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A 9-week randomized trial comparing a chronotherapeutic intervention (wake and light therapy) to exercise in major depressive disorder patients treated with duloxetine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119944
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Sep;73(9):1234-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Klaus Martiny
Else Refsgaard
Vibeke Lund
Marianne Lunde
Lene Sørensen
Britta Thougaard
Lone Lindberg
Per Bech
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk Center København, Rigshospitalet, Afsnit 6202, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 København ø, Denmark. klaus.martiny@regionh.dk
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Sep;73(9):1234-42
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage
Combined Modality Therapy
Denmark
Depressive Disorder, Major - drug therapy - therapy
Exercise
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Phototherapy
Prospective Studies
Seasons
Single-Blind Method
Sleep Phase Chronotherapy
Thiophenes - administration & dosage
Abstract
The onset of action of antidepressants often takes 4 to 6 weeks. The antidepressant effect of wake therapy (sleep deprivation) comes within hours but carries a risk of relapse. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a new chronotherapeutic intervention combining wake therapy with bright light therapy and sleep time stabilization could induce a rapid and sustained augmentation of response and remission in major depressive disorder.
75 adult patients with DSM-IV major depressive disorder, recruited from psychiatric wards, psychiatric specialist practices, or general medical practices between September 2005 and August 2008, were randomly assigned to a 9-week chronotherapeutic intervention using wake therapy, bright light therapy, and sleep time stabilization (n = 37) or a 9-week intervention using daily exercise (n = 38). Patients were evaluated at a psychiatric research unit. The study period had a 1-week run-in phase in which all patients began treatment with duloxetine. This phase was followed by a 1-week intervention phase in which patients in the wake therapy group did 3 wake therapies in combination with daily morning light therapy and sleep time stabilization and patients in the exercise group began daily exercise. This phase was followed by a 7-week continuation phase with daily light therapy and sleep time stabilization or daily exercise. The 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale was the primary outcome measure, and the assessors were blinded to patients' treatment allocation.
Both groups responded well to treatment. Patients in the wake therapy group did, however, have immediate and clinically significantly better response and remission compared to the exercise group. Thus, immediately after the intervention phase (week 2), response was obtained in 41.4% of wake therapy patients versus 12.8% of exercise patients (odds ratio [OR] = 4.8; 95% CI, 1.7-13.4; P = .003), and remission was obtained in 23.9% of wake therapy patients versus 5.4% of exercise patients (OR = 5.5; 95% CI, 1.7-17.8; P = .004). These superior response and remission rates obtained by the wake therapy patients were sustained for the whole study period. At week 9, response was obtained in 71.4% of wake therapy patients versus 47.3% of exercise patients (OR = 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1-7.3; P = .04), and remission was obtained in 45.6% of wake therapy patients and 23.1% of exercise patients (OR = 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1-7.3, P = .04). All treatment elements were well tolerated.
Patients treated with wake therapy in combination with bright light therapy and sleep time stabilization had an augmented and sustained antidepressant response and remission compared to patients treated with exercise, who also had a clinically relevant antidepressant response.
ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00149110.
PubMed ID
23059149 View in PubMed
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Acute and long-term psychiatric side effects of mefloquine: a follow-up on Danish adverse event reports.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264815
Source
Travel Med Infect Dis. 2015 Jan-Feb;13(1):80-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Åsa Ringqvist
Per Bech
Birte Glenthøj
Eskild Petersen
Source
Travel Med Infect Dis. 2015 Jan-Feb;13(1):80-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Antimalarials - adverse effects
Anxiety - chemically induced - epidemiology
Bipolar Disorder - chemically induced - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - chemically induced - epidemiology
Electronic Health Records
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hallucinations - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mefloquine - adverse effects
Mental Disorders - chemically induced - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Psychoses, Substance-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Questionnaires
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to explore the profile of acute and long-term psychiatric side effects associated with mefloquine.
Subjects (n = 73) reported to a Danish national register during five consecutive years for mefloquine associated side effects were included. Acute psychiatric side effects were retrospectively assessed using the SCL-90-R and questions based on Present State Examination (PSE). Subjects reporting suspected psychotic states were contacted for a personal PSE interview. Electronic records of psychiatric hospitalizations and diagnoses were cross-checked. Long-term effects were evaluated with SF-36. SCL-90-R and SF-36 data were compared to age- and gender matched controls.
In the SCL-90-R, clinically significant scores for anxiety, phobic anxiety and depression were found in 55%, 51%, and 44% of the mefloquine group. Substantial acute phase psychotic symptoms were found in 15% and were time-limited. Illusions/hallucinations were more frequently observed among women. Cases of hypomania/mania in the acute phase were 5.5%. Significant long-term mental health effects were demonstrated for the SF-36 subscales mental health (MH), role emotional (RE), and vitality (VT) in the mefloquine group compared to matched controls.
The most frequent acute psychiatric problems were anxiety, depression, and psychotic symptoms. Data indicated that subjects experiencing acute mefloquine adverse side effects may develop long-term mental health problems with a decreased sense of global quality of life with lack of energy, nervousness, and depression.
PubMed ID
25435322 View in PubMed
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The association between physical morbidity and subtypes of severe depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119036
Source
Psychother Psychosom. 2013;82(1):45-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Søren Dinesen Ostergaard
Georgios Petrides
Peter Thisted Dinesen
Søren Skadhede
Per Bech
Povl Munk-Jørgensen
Jimmi Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Unit for Psychiatric Research, Aalborg Psychiatric Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. sdo@rn.dk
Source
Psychother Psychosom. 2013;82(1):45-52
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Disorders, Psychotic - epidemiology
Age of Onset
Comorbidity
Denmark
Depressive Disorder - classification - epidemiology
Female
Heart Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk
Severity of Illness Index
Stroke - epidemiology
Abstract
Physical illness and depression are related, but the association between specific physical diseases and diagnostic subtypes of depression remains poorly understood. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between a number of physical diseases and the nonpsychotic and psychotic subtype of severe depression.
This is a historical prospective cohort study. The study population consisted of all patients diagnosed with ICD-10 severe depression, either nonpsychotic or psychotic subtype, in Danish psychiatric hospitals between 1994 and 2008. The patients' history of physical disease was assessed using the Danish National Patient Register. Using logistic regression it was investigated whether specific physical diseases were associated with relative increased risk for subsequent development of either the nonpsychotic or psychotic depressive subtype.
A total of 24,173 patients with severe depression were included in the study. Of those, 8,260 (34%) were of the psychotic subtype. A history of the following physical diseases, as opposed to their absence, increased the relative risk for subsequent development of the nonpsychotic compared to the psychotic depressive subtype [adjusted incidence odds ratio (AIOR) nonpsychotic vs. psychotic]: ischemic heart disease (AIOR = 1.3, p
PubMed ID
23147239 View in PubMed
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A clinimetric analysis of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (SCL-90-R) in general population studies (Denmark, Norway, and Italy).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278941
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2016 Jul;70(5):374-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Danilo Carrozzino
Olav Vassend
Flemming Bjørndal
Claudia Pignolo
Lis Raabæk Olsen
Per Bech
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2016 Jul;70(5):374-9
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Checklist
Denmark
Female
Humans
Italy
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Norway
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Reproducibility of Results
Young Adult
Abstract
Although the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90-R) is one of the most widely used self-reported scales covering several psychopathological states, the scalability of the SCL-90-R has been found to be very problematic.
We have performed a clinimetric analysis of the SCL-90-R, taking both its factor structure and scalability (i.e. total scale score a sufficient statistic) into account.
The applicability of the SCL-90-R has been found acceptable in general population studies from Denmark, Norway and Italy. These studies were examined with principal component analysis (PCA) to identify the factor structure. The scalability of the traditional SCL-90-R subscales (i.e. somatization, hostility, and interpersonal sensitivity) as well as the affective subscales (i.e. depression and anxiety and ADHD), were tested by Mokken's item response theory model.
Across the three general population studies the traditional scaled SCL-90-R factor including 83 items was identified by PCA. The Mokken analysis accepted the scalability of both the general factor and the clinical SCL-90-R subscales under examination.
The traditional, scaled, general 83 item SCL-90-R scale is a valid measure of general psychopathology. The SCL-90-R subscales of somatization, hostility, and interpersonal sensitivity as well as the affective subscales of depression, anxiety, and ADHD were all accepted by the Mokken test for scalability, i.e. their total scores are sufficient statistics.
PubMed ID
27049691 View in PubMed
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Comparison of psychiatric disability on the health of nation outcome scales (HoNOS) in resettled traumatized refugee outpatients and Danish inpatients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267219
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2014;14:330
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Sabina Palic
Michelle Lind Kappel
Monica Stougaard Nielsen
Jessica Carlsson
Per Bech
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2014;14:330
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Disabled Persons - psychology
Emigration and Immigration - trends
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients - psychology
Refugees - psychology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Currently, the mental health issues of traumatized refugees are mainly documented in terms of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety. Importantly, there are no reports of the level of psychiatric disability in treatment seeking traumatized refugees resettled in the West. Insufficient acknowledgment of the collective load of bio-psycho-social problems in this patient group hinders effective psychiatric and social service utilization outside the specialized clinics for traumatized refugees.
The level of psychiatric disability in traumatized refugees from Danish specialized clinics (N = 448) is documented using routine monitoring data from pre- and post-treatment on the Health of Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS). Furthermore, the HoNOS ratings are compared with routine monitoring data from Danish inpatients with different diagnoses (N = 10.911).
The routinely collected data indicated that despite their outpatient status, traumatized refugees had higher levels of psychiatric disability at pre-treatment compared to most inpatients. Moreover, the traumatized refugees had a HoNOS profile characterized by an overall high problem level in various psychiatric and social domains. The rate of pre- to post-treatment improvement on the HoNOS was smaller for the traumatized refugees than it was for the psychiatric inpatients.
The level, and the versatile profile, of psychiatric disability on the HoNOS point to complex bio-psycho-social problems in resettled treatment seeking traumatized refugees. Thus, a broader assessment of symptoms and better cooperation between psychiatric, health care, and social systems is necessary in order to meet the treatment needs of this group.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25519423 View in PubMed
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Compensating for non-response in a study estimating the incidence of mental disorders in long-term sickness absence by a two-phased design.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99364
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Aug;38(6):625-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Hans Jørgen Søgaard
Per Bech
Author Affiliation
Central Denmark Region, Regional Psychiatric Services, Herning and Research Unit West Centre for Psychiatric Research, Herning, Denmark. Hans-Joergen.Soegaard@ps.rm.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Aug;38(6):625-32
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Sick Leave
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
AIMS: The study compensates for the non-response that was observed in a previous study that estimated the frequencies of mental disorders in long-term sickness absence (LSA) (more than eight weeks of continuous sickness absence). In this study, the frequency of any mental disorder was estimated at 48% by a two-phase design and weighted logistic regression. The total non-response rate was 53.6%. This motivated the present study to compensate for non-response by applying adjustment of the weights and by multiple imputation of missing data in the estimation of the frequencies of mental disorders. METHODS: The study took place in a Danish population of 120,000 inhabitants. During one year, all 2,414 incident individuals on LSA were identified. By a two-phase design 1,121 individuals were screened in Phase 1. In Phase 2, which was a subsample of Phase 1, 337 individuals participated in a psychiatric diagnostic examination applying Present State Examination as gold standard. The weighted analyses were based on scores of the screening instrument SCL-8AD compiled of SCL-8, SCL-ANX4, and SCL-DEP6 from the Common Mental Disorders Screening Questionnaire. In the present study, the variables sex, age, municipality, and social transfer income variables were used for the adjustment of weights in weighted analyses and in the imputation models. RESULTS: The frequencies were: any mental disorder 46%-49%, depression 31%-36%, anxiety 13%-15%, and somatoform disorder 8%-9%. CONCLUSIONS: Irrespective of whether compensation for non-response was applied, the frequencies of mental disorders were similar. The variables used for the compensation were of problematic value.
PubMed ID
20529969 View in PubMed
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The construct validity of the Perceived Stress Scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278223
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2016 May;84:22-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Marie Germund Nielsen
Eva Ørnbøl
Mogens Vestergaard
Per Bech
Finn Breinholt Larsen
Mathias Lasgaard
Kaj Sparle Christensen
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2016 May;84:22-30
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Psychometrics - methods
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Social Perception
Stress, Psychological
Surveys and Questionnaires - standards
Abstract
Stress impacts the quality of life and is associated with increased risk of mental and physical disorders. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) is widely used for measuring psychological distress. Although the instrument was originally defined as a single construct, several studies based on classical test theory suggest that a two-dimensional structure is more dominant. We aimed to explore the construct validity and dimensionality of the PSS-10 using modern test theory to determine if the scale is predominantly for a one- or a two-dimensional model.
The study population consisted of 32,374 citizens who completed the PSS-10 as part of the Danish National Health Survey in 2010. We investigated the construct validity of the PSS-10 by CFA. We examined the scalability by investigating the fit of the data distribution in a unidimensional Rasch model and performing modification of response categories, persons and items. The scale dimensionality was additionally assessed by Mokken and Rasch analysis.
The PSS-10 did not fit the Rasch model. Item four indicated the largest misfit, and items four and seven displayed disordered thresholds. Unidimensionality could not be established although the data showed improved fit to the Rasch model for the two dimensions respectively with the positive and negative items. Mokken analysis revealed fit to the unidimensional model, but disordered thresholds were shown for item four.
Our large population-based study indicated scalability problems in the current version of the PSS-10. The conducted analysis overall revealed better statistical fit for a two-dimensional than a unidimensional model.
PubMed ID
27095155 View in PubMed
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Depressive and bipolar disorders: patients' attitudes and beliefs towards depression and antidepressants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45660
Source
Psychol Med. 2005 Aug;35(8):1205-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Lars Vedel Kessing
Hanne Vibe Hansen
Koen Demyttenaere
Per Bech
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Rigshospitalet University Hospital of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. lars.kessing@rh.dk
Source
Psychol Med. 2005 Aug;35(8):1205-13
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Attitude to Health
Bipolar Disorder - drug therapy - psychology
Culture
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is increasing evidence that attitudes and beliefs are important in predicting adherence to treatment and medication in depressive and bipolar disorders. However, these attitudes have received little study in patients whose disorders were sufficiently severe to require hospitalization. METHOD: The Antidepressant Compliance Questionnaire (ADCQ) was mailed to a large population of patients with depressive or bipolar disorder, representative of patients treated in hospital settings in Denmark. RESULTS: Of the 1005 recipients, 49.9% responded to the letter. A large proportion of the patients (40-80%) had erroneous views as to the effect of antidepressants. Older patients (over 40 years of age) consistently had a more negative view of the doctor-patient relationship, more erroneous ideas concerning the effect of antidepressants and a more negative view of antidepressants in general. Moreover, their partners agreed on these negative views. Women had a more negative view of the doctor-patient relationship than men, and patients with a depressive disorder had a more negative view of antidepressants than patients with bipolar disorder. The number of psychiatric hospitalizations or the type of treating physician (general practitioner, psychiatrist in private practice, community psychiatrist, hospital psychiatrist, other doctor) did not affect attitudes and beliefs. CONCLUSION: Lack of knowledge about affective disorder and its treatment and a critical attitude, especially among older patients, may add to an adverse prognosis of depressive and bipolar disorders.
PubMed ID
16116946 View in PubMed
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The effect of detecting undetected common mental disorders on psychological distress and quality of life in long-term sickness absence: a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141999
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Dec;38(8):845-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Hans Jørgen Søgaard
Per Bech
Author Affiliation
Research Unit West, Centre for Psychiatric Research, Herning, Denmark. Hans-Joergen.Soegaard@ps.rm.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Dec;38(8):845-56
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comorbidity
Cost of Illness
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Rehabilitation, Vocational
Sick Leave
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
The burden imposed by common mental disorders on individuals and society calls for interventions aimed at reducing psychological distress and improving quality of life.
To study whether detection of mental disorders plus feedback to individuals and caregivers reduces psychological distress and improves quality of life in long-term sickness absence (LSA), defined as continuous sick-leave for more than 8 weeks. Mental disorders were detected by Present State Examination.
The study population comprised 118,000 inhabitants. During 1 year, all incident individuals on LSA were identified from public registers regarding sickness transfer income. Common Mental Disorders Screening Questionnaire (CMD-SQ) (psychological distress) and SF-36 (quality of life) were sent to 2414 incident individuals on LSA, response rate 46.7%. In a randomised controlled trial for individuals with a certain level of psychological distress, 420 participants were allocated to an intervention group and 416 to a control group. The dropout at 12-months follow-up was 22.4% in the intervention group and 13.9% in the control group.
There were no significant effects for individuals sick-listed with a psychiatric sick-leave diagnosis. For individuals without a psychiatric sick-leave diagnosis, significant effects were seen in the subscales of CMD-SQ (effect sizes: 0.20-0.28) and in more subscales of SF-36 (effect sizes: 0.12-0.22). The effects varied according to socio-demographic characteristics and somatic sick-leave diagnoses.
The intervention was most effective for individuals without a psychiatric sick-leave diagnosis sick-listed from full-time work. Thus, despite small effect sizes, the intervention may be efficient for large subgroups on LSA.
PubMed ID
20651000 View in PubMed
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The effect of IPS-modified, an early intervention for people with mood and anxiety disorders: study protocol for a randomised clinical superiority trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105503
Source
Trials. 2013;14:442
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Lone Hellström
Per Bech
Merete Nordentoft
Jane Lindschou
Lene Falgaard Eplov
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen University Hospital, Research Unit, Mental Health Centre Copenhagen, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, DK-2400 Copenhagen, Denmark. lone.hellstroem@regionh.dk.
Source
Trials. 2013;14:442
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Clinical Protocols
Competitive Behavior
Denmark
Disability Evaluation
Early Medical Intervention
Humans
Mentors
Mood Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Quality of Life
Research Design
Return to work
Single-Blind Method
Social Support
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Anxiety and affective disorders can be disabling and have a major impact on the ability to work. In Denmark, people with a mental disorder, and mainly non-psychotic disorders, represent a substantial and increasing part of those receiving disability pensions. Previous studies have indicated that Individual Placement and Support (IPS) has a positive effect on employment when provided to people with severe mental illness. This modified IPS intervention is aimed at supporting people with recently diagnosed anxiety or affective disorders in regaining their ability to work and facilitate their return to work or education.
To investigate whether an early modified IPS intervention has an effect on employment and education when provided to people with recently diagnosed anxiety or affective disorders in a Danish context.
The trial is a randomised, assessor-blinded, clinical superiority trial of an early modified IPS intervention in addition to treatment-as-usual compared to treatment-as-usual alone for 324 participants diagnosed with an affective disorder or anxiety disorder living in the Capital Region of Denmark. The primary outcome is competitive employment or education at 24 months. Secondary outcomes are days of competitive employment or education, illness symptoms and level of functioning including quality of life at follow-up 12 and 24 months after baseline.
If the modified IPS intervention is shown to be superior to treatment-as-usual, a larger number of disability pensions can probably be avoided and long-term sickness absences reduced, with major benefits to society and patients. This trial will add to the evidence of how best to support people's return to employment or education after a psychiatric disorder.
NCT01721824.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24368060 View in PubMed
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27 records – page 1 of 3.