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Addressing the realities [correction of realties] of health care in northern aboriginal communities through participatory action research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175481
Source
J Interprof Care. 2004 Nov;18(4):360-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Bruce Minore
Margaret Boone
Mae Katt
Peggy Kinch
Stephen Birch
Author Affiliation
Center for Rural and Northern Health Research, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. bruce.minore@lakeheadu.ca
Source
J Interprof Care. 2004 Nov;18(4):360-8
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Community Health Services - economics - supply & distribution
Consumer Participation
Continuity of Patient Care - economics - organization & administration
Diabetes Mellitus - ethnology - therapy
Female
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Mental Health Services - supply & distribution
Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Rural Health Services - economics - supply & distribution
Abstract
To address concerns about disruptions in the continuity of health care delivered to residents in three remote aboriginal communities in northern Ontario, Canada, the local health authority initiated a study in collaboration with the department of Health Canada responsible for ensuring that aboriginal reserves receive mandatory health services, and an inter-disciplinary team of researchers from two universities. The study focussed on the delivery of oncology, diabetes and mental health care, specifically, as well as systems issues such as recruitment and retention of health human resources and financial costs. The paper discusses the procedures involved, the benefits derived and the challenges encountered in doing this as a community driven participatory action research project. It also summarizes the findings that led to community formulated policy and program recommendations.
PubMed ID
15801551 View in PubMed
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The effects of nursing turnover on continuity of care in isolated First Nation communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174830
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Mar;37(1):86-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Bruce Minore
Margaret Boone
Mae Katt
Peggy Kinch
Stephen Birch
Christopher Mushquash
Author Affiliation
Centre for Rural and Northern Health Research, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Mar;37(1):86-100
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication
Community Health Nursing - manpower
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Diabetes Mellitus - nursing
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American
Interprofessional Relations
Medically underserved area
Mental Disorders - nursing
Neoplasms - nursing
Nurse's Role
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Audit
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology - supply & distribution
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - organization & administration
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Health Care - standards
Questionnaires
Abstract
Many of Canada's northern First Nation communities experience difficulty recruiting and retaining appropriate nursing staff and must rely on relief nurses for short-term coverage. The latter often are not adequately prepared for the demanding nature of the practice. This study examined the consequences of nursing turnover on the continuity of care provided to residents of three Ojibway communities in northern Ontario. The findings are based on a review of 135 charts of oncology, diabetes, and mental health clients, and on interviews with 30 professional and paraprofessional health-care providers who served the communities. Nursing turnover is shown to detrimentally affect communications, medications management, and the range of services offered; it also results in compromised follow-up, client disengagement, illness exacerbation, and an added burden of care for family and community members.
Notes
Erratum In: Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Jun;37(2):2
PubMed ID
15887767 View in PubMed
Less detail