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Key process and organization indicators in the dietetic management of dyslipidemia in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190835
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2002;63(1):10-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Rhona M Hanning
Ruth Diaz
Paula M Brauer
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2002;63(1):10-9
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Weight
Canada
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Dietetics
Exercise
Humans
Hyperlipidemias - therapy
Logistic Models
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
Diet interventions for dyslipidemia can produce clinically relevant changes in lipoprotein levels. To determine whether current nutrition counselling practices are consistent with such interventions, we studied aspects of Canadian dietitians' practice. Respondents to a self-administered mail survey (n=350) described practice for three groups of clients: those without and those with cardiovascular disease counselled through ambulatory care, and those with cardiovascular disease who were hospitalized. The process-of-care factors assessed were time spent in initial and follow-up sessions, diet, anthropometry, blood lipids, physical activity, and social and genetic factors. Organization factors assessed included availability of medical history and laboratory data, and perceived support for counselling services. Initial individual interview times averaged one hour, with 49% to 57% of respondents offering scheduled follow-up services versus passive or no follow-up services. Overall, counselling practices were consistent with efficacious interventions, but there was wide variation. This was particularly evident in ambulatory care, where higher percentages of clients received follow-up care when respondents reported multidisciplinary group practice; better access to the medical history, and more frequent assessment of measured body weight, client social support, and laboratory data during follow-up care (all p
Notes
Erratum In: Can J Diet Pract Res 2002 Summer;63(2):53
PubMed ID
11916462 View in PubMed
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Patient reports of lifestyle advice in primary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120901
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012;73(3):122-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Paula M Brauer
Lee Anne Sergeant
Bridget Davidson
Rick Goy
Linda Dietrich
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012;73(3):122-7
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Health Behavior
Health Communication - methods
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Preventive Medicine - methods - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - methods
Questionnaires
Abstract
Patients' perceptions of preventive lifestyle in primary care practice were examined.
Practice was assessed with a modified version of the Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS). This was mailed to random samples of patients twice, using practice mailing lists from three Ontario Family Health Networks (FHNs). Family Health Networks are physician-based group practices, with additional nurse-led telephone advisory services to provide care 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The PCAS questionnaire consisted of nine scales (ranging from 0 to 100). For preventive counselling, additional questions on diet and exercise counselling were included to determine how the physician delivered the intervention.
Of the 2184 survey questionnaires mailed to patients, 22% were undeliverable. The response rate was 62% at valid addresses (49% of all mailed questionnaires). Of the nine scales, scores (± standard deviation) for preventive counselling were lowest at 33 ± 25. In particular, rates of diet (37%) and exercise (24%) counselling were low in the FHNs. For most other aspects of primary care services, patients generally rated FHNs highly. The majority of patients advised about diet and exercise were given verbal advice or pamphlets.
In these primary health care organizations, considerable room exists for increased preventive counselling, especially about diet and exercise.
PubMed ID
22958629 View in PubMed
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