrument. In our Swedish cohort of 114 patients the symptomatic burden was found to be severe, with fatigue reported in 88% of the patients and reduced QoL in the majority of patients. Patients with primary myelofibrosis had the highest scores, low QoL, for most MPN-SAF items, compared to patients with polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia. Higher age showed significant associations with the BFI (Brief Fatigue Inventory) score, early satiety, concentration problems, dizziness, insomnia, cough and weight loss. Blood values, disease duration and myelosuppressive treatment did not significantly associate with any of the MPN-SAF items, with the exception of higher hemoglobin, which correlated with sad mood. Male patients with MPN scored significantly higher as regards sexual problems and weight loss compared to female patients. Overall, the MPN-SAF was found to be a valid instrument for assessing symptomatic burden among this population.
PubMed ID
21883029 View in PubMed
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The associations between psychological distress and healthcare use in patients with non-cardiac chest pain: does a history of cardiac disease matter?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299498
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2018 06 05; 18(1):172
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-05-2018
Author
Ghassan Mourad
Tiny Jaarsma
Anna Strömberg
Erland Svensson
Peter Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Kungsgatan 40, S-601 74, Norrköping, Sweden. ghassan.mourad@liu.se.
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2018 06 05; 18(1):172
Date
06-05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Anxiety - diagnosis - physiopathology
Chest Pain - diagnosis - psychology
Depression - diagnosis - physiopathology
Fear - physiology - psychology
Female
Health Services Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Heart Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Help-Seeking Behavior
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Health Questionnaire
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - physiopathology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Psychological distress such as somatization, fear of body sensations, cardiac anxiety and depressive symptoms is common among patients with non-cardiac chest pain, and this may lead to increased healthcare use. However, the relationships between the psychological distress variables and healthcare use, and the differences in relation to history of cardiac disease in these patients has not been studied earlier. Therefore, our aim was to explore and model the associations between different variables of psychological distress (i.e. somatization, fear of body sensations, cardiac anxiety, and depressive symptoms) and healthcare use in patients with non-cardiac chest pain in relation to history of cardiac disease.
In total, 552 patients with non-cardiac chest pain (mean age 64 years, 51% women) responded to the Patient Health Questionnaire-15, Body Sensations Questionnaire, Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and one question regarding number of healthcare visits. The relationships between the psychological distress variables and healthcare visits were analysed using Structural Equation Modeling in two models representing patients with or without history of cardiac disease.
A total of 34% of the patients had previous cardiac disease. These patients were older, more males, and reported more comorbidities, psychological distress and healthcare visits. In both models, no direct association between depressive symptoms and healthcare use was found. However, depressive symptoms had an indirect effect on healthcare use, which was mediated by somatization, fear of body sensations, and cardiac anxiety, and this effect was significantly stronger in patients with history of cardiac disease. Additionally, all the direct and indirect effects between depressive symptoms, somatization, fear of body sensations, cardiac anxiety, and healthcare use were significantly stronger in patients with history of cardiac disease.
In patients with non-cardiac chest pain, in particular those with history of cardiac disease, psychological mechanisms play an important role for seeking healthcare. Development of interventions targeting psychological distress in these patients is warranted. Furthermore, there is also a need of more research to clarify as to whether such interventions should be tailored with regard to history of cardiac disease or not.
PubMed ID
29866125 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular mortality and N-terminal-proBNP reduced after combined selenium and coenzyme Q10 supplementation: a 5-year prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial among elderly Swedish citizens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124080
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Sep 1;167(5):1860-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2013
Author
Urban Alehagen
Peter Johansson
Mikael Björnstedt
Anders Rosén
Ulf Dahlström
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. Urban.Alehagen@liu.se
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Sep 1;167(5):1860-6
Date
Sep-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - drug therapy - mortality
Cohort Studies
Dietary Supplements
Double-Blind Method
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Humans
Male
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - antagonists & inhibitors - biosynthesis - blood
Peptide Fragments - antagonists & inhibitors - biosynthesis - blood
Prospective Studies
Selenium - administration & dosage
Sweden - epidemiology
Ubiquinone - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Abstract
Selenium and coenzyme Q10 are essential for the cell. Low cardiac contents of selenium and coenzyme Q10 have been shown in patients with cardiomyopathy, but inconsistent results are published on the effect of supplementation of the two components separately. A vital relationship exists between the two substances to obtain optimal function of the cell. However, reports on combined supplements are lacking.
A 5-year prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial among Swedish citizens aged 70 to 88 was performed in 443 participants given combined supplementation of selenium and coenzyme Q10 or a placebo. Clinical examinations, echocardiography and biomarker measurements were performed. Participants were monitored every 6th month throughout the intervention. The cardiac biomarker N-terminal proBNP (NT-proBNP) and echocardiographic changes were monitored and mortalities were registered. End-points of mortality were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazard ratios were adjusted for potential confounding factors. Intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses were applied.
During a follow up time of 5.2 years a significant reduction of cardiovascular mortality was found in the active treatment group vs. the placebo group (5.9% vs. 12.6%; P=0.015). NT-proBNP levels were significantly lower in the active group compared with the placebo group (mean values: 214 ng/L vs. 302 ng/L at 48 months; P=0.014). In echocardiography a significant better cardiac function score was found in the active supplementation compared to the placebo group (P=0.03).
Long-term supplementation of selenium/coenzyme Q10 reduces cardiovascular mortality. The positive effects could also be seen in NT-proBNP levels and on echocardiography.
PubMed ID
22626835 View in PubMed
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Clinical characteristics and mortality risk in relation to obstructive and central sleep apnoea in community-dwelling elderly individuals: a 7-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125918
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Jul;41(4):468-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Peter Johansson
Urban Alehagen
Eva Svanborg
Ulf Dahlström
Anders Broström
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Linkoping University Hospital, Linkoping, Sweden. peter.johansson@aries.vokby.se
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Jul;41(4):468-74
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - physiopathology
Cause of Death
Comorbidity
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sleep
Sleep Apnea, Central - mortality - physiopathology
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - mortality - physiopathology
Stroke Volume
Sweden - epidemiology
Systole
Time Factors
Ventricular Function, Left
Abstract
little is known about demographic and clinical characteristics associated with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) or central sleep apnoea (CSA) in community-dwelling elderly. We also examined these (OSA and CSA) associations to all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality.
a total of 331 community-dwelling elderly aged 71-87 years underwent a clinical examination and one-night polygraphic recordings in their homes. Mortality data were collected after seven years.
a total of 55% had SDB, 38% had OSA and 17% had CSA. Compared with those with no SDB and OSA, more participants with CSA had a left ventricular ejection fraction 75 years does not appear to be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) disease or mortality, whereas CSA might be a pathological marker of CVD and impaired systolic function associated with higher mortality.
PubMed ID
22440587 View in PubMed
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The contribution of heart failure to sleep disturbances and depressive symptoms in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119220
Source
J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol. 2012 Sep;25(3):179-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Peter Johansson
Barbara Riegel
Erland Svensson
Anders Broström
Urban Alehagen
Ulf Dahlström
Tiny Jaarsma
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Linköping University Hospital, S-58185 Linköping, Sweden. peter.johansson@aries.vokby.se
Source
J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol. 2012 Sep;25(3):179-87
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comorbidity
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Electrocardiography - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Heart Failure - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore the associations between physical symptoms, sleep disturbances, and depressive symptoms in community-dwelling elderly individuals, comparing persons with and without heart failure (HF).
A total of 613 older adults (mean age 78 years) underwent clinical and echocardiographic examinations. Questionnaires were used to evaluate sleep disturbances and depressive symptoms. A model was developed in those with HF (n = 107) and compared with those without HF (n = 506).
Cardiopulmonary symptoms (ie, dyspnea and nighttime palpitations) and pain had significant direct associations with sleep disturbances, which indirectly affected depressive symptoms. The model was essentially the same in those with and without HF except that the effect of sleep disturbances on depressive symptoms was stronger in those with HF (ß = 0.64 vs ß = 0.45, P = .006).
In community-dwelling older adults, regardless of their diagnosis, physical symptoms had a direct effect on sleep disturbances and an indirect effect on depressive symptoms.
PubMed ID
23124012 View in PubMed
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Depressive Symptoms, Cardiac Anxiety, and Fear of Body Sensations in Patients with Non-Cardiac Chest Pain, and Their Relation to Healthcare-Seeking Behavior: A Cross-Sectional Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277354
Source
Patient. 2016 Feb;9(1):69-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Ghassan Mourad
Anna Strömberg
Peter Johansson
Tiny Jaarsma
Source
Patient. 2016 Feb;9(1):69-77
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - psychology
Chest Pain - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - psychology
Fear
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Patients with non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP) suffer from recurrent chest pain and make substantial use of healthcare resources.
To explore the prevalence of depressive symptoms, cardiac anxiety, and fear of body sensations in patients discharged with a NCCP diagnosis; and to describe how depressive symptoms, cardiac anxiety, and fear of body sensations are related to each other and to healthcare-seeking behavior.
Cross-sectional design. Data were collected between late October 2013 and early January 2014 in 552 patients with NCCP from four hospitals in southeast Sweden, using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire, and Body Sensations Questionnaire.
About 26 % (n = 141) of the study participants reported at least moderate depressive symptoms, 42 % (n = 229) reported at least moderate cardiac anxiety, and 62 % (n = 337) reported some degree of fear of body sensations. We found strong positive relationships between depressive symptoms and cardiac anxiety (r s = 0.49; P
PubMed ID
25840677 View in PubMed
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Determinants of global perceived health in community-dwelling elderly screened for heart failure and sleep-disordered breathing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100504
Source
J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2010 Sep-Oct;25(5):E16-26
Publication Type
Article
Author
Peter Johansson
Urban Alehagen
Erland Svensson
Eva Svanborg
Ulf Dahlström
Anders Broström
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden. peter.johansson@aries.vokby.se
Source
J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2010 Sep-Oct;25(5):E16-26
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Depression - epidemiology
Dyspnea - epidemiology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health status
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Quality of Life
Sleep Apnea Syndromes - epidemiology
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Systole
Abstract
The relationships between heart failure (HF), sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), insomnia, depressive symptoms, and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), as well as their relationship to Global Perceived Health (GPH) in an elderly community-dwelling population, have not been explored. Data from 331 community-dwelling elderly (71-87 years old) were collected by echocardiography, polygraphy, and specific questionnaires. Factor analyses and structural equation modeling were used to explore the relationships between HF, SDB, sleep, psychosocial factors, and GPH. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses derived a 5-factor model representing SDB, insomnia, systolic function, breathlessness/physical function, and psychosocial function. Structural equation modeling analyses were used to explore the relationships between the 5 factors and to GPH. Sleep-disordered breathing had a weak effect on systolic function, but no effects on any of the other factors or GPH were found. Psychosocial function and breathlessness/physical function directly affected GPH. Indirect effects on GPH, mediated by psychosocial function, were found for breathlessness/physical function and insomnia. Systolic function also had an indirect effect on GPH. The fact that SDB in the elderly has no obvious negative associations to sleep complaints or GPH does not exclude them from being adequately treated for SDB. However, the present study has shown that SDB, by means of self-rated sleep complaints and health-related quality of life, can be problematic to detect. Psychosocial function was the most important factor for perceived GPH as it had a direct effect, as well as mediated the factors breathlessness/physical function and insomnia effects, on GPH. This study indicates that interventions in clinical practice targeting psychosocial dysfunction, such as depressive symptoms, could help to improve GPH in the elderly with or without HF.
PubMed ID
20671565 View in PubMed
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Does cervical kyphosis relate to symptoms following whiplash injury?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137319
Source
Man Ther. 2011 Aug;16(4):378-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Mats Peter Johansson
Martin Skogheim Baann Liane
Tom Bendix
Helge Kasch
Alice Kongsted
Author Affiliation
Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
Source
Man Ther. 2011 Aug;16(4):378-83
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Female
Humans
Kyphosis - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Statistics, nonparametric
Whiplash Injuries - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology
Abstract
The mechanisms for developing long-lasting neck pain after whiplash injuries are still largely unrevealed. In the present study it was investigated whether a kyphotic deformity of the cervical spine, as opposed to a straight or a lordotic spine, was associated with the symptoms at baseline, and with the prognosis one year following a whiplash injury. MRI was performed in 171 subjects about 10 d after the accident, and 104 participated in the pain recording at 1-year follow-up. It was demonstrated that postures as seen on MRI can be reliably categorized and that a straight spine is the most frequent appearance of the cervical spine in supine MRI. In relation to symptoms it was seen that a kyphotic deformity was associated with reporting the highest intensities of headache at baseline, but not with an increased risk of long-lasting neck pain or headache. In conclusion, a kyphotic deformity is not significantly associated with chronic whiplash associated pain. Moreover, it is a clear clinical implication that pain should not be ascribed to a straight spine on MRI. We suggest that future trials on cervical posture focus upon the presence of kyphotic deformity rather than just on the absence of lordosis.
PubMed ID
21295511 View in PubMed
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34 records – page 1 of 4.