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An incident case-referent study on plasma enterolactone and breast cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18873
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2002 Aug;41(4):168-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Kerstin Hultén
Anna Winkvist
Per Lenner
Robert Johansson
Herman Adlercreutz
Göran Hallmans
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. kerstin.hulten@epiph.umu.se
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2002 Aug;41(4):168-76
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
4-Butyrolactone - analogs & derivatives - blood
Aging
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Lignans - blood
Questionnaires
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Using a nested case-referent design, we evaluated the relationship between plasma levels of the lignan enterolactone and the risk of developing breast cancer. METHODS: 248 cases and 492 referents were selected from three population-based cohorts in northern Sweden. Blood samples were donated at enrollment. All blood samples were stored at -80 degrees C. Cases and referents were matched for age, date of blood sample and sampling centre. Breast cancer cases were identified through the regional and national cancer registries. RESULTS: Plasma enterolactone was lower among smokers in all cohorts and in subjects with BMI 28 in one of the cohorts. Low plasma concentrations of enterolactone, below the 12.5(th) percentile (mean plasma enterolactone 2.9 nmol/l), were associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Also, high values of plasma enterolactone, above the 87.5(th) percentile (mean plasma enterolactone 58.2 nmol/l) were significantly associated with an increased breast cancer risk among women from two cohorts with only incident cases and a higher number of pre-menopausal women. High plasma enterolactone concentrations among older women from a mammary screening project with mostly prevalent cases were associated with a non-significant slightly reduced breast cancer risk. CONCLUSION: Very low plasma concentrations of enterolactone were associated with an increased breast cancer risk in all three cohorts. In two of the cohorts, with only incident cases, very high plasma concentrations were also associated with an increased breast cancer risk. In the third cohort with mainly screen-detected cases from a mammary screening program, high plasma enterolactone concentrations were associated with a weak decreased breast cancer risk.
PubMed ID
12242585 View in PubMed
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Blood levels of cadmium and lead in relation to breast cancer risk in three prospective cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299886
Source
Int J Cancer. 2019 03 01; 144(5):1010-1016
Publication Type
Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Date
03-01-2019
Author
Mia M Gaudet
Emily L Deubler
Rachel S Kelly
W Ryan Diver
Lauren R Teras
James M Hodge
Keith E Levine
Laura G Haines
Thomas Lundh
Per Lenner
Domenico Palli
Paolo Vineis
Ingvar A Bergdahl
Susan M Gapstur
Soterios A Kyrtopoulos
Author Affiliation
Behavioral and Epidemiology Research Group, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2019 03 01; 144(5):1010-1016
Date
03-01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - blood - etiology
Cadmium - blood
Carcinogens - toxicity
Case-Control Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Italy
Lead - blood
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Cadmium and lead have been classified as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. However, their associations with breast cancer risk are unknown despite their persistence in the environment and ubiquitous human exposure. We examined associations of circulating levels of cadmium and lead with breast cancer risk in three case-control studies nested within the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II) LifeLink Cohort, European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition - Italy (EPIC-Italy) and the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study (NSHDS) cohorts. Metal levels were measured in stored erythrocytes from 1,435 cases and 1,433 controls using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Summary relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using random-effects models with each study result weighted by the within- and between-study variances. I2 values were calculated to estimate proportion of between study variation. Using common cut-points, cadmium levels were not associated with breast cancer risk in the CPS-II cohort (continuous RR = 1.01, 95% CI 0.76-1.34), but were inversely associated with risk in the EPIC- Italy (continuous RR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.61-1.03) and NSHDS cohorts (continuous RR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.54-0.97). The inverse association was also evident in the meta-analysis (continuous RR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.69-1.01) with low between-study heterogeneity. Large differences in lead level distributions precluded a meta-analysis of their association with breast cancer risk; no associations were found in the three studies. Adult cadmium and lead levels were not associated with higher risk of breast cancer in our large meta-analysis.
PubMed ID
30117163 View in PubMed
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Body mass index and cancer: results from the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16857
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Jan 15;118(2):458-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-2006
Author
Annekatrin Lukanova
Ove Björ
Rudolf Kaaks
Per Lenner
Bernt Lindahl
Göran Hallmans
Pär Stattin
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Jan 15;118(2):458-66
Date
Jan-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Obesity - complications
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Excess weight has been associated with increased risk of cancer. The effect of body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) on overall cancer risk and on risk of developing several common cancer types was examined in a population-based cohort study. Height and weight measurements were available for 35,362 women and 33,424 men recruited in the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Cohort between 1985 and 2003. Among cohort members, 2,691 incident cancer cases were identified. The association of BMI with cancer risk was examined using Poisson regression. Women with BMI > 27.1 (top quartile) had a 29% higher risk of developing any malignancy compared to women with BMI of 18.5-22.2 (lowest quartile), which increased to 47% in analysis limited to nonsmokers. Analyses according to WHO cut-off points showed that obese women (BMI > or = 30) had a 36% higher risk of cancer than women with BMI in the normal range (18.5-25). Individual cancer sites most strongly related to obesity were endometrium (risk for top quartile = 3.53, 95% confidence interval 1.86-7.43), ovary (2.09, 1.13-4.13) and colon (2.05, 1.04-4.41). BMI was inversely related to breast cancer occurring before age 49 (0.58, 0.29-1.11, p(trend) or = 30), however, were at increased risk of developing kidney cancer (3.63, 1.23-10.7) and, after exclusion of cases diagnosed within 1 year of recruitment, colon cancer (1.77, 1.04-2.95). Our study provides further evidence that BMI is positively associated with cancer risk. In women from northern Sweden, up to 7% of all cancers were attributable to overweight and obesity and could be avoided by keeping BMI within the recommended range.
PubMed ID
16049963 View in PubMed
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Body mass index in relation to ovarian cancer: a multi-centre nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19143
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 Jun 1;99(4):603-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2002
Author
Annekatrin Lukanova
Paolo Toniolo
Eva Lundin
Andrea Micheli
Arslan Akhmedkhanov
Paola Muti
Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte
Carine Biessy
Per Lenner
Vittorio Krogh
Franco Berrino
Goran Hallmans
Elio Riboli
Rudolf Kaaks
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition and Cancer, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon, France. lukanova@iarc.fr
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 Jun 1;99(4):603-8
Date
Jun-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body Height
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Obesity
Odds Ratio
Ovarian Neoplasms - pathology
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Abstract
The incidence of ovarian cancer is up to 10 times higher in Western countries than in rural Asia and Africa. One common consequence of a Western lifestyle is the development of excessive body weight and obesity. A multi-centre prospective study was conducted to investigate the association between body mass index (BMI) and ovarian cancer risk. A case-control study was nested within 3 prospective cohorts in New York (USA), Umeå (Sweden) and Milan (Italy). Information on anthropometry, demographic characteristics, medical history and lifestyle was obtained at the time of subjects' recruitment in each cohort. Women diagnosed with primary, invasive epithelial ovarian cancer from the 3 cohorts (n = 122) diagnosed 12 months or later after recruitment into the respective cohort served as case subjects. For each case subject, 2 control subjects that matched the case subject on cohort, menopausal status, age and date of recruitment were randomly identified. Data were analyzed by conditional logistic regression. There was an inverse association between BMI and ovarian cancer risk. For increasing quartiles of BMI above the lowest, the ORs were 0.62 (0.32-1.21), 0.59 (0.30-1.17) and 0.46 (0.23-0.92), p = 0.03. Analyses limited to women diagnosed 3 or more years after recruitment into the cohorts did not alter these findings. When obese women (BMI > 30) were compared to lean women (BMI
PubMed ID
11992553 View in PubMed
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Circulating levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of breast cancer: a nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261129
Source
Breast Cancer Res. 2013;15(1):R15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Stephanie Scarmo
Yelena Afanasyeva
Per Lenner
Karen L Koenig
Ronald L Horst
Tess V Clendenen
Alan A Arslan
Yu Chen
Göran Hallmans
Eva Lundin
Sabina Rinaldi
Paolo Toniolo
Roy E Shore
Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte
Source
Breast Cancer Res. 2013;15(1):R15
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - pathology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Premenopause - blood
Risk factors
Sweden
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
Experimental evidence suggests a protective role for circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) in breast cancer development, but the results of epidemiological studies have been inconsistent.
We conducted a case-control study nested within two prospective cohorts, the New York University Women's Health Study and the Northern Sweden Mammary Screening Cohort. Blood samples were collected at enrollment, and women were followed up for breast cancer ascertainment. In total, 1,585 incident breast cancer cases were individually-matched to 2,940 controls. Of these subjects, 678 cases and 1,208 controls contributed two repeat blood samples, at least one year apart. Circulating levels of 25(OH)D were measured, and multivariate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using conditional logistic regression.
No association was observed between circulating levels of 25(OH)D and overall breast cancer risk (multivariate-adjusted model OR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.76-1.16 for the highest vs. lowest quintile, ptrend = 0.30). The temporal reliability of 25(OH)D measured in repeat blood samples was high (intraclass correlation coefficients for season-adjusted 25(OH)D > 0.70). An inverse association between 25(OH)D levels and breast cancer risk was observed among women who were = 45 years of age (ORQ5-Q1 = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.30-0.79, ptrend = 0.01) or premenopausal at enrollment (ORQ5-Q1 = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.48-0.92, ptrend = 0.03).
Circulating 25(OH)D levels were not associated with breast cancer risk overall, although we could not exclude the possibility of a protective effect in younger women. Recommendations regarding vitamin D supplementation should be based on considerations other than breast cancer prevention.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23442740 View in PubMed
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Circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor-I and risk of ovarian cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18876
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 Oct 20;101(6):549-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-2002
Author
Annekatrin Lukanova
Eva Lundin
Paolo Toniolo
Andrea Micheli
Arslan Akhmedkhanov
Sabina Rinaldi
Paola Muti
Per Lenner
Carine Biessy
Vittorio Krogh
Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte
Franco Berrino
Göran Hallmans
Elio Riboli
Rudolf Kaaks
Author Affiliation
Hormones and Cancer Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 Oct 20;101(6):549-54
Date
Oct-20-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Case-Control Studies
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - blood - diagnosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, a mitogenic and anti-apoptotic peptide, has been implicated in the development of several cancers. We hypothesized that high circulating IGF-I concentrations may be associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer. A case-control study was nested within 3 prospective cohorts in New York (USA), Ume? (Sweden) and Milan (Italy). One hundred thirty-two women with primary invasive epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosed at least 1 year after blood donation were case subjects. For each case, 2 control subjects were selected, matching the case subject on cohort, menopausal status, age and date of recruitment (n = 263). Only women who did not use exogenous hormones at blood donation were included in the study. There was no association between IGF-I concentrations and ovarian cancer risk in the study group as a whole. In analyses restricted to subjects who had developed ovarian cancer at a young age (
PubMed ID
12237896 View in PubMed
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Circulating levels of sex steroid hormones and risk of endometrial cancer in postmenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18065
Source
Int J Cancer. 2004 Jan 20;108(3):425-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-2004
Author
Annekatrin Lukanova
Eva Lundin
Andrea Micheli
Alan Arslan
Pietro Ferrari
Sabina Rinaldi
Vittorio Krogh
Per Lenner
Roy E Shore
Carine Biessy
Paola Muti
Elio Riboli
Karen L Koenig
Mortimer Levitz
Pär Stattin
Franco Berrino
Göran Hallmans
Rudolf Kaaks
Paolo Toniolo
Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2004 Jan 20;108(3):425-32
Date
Jan-20-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Disease Susceptibility
Endometrial Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology
Female
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness
New York - epidemiology
Postmenopause
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Experimental and epidemiological data support a role for sex steroid hormones in the pathogenesis of endometrial cancer. The associations of pre-diagnostic blood concentrations of estradiol, estrone, testosterone, androstenedione, DHEAS and SHBG with endometrial cancer risk were investigated. A case-control study was nested within 3 cohorts in New York (USA), Ume? (Sweden) and Milan (Italy). Cases were 124 postmenopausal women with invasive endometrial cancer. For each case, 2 controls were selected, matching the case on cohort, age and date of recruitment. Only postmenopausal women who did not use exogenous hormones at the time of blood donation were included. Odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by conditional logistic regression. ORs (95% CI) for endometrial cancer for quartiles with the highest hormone levels, relative to the lowest were as follows: 4.13 (1.76-9.72), p(trend) = 0.0008 for estradiol, 3.67 (1.71-7.88), p(trend) = 0.0007 for estrone, 2.15 (1.05-4.40), p(trend) = 0.04 for androstenedione, 1.74 (0.88-3.46), p(trend) = 0.06 for testosterone, 2.90 (1.42-5.90), p(trend) = 0.002 for DHEAS and 0.46 (0.20-1.05), p(trend) = 0.01 for SHBG after adjustment for body mass index, use of oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy. The results of our multicenter prospective study showed a strong direct association of circulating estrogens, androgens and an inverse association of SHBG levels with endometrial cancer in postmenopausal women. The effect of elevated androstenedione and testosterone levels on disease risk seems to be mediated mainly through their conversion to estrogens, although an independent effect of androgens on tumor growth cannot be ruled out, in particular in the years close to diagnosis.
PubMed ID
14648710 View in PubMed
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Circulating levels of sex steroid hormones and risk of ovarian cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18602
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 May 1;104(5):636-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2003
Author
Annekatrin Lukanova
Eva Lundin
Arslan Akhmedkhanov
Andrea Micheli
Sabina Rinaldi
Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte
Per Lenner
Paola Muti
Carine Biessy
Vittorio Krogh
Franco Berrino
Göran Hallmans
Elio Riboli
Rudolf Kaaks
Paolo Toniolo
Author Affiliation
Hormones and Cancer Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 May 1;104(5):636-42
Date
May-1-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Middle Aged
New York - epidemiology
Ovarian Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Experimental and epidemiological evidence supports a role for sex steroid hormones in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. We investigated the association between ovarian cancer risk and pre-diagnostic blood concentrations of testosterone, androstenedione, DHEAS, estrone and SHBG. A case-control study nested within 3 cohorts, in New York (USA), Umeå (Sweden) and Milan (Italy), included 132 subjects with primary invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. For each case subject, 2 controls were selected who matched a case on cohort, menopausal status, age and date of recruitment and, if premenopausal, day of the menstrual cycle at blood donation. Only women who did not use exogenous hormones at blood donation were included in the study. Conditional logistic regression was used to relate cancer risk to sex steroid hormone concentrations with adjustment for potential confounders. No clear association was observed between ovarian cancer risk and any of the 5 hormones under study. In the premenopausal group, the risk appeared to increase with increasing blood concentrations of androstenedione (upper vs. lower tertile OR = 2.35; 95% CI = 0.81-6.82.), but the small number of subjects in the sub-group precluded reaching unambiguous conclusions about such association. Our study does not support previous observations relating elevations in blood levels of the major sex steroid hormones to an increased risk of ovarian cancer, but offers some evidence that elevated circulating androstenedione before menopause may be associated with increased ovarian cancer risk.
PubMed ID
12594820 View in PubMed
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Circulating soluble Fas levels and risk of ovarian cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18009
Source
BMC Cancer. 2003 Dec 22;3:33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-22-2003
Author
Arslan Akhmedkhanov
Eva Lundin
Seth Guller
Annekatrin Lukanova
Andrea Micheli
Yuehong Ma
Yelena Afanasyeva
Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte
Vittorio Krogh
Per Lenner
Paola Muti
Sabina Rinaldi
Rudolf Kaaks
Franco Berrino
Göran Hallmans
Paolo Toniolo
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. akhmea01@med.nyu.edu
Source
BMC Cancer. 2003 Dec 22;3:33
Date
Dec-22-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antigens, CD95 - blood
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - blood
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Dysregulation of apoptosis, specifically overexpression of soluble Fas (sFas), has been proposed to play a role in the development of ovarian cancer. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate serum sFas as a potential biomarker of ovarian cancer risk. METHODS: The association between serum sFas levels and the risk of ovarian cancer was examined in a case-control study nested within three prospective cohorts in New York (USA), Umeå (Sweden), and Milan (Italy). Case subjects were 138 women with primary invasive epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosed between 2 months and 13.2 years after the initial blood donation. Control subjects were 263 women who were free of cancer, and matched the case on cohort, menopausal status, age, and enrollment date. Serum sFas levels were determined using a quantitative sandwich enzyme immunoassay. RESULTS: Serum sFas levels were similar in women subsequently diagnosed with ovarian cancer (median, 6.5 ng/mL; range, 4.4-10.2) and in controls (median, 6.8 ng/mL; range, 4.5-10.1). Statistically significant trends of increasing serum sFas with age were observed among cases (r = 0.39, p
PubMed ID
14690548 View in PubMed
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Comments to the letters by Per-Henrik Zahl and Jan Maehlen and by Peter C. Gotzsche concerning our article: Increased incidence of invasive breast cancer after the introduction of service screening with mammography in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16587
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 May 15;118(10):2649
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2006
Author
Håkan Jonsson
Robert Johansson
Per Lenner
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 May 15;118(10):2649
Date
May-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
No abstract.
PubMed ID
16353150 View in PubMed
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36 records – page 1 of 4.