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Associations of Age, Gender, and Subtypes With ADHD Symptoms and Related Comorbidity in a Danish Sample of Clinically Referred Adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286222
Source
J Atten Disord. 2016 Nov;20(11):925-933
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Helle Moeller Soendergaard
Per Hove Thomsen
Erik Pedersen
Pernille Pedersen
Agnethe Elkjaer Poulsen
Lars Winther
Jette Moeskjaer Nielsen
Anne Henriksen
Berit Rungoe
Hans Joergen Soegaard
Source
J Atten Disord. 2016 Nov;20(11):925-933
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Hyperkinesis
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Odds Ratio
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The aim was to examine associations of age and gender with ADHD subtypes and subsequently to examine associations of age, gender, and subtypes with comorbid psychiatric disorders.
Odds ratios were calculated and logistic regression performed using information from a clinical sample of 155 ADHD adults referred to a Danish specialized ADHD unit from 2010 to 2011.
A majority of men (65%) was found in the sample. Most patients were subtyped ADHD combined (78%), followed by ADHD inattentive (18%), and ADHD hyperactive-impulsive (4%). No significant differences were found in gender and age across subtypes. Current comorbid disorders were found in 57% of the ADHD patients. Significantly more comorbidity was found in the ADHD combined type and in patients =25 years. Significantly more men had substance use disorders and significantly more women had personality disorders.
When assessing adult ADHD patients' age, gender, subtype, and related comorbid symptom profiles should be taken into account.
PubMed ID
24412968 View in PubMed
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[Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Danish Society of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Denmark]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29770
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Mar 21;167(12-13):1379
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-21-2005
Author
Per Hove Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Børne-& Ungdomspsykiatrisk Hospital, Arhus Universitetshospital, DK-8240 Risskov. pht@buh.aaa.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Mar 21;167(12-13):1379
Date
Mar-21-2005
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychiatry
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Child
Child Psychiatry
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Societies, Medical
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 May 16;167(20):2202; author reply 2202-315987087
PubMed ID
15832700 View in PubMed
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Children and adolescents in the Psychiatric Emergency Department: a 10-year survey in Copenhagen County.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257845
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):385-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Annette Taastrøm
Julie Klahn
Nina Staal
Per Hove Thomsen
Anders Johansen
Author Affiliation
Centre for Child and Adolescents Psychiatry , Glostrup, Copenhagen , Denmark.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):385-90
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Emergencies
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - utilization
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Suicidal ideation
Suicide, Attempted - psychology
Abstract
Knowledge on psychiatric emergencies in children and adolescents is limited. The Psychiatric Emergency Departments (PED) in Copenhagen enable the acute examination of children and adolescents 24 h a day, 7 days a week. However, very little is known about who presents to the PED, and the reason for their visit.
To describe the prevalence and characteristics of presentations in PED and treatment provided.
A retrospective population based study comprising data of more than 4000 visitors presenting to PED from 2001-2010. In 2003 and 2006, two randomly chosen years, a more thorough analysis was performed, based on the individual emergency charts. Inter-rater reliability was high.
Visits increased nearly threefold during the period. Symptom score for 2003 and 2006 revealed that more than one third of the visitors had suicidal ideation. Depressive and anxiety symptoms together with suicidal ideation rose significantly (P
PubMed ID
24161251 View in PubMed
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The Children's Depression Inventory and classification of major depressive disorder: validity and reliability of the Danish version.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29408
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;14(6):328-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Merete Juul Sørensen
Morten Frydenberg
Mikael Thastum
Per Hove Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Harald Selmersvej 66, 8240 Risskov, Denmark. mjs@buh.aaa.dk
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;14(6):328-34
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark
Depressive Disorder, Major - classification - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The study examines the validity and reliability of the Danish version of the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) in a child psychiatric population. Participants were 149 child psychiatric patients aged 8-13 and their parents. After diagnostic interview with the Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia, the children completed the CDI. A subgroup of 44 children repeated the CDI after 2 weeks. The psychometric properties of the Danish CDI were similar to those reported for the English version. CDI is moderately correlated with other measures for depressive disorder, but the instrument is not sufficiently reliable or valid to be used as a single diagnostic or screening measure in a child psychiatric population.
PubMed ID
16220217 View in PubMed
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Continued cognitive-behavior therapy versus sertraline for children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder that were non-responders to cognitive-behavior therapy: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267806
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2015 May;24(5):591-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Gudmundur Skarphedinsson
Bernhard Weidle
Per Hove Thomsen
Kitty Dahl
Nor Christian Torp
Judith B Nissen
Karin Holmgren Melin
Katja Hybel
Robert Valderhaug
Tore Wentzel-Larsen
Scott N Compton
Tord Ivarsson
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2015 May;24(5):591-602
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cognitive Therapy
Combined Modality Therapy
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - drug therapy - psychology - therapy
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Sertraline - therapeutic use
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Expert guidelines recommend cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) as a first-line treatment in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and the addition of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors when CBT is not effective. However, the recommendations for CBT non-responders are not supported by empirical data. Our objective was to investigate the effectiveness of sertraline (SRT) versus continued CBT in children and adolescents that did not respond to an initial course of CBT. Randomized controlled trial conducted in five sites in Denmark, Sweden and Norway, 54 children and adolescents, age 7-17 years, with DSM-IV primary OCD were randomized to SRT or continued CBT for 16 weeks. These participants had been classified as non-responders to CBT following 14 weekly sessions. Primary outcomes were the CY-BOCS total score and clinical response (CY-BOCS
Notes
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PubMed ID
25239489 View in PubMed
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Developmental course of anxiety and depression from adolescence to young adulthood in a prospective Norwegian clinical cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296643
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2018 Nov; 27(11):1413-1423
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Ingunn Ranøyen
Stian Lydersen
Tricia L Larose
Bernhard Weidle
Norbert Skokauskas
Per Hove Thomsen
Jan Wallander
Marit S Indredavik
Author Affiliation
Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Department of Mental Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. ingunn.ranoyen@ntnu.no.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2018 Nov; 27(11):1413-1423
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age of Onset
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Comorbidity
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Phobic Disorders - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
Anxiety and depression are often co-occurring disorders, reflecting both homotypic and heterotypic continuity as possible developmental pathways. The present study aimed to examine homotypic and heterotypic continuities of anxiety and depression across 3 years in adolescence and young adulthood. Participants included patients presenting to psychiatric care with diagnoses of anxiety and/or depressive disorders aged 13-18 at T1 (N = 717, 44% initial participation rate) and aged 16-21 at T2 (N = 549, 80% follow-up participation rate). McNemar's mid-p test and ordinal proportional odds logistic regression analyses were used to assess changes in prevalence within and across diagnostic categories, respectively. More adolescents had an anxiety disorder (+ 11%), whereas fewer had a depressive disorder (- 11%), at T2 compared to T1. Of adolescents with anxiety and/or depression at T1, only 25% recovered or were non-symptomatic 3 years after referral to a psychiatric clinic. Homotypic continuity was observed for anxiety disorders in general (OR = 2.33), for phobic anxiety disorders (OR = 7.45), and for depressive disorders (OR = 2.15). For heterotypic continuity, depression predicted later anxiety (OR = 1.92), more specifically social anxiety (OR = 2.14) and phobic anxiety disorders (OR = 1.83). In addition, social anxiety predicted later generalized anxiety disorder (OR = 3.11). Heterotypic continuity was thus more common than homotypic continuity. For adolescents presenting with anxiety or depression, treatment should, therefore, target broad internalizing symptom clusters, rather than individual diagnoses. This may contribute to prevent future mental illness, particularly anxiety, in clinical samples.
PubMed ID
29502316 View in PubMed
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Does children's watching of television cause attention problems? Retesting the hypothesis in a Danish cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30050
Source
Pediatrics. 2004 Nov;114(5):1372-3; author reply 1373-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004

DSM-IV or ICD-10-DCR diagnoses in child and adolescent psychiatry: does it matter?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29407
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;14(6):335-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Merete Juul Sørensen
Ole Mors
Per Hove Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Harald Selmersvej 66, 8240, Risskov, Denmark.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;14(6):335-40
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - classification - diagnosis
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - classification - diagnosis
Child
Comparative Study
Denmark
Depression - classification - diagnosis
Depressive Disorder, Major - classification - diagnosis
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
International Classification of Diseases - statistics & numerical data
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mental Disorders - classification - diagnosis
Patient Admission
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: DSM-IV is the most widely used diagnostic classification system in research, whereas ICD-10 is more widely used clinically. Knowledge of differences is essential when research findings are implemented in daily clinical practice. We examined differences between the two diagnostic systems regarding three major child psychiatric diagnostic categories. METHODS: A total of 199 consecutively referred, child psychiatric patients were interviewed with a semistructured diagnostic interview (K-SADS-PL) including questions covering specific ICD-10-DCR criteria, and diagnosed according to both diagnostic systems. RESULTS: Differences were found regarding the diagnoses major depressive disorder/depressive episode and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder/disturbance of activity and attention. In both cases, more children met DSM-IV-TR criteria than ICD-10-DCR criteria. The diagnosis, oppositional defiant disorder, proved interchangeable between the two diagnostic systems. CONCLUSION: Differences between diagnostic systems must be taken into account when research findings using one diagnostic system are implemented with children diagnosed by another diagnostic system.
PubMed ID
16220218 View in PubMed
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Editorial for nordic journal of psychiatry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97072
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 May 4;64(3):146
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-4-2010

Education, occupation and risk-taking behaviour among adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268288
Source
Dan Med J. 2015 Mar;62(3)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Helle Moeller Soendergaard
Per Hove Thomsen
Pernille Pedersen
Erik Pedersen
Agnethe Elkjaer Poulsen
Jette Moeskjaer Nielsen
Lars Winther
Anne Henriksen
Berit Rungoe
Hans Joergen Soegaard
Source
Dan Med J. 2015 Mar;62(3)
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Educational Status
Employment
Female
Humans
Male
Personality Disorders - epidemiology
Risk-Taking
Sex Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
No Danish studies examining functional impairments in a naturalistic sample of clinically referred adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are available. Our study aimed to examine educational and occupational outcomes and risk-taking behaviour in a Danish clinical sample of adults with ADHD.
Naturalistic, cross-sectional study of 155 ADHD adults consecutively referred to a Danish ADHD clinic from 2010 to 2011.
A total of 51% had primary/lower secondary school only as their highest education, and 65% were not self-supporting at the time of their assessment. Criminal behaviour was found in more than 50%, suspension of driving licence in 16% and risk-taking sexual behaviour in 37-51%. Co-morbidity did not significantly increase the odds for a low educational level or of risk-taking behaviours. Having a personality disorder (PD) increased occupational vulnerability. Male gender and ADHD-C (combined type) were significantly associated with criminality and suspension of driving licence. Patients with substance use disorders and PD had non-significantly increased odds for risk-taking behaviours.
Functional impairments were evident in this Danish sample of adults with ADHD. Most of our findings could not be accounted for by co-morbidity, underlining the importance of targeting treatment at ADHD itself.
This research was funded by The Psychiatric Research Foundation of the Central Denmark Region.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
25748869 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.