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Mind-body therapy: attitudes, beliefs and practices of graduate faculty and students from accredited marriage and family therapy programs in the U.S. and Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131426
Source
Explore (NY). 2011 Sep-Oct;7(5):320-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Michael M Olson
W David Robinson
Jenenne A Geske
Paul R Springer
Author Affiliation
University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Family Medicine, Omaha, Nebraska 68198-3075, USA. molson@unmc.edu
Source
Explore (NY). 2011 Sep-Oct;7(5):320-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Data Collection
Education, Graduate
Faculty
Family Therapy - education
Humans
Marital Therapy - education
Mind-Body Therapies - education
Physician's Practice Patterns
Students
United States
Abstract
Interest in CAM and mind-body therapies (MBT) among mental health professionals has increased over the last decade. Individuals seeking treatment for mental health concerns often use MBTs and expect clinicians to be aware of such treatments. Yet, current data reveal a critical gap in training, practice, and the needs of those seeking treatment.
To determine the attitudes, beliefs, and practices of marriage and family therapists regarding MBTs.
Electronic survey method using Likert-type scale questions.
Clinical faculty members and graduate students (N = 140) from accredited Marriage and Family Therapy programs in the United States and Canada.
Findings revealed that a majority of respondents believed that graduate programs should introduce MBT topics during course of training and that MBTs are valuable in the treatment of various clinical problems. Respondents were familiar with at least one form of MBT and reported using such in personal and professional settings.
PubMed ID
21907155 View in PubMed
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